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JUNE NEWSLETTER: VOLUME 4, ISSUE 2, 2022

JUNE NEWSLETTER: VOLUME 4, ISSUE 2, 2022

CRN11_Newsletter_Vol4Iss2_09Jun22_FINAL

WELCOME: Law and Society in Lisbon 2022!

Dear Colleagues:

Welcome to our second quarterly newsletter of the year: Volume 4, Issue 2. This issue is possible because of the volunteered contribution of Zoe Ochwango, our new CRN11 Newsletter Editor. Please join me in saying thank you to Zoe for a fabulous work done!

Are you excited about LSA 2022? Yes, we are really looking to the 7th Global Annual Meeting (Rage, Reckoning, & Remedy) of the Law and Society Association in Lisbon, Portugal from 13-16 July 2022. We’ve been told that this year’s annual meeting is LSA’s largest conference ever with over 4,500 registrants, many of whom are from the continent of Africa. This is promising and an excellent opportunity for us to expand CRN-11.

On that note, we are happy to announce that we have a total of five sessions and eighteen (18) presentations (details below) organised for you. Most importantly, CRN11 Business Meeting is scheduled for Friday, 15 July 2022 at 2:45 PM — 4:30 PM (GMT Daylight Time). To RSVP, kindly email vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca by 13 July 2022 to participate from anywhere.

CRN 11’s Migration, Displacement, and Development book series with Rowman and Littlefield (Lexington Books) is accepting manuscripts for publications. We are particularly interested in receiving manuscripts from emerging scholars and PhD candidates from the Global South. For more information, email us at vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca and benders@seattleu.edu.

In closing, we would like to reaffirm our support for all those displaced by war and conflict in Ukraine, Ethiopia, Afghanistan, Yemen, Israel-Palestine, and Myanmar

Veronica Fynn Bruey and Steven Bender

DISPLACED PEOPLES’ RIGHTS AND PROTECTION

The United Nation High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) works in partnership with the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and International Paralympic Committee (IPC), to support the refugees who – despite the challenges of displacement and the COVID-19 pandemic – have continued to train to keep their dreams of competing in Tokyo alive. The Refugee Olympic and Paralympic Teams travelling to Tokyo will bring hope and inspiration to millions worldwide and will shine a light on the power of sport to help displaced people rebuild their lives. More information available here.

In May 2022, over fifty anti-human trafficking experts from around twenty countries and territories met in Croatia to discuss measures to tackle sex trafficking in South-Eastern Europe by focussing on the demand that fuels sexual exploitation. Regular research, conducted by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), consistently shows that the most detected form of human trafficking is for the purpose of sexual exploitation – with the majority of victims being women and girls. “Demand is the bridge between the victim and the trafficker – without the demand, there would not be the supply,” said Silke Albert, the Head of UNODC’s Global Programmes against Trafficking in Persons and Smuggling of Migrants. More information available here.

On 10 June 2022, the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) released new data showing that while reported numbers of refugees and migrants crossing the Mediterranean to Europe are fewer than in 2015, journeys are becoming more fatal.  According to UNHCR, last year, some 3,231 were recorded as dead or missing at sea in the Mediterranean and the northwest Atlantic, with 1,881 in 2020; 1,510 in 2019; and more than 2,277 for 2018.  UNHCR has continuously been warning of the horrific experiences and dangers faced by refugees and migrants who resort to these journeys.  In addition to the rising death toll at sea, UNHCR remains concerned that deaths and abuses are widespread along land routes, most commonly in and through the countries of origin and transit, including Eritrea, Somalia, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Sudan and Libya. More information available here.

At the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) 9056th Meeting, Pramila Patten, the Secretary-General’s Special Representative on Sexual Violence in Conflict, recalled her recent visit to Ukraine and outlined the elements of a recently signed framework of cooperation on the prevention and response to conflict-related sexual violence, which seeks to strengthen accountability and combat those abhorrent crimes.  “Too often have the needs of women and girls in conflict settings been side-lined and treated as an afterthought,” she said, welcoming that the newly signed framework makes them an explicit priority. Voicing regret over a stark discrepancy between that painful reality and the global community’s ambition to end the use of rape as a tactic of war, allegations of sexual violence by Russian troops in Ukraine are mounting as the conflict passes its 100-day mark, a senior United Nations official told the Security Council. More information available here.

On 2 June 2022, the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) welcomes the announcement that the parties to the conflict in Yemen have agreed to the United Nations’ proposal to renew the current truce for an additional two months. The renewal of the truce will positively impact the safety and wellbeing of children and their families in Yemen, after far too many years of suffering. We hope this will lead to a lasting peace in Yemen. This is the only way to spare children’s lives and prevent more misery and grief for families caught up in this conflict.”

More information is available here.

CRN-11 EVENTS AND ACTIVITIES

Law and Society 2022, Lisbon, Portugal

Thursday, 14 July 2022

In-Person Paper Session
Session Title:  Precarity, Legality, and Indigeneity: Migrants in Limbo
Abstract: With violent conflict and hostility towards displaced peoples spread across the globe, this session confronts the disturbing uncertainties that ethnic minorities, migrants at sea, deportees, and undocumented persons experience persistently.
Session Chair/Discussant: Mengia Tschalaer, Bristol University
Date and Time: 14 July 2022: 2:45 PM – 4:30 PM (GMT Daylight Time)
Location: Sedas Nunes, 1E.02

Presentations
The Legal Status and Perspectives of Ethnic Minorities in European States: The Nationality Gambit
Magdalena Butrymowicz. Wl. Grabskiego

Authoritarian Immigration Law and Policies in Turkey
Zeynep Kivilcim, Humboldt University Berlin

Experiences with Motherhood of Lesbian-Identifying Womxn Seeking Asylum in Germany
Mengia Tschalaer, John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Human Rights and Undocumented Migrants in South Africa’s Lindela Repatriation Centre
Samuel Uwem, University of KwaZulu-Natal

The Violent Removal of Evidence for a Right to Stay: a Study of Swedish Return Migration Law in Action
Anna Lundberg, Linkoping University

Friday, 15 July 2022

Virtual Roundtable Session
Session Title: Migration, Displacement, and Development Book Series Workshop
Abstract: Migration, Displacement, and Development: A Critical Inquiry (MDD) is a recently created book series published by Lexington. This interdisciplinary book series critically examines the obstinacy to expand legal protection to displaced peoples beyond the bona fide refugee within local, regional, and international contexts. This workshop brings together five of the MDD series editors and advisory board members to discuss three topics: 1) the importance of our book series themes in this time of global disruption and displacement; 2) detail on how workshop attendees can publish their research in the new book series; and 3) suggestions on how to turn attendee research into a book-length manuscript. The overarching goal of the workshop is to encourage emerging scholars in the field to consider submitting a manuscript to the MDD book series.
Session Chair/Discussant: Veronica Fynn Bruey, Athabasca University
Date and Time: 10:15 AM – 12:00 PM (GMT Daylight Time)
Location: Virtual 02

Roundtable Participants
Steven Bender, Seattle University
John Idriss Lahai, University of New England
Heaven Crawley, Coventry University
Kate Ogg, Australian National University

In-Person Paper Session
Session Title:  Evidencing Border Violence in Europe: The Social Realities of Litigation and Adjudication
Abstract: Border violence has racial and colonial implications, which are evident at European borders (Achiume 2019). The panel aims at bringing together border realities, as documented by activists, journalists, researchers and lawyers, with what emerges from case-law and statements by states. Violence at the border has been systematically denied by authorities and seeking accountability, amongst others by bringing it to courts, is a challenge for various reasons. The panel presents papers that examine the role of evidence in pushback litigation and adjudication. We seek to encourage a truly interdisciplinary debate that takes seriously law in the books and examines challenges and avenues for translating empirical research into legal processes, and the reverse.
Session Chair: Jessica Greenberg, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Discussant: Leila Kawar, University of Michigan
Date and Time: 7/15/2022, 12:45 PM — 2:30 PM (GMT Daylight Time)
Location: Sedas Nunes, 1E.02

Presentations
On Migration and (Soft) Authoritarianism. Evidencing the border regime at the Polish-Belarusian frontier
Jens Adam, University of Bremen

Official Poof of Unofficial Practices: Evidencing Border Violence and Access Barriers to the European Court of Human Rights
Jill Alpes, Human Rights Centre, Ghent University and Grazyna Baranowska, Hertie School

Lost in Translation? Strategic Litigation, Courts and the Margin: Insights from the French-Italian Border
Bastien Charaudeau Santomauro, Sciences Po Law School, Yale University

Litigating at Sea: Violence and impunity in Search and Rescue in the Mediterranean
Mariana Gkliati, Radboud University

Representations and Uses of Human Rights Conventions: An Analysis of Subnational Lawmakers’ Relationship to International Law
Jonathan Miaz, University of Lausanne

In-Person Paper Session
Session Title: Forced Migration Laws as a Legacy of Colonialism
Abstract: The collision of colonialism and decolonization has shaped laws aimed at controlling forced migration. This panel analyzes that process and its legacies. The founding of the UN and the 1951 Refugee Convention included attempts to silence colonized people, and was reflected in a refugee regime that primarily applied to Europeans. That process was contested, however, and important exceptions to the colonial application clause promoted the expansion of the UNHCR outside Europe in unintended ways. Colonial histories intertwined with domestic policies and the international regime. In Brazil, colonial attempts to whiten the population through migration shaped post-independence policies. The legacies of colonialism are further visible in contemporary efforts to criminalize the activities of organizations working on behalf of irregular migrants.
Session Chair/Discussant: David FitzGerald, Univ. of California, San Diego
Date and Time: 7/15/2022, 12:45 PM — 2:30 PM (GMT Daylight Time)
Location: Ala Autónoma, Auditório Silva Leal

Presentations
The West Over the Rest? The Making of the 1951 Refugee Convention and States’ Colonial-ignorant Debates,
Ulrike Krause, Osnabrück University

Coloniality, Antiblackness and Migration Systems in Brazil
Natalia Cintra, University of Southampton

Situating crimes of solidarity in the long durée of colonialism
Lucy Mayblin, The University of Sheffield

From the 1951 Convention to the 1967 Protocol: Colonial Legacies, State Succession, and the Globalization of the International Refugee Regime
Benjamin White, University of Glasgow

Business Meeting
CRN11 Displaced Peoples Business Meeting
Session Chair: Veronica Fynn Bruey

Date and Time: 7/15/2022, 2:45 PM — 4:30 PM (GMT Daylight Time)
Location: Building II Meeting Room B1.02

***To RSVP, kindly email vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca by 13 July 2022 to participate from anywhere.***

Saturday, 16 July 2022

Virtual Paper Session
Session Title:  International Security and Human Rights
Abstract: This session welcomes research concerned with international security and human rights, meaning discussions on vulnerabilities, economic migration, refugees and human trafficking and the violation of Human Rights as well the initiatives and protection by the state.
Session Chair: Lara Costa, Brazilian War College
Discussant: Fernanda Duarte, UFF (INCT-InEAC) & UNESA
Date and Time: 7/16/2022, 4:45 PM — 6:30 PM (GMT Daylight Time)
Location: Virtual 01

Presentations
Identifying and Addressing Legal Deserts for Survivors of Human Trafficking
Megan Lundstrom, The Avery Center
Angela C. Henderson, University of Northern Colorado

Criminal Regime Disruption and Diffusion: Examining the Impact of Illegal Market and Governance Shocks on Organized Criminal Group Dynamics
Philip Jones, Carleton University

Abolish Deportation for Poor People: A Proposal for the Immigrant Rights Movement
Emily Tucker, Georgetown Law Center

Call for Book Proposal: Migration, Displacement and Development

Veronica Fynn Bruey and Steven Bender as co-editors, have launched the Migration, Displacement, and Development book series with Rowman and Littlefield. The interdisciplinary series critically examines the obstinacy to expand legal protection to displaced peoples beyond the bona fide refugee within local, regional, and international contexts. Extending protection to a wide range of displaced persons, the series promises to address adverse effects on those forced to leave their homes in the name of globalisation by improving the economic, social, and political conditions driving migration in favour of sustaining growth. The series strives for law and policy reform particularly in areas of trade, economy, remittance and aid as well as protecting individual rights to stay home and live a dignified life. If you are interested in turning your research into a full book, email vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca and benders@seattleu.edu.

Call For Volunteers: Advertisement and Promotion Committee

CRN-11 is also recruiting volunteers to lead the Advertisement and Promotion Committee. To apply, submit a cover letter and CV to vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca  and benders@seattleu.edu. Deadline: Open

Become a CRN-11 Research Collaborator

Interested in being a bona fide research collaborator with CRN-11? To apply, submit a cover letter and CV to vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca  and benders@seattleu.edu. Deadline: Open

Invitation to be a Guest Blogger for CRN-11

Do you have an interesting story to tell about internal and international migration and displacement? CRN 11 is eager to share your piece as a guest blogger in our quarterly newsletter.  Submit your stories to vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca and benders@seattleu.edu. Deadline: Open

GENERAL CALLS: UPCOMING EVENTS

Digitized Migrants Conference

Hosted in the framework of the Europe-Asia Research Platform on Forced Migration by: Institute for Human Sciences (IWM), Mahanirban Calcutta Research Group (MCRG) and Migration Research Centre, Koç University (MiReKoc). The conference will be held on 15-16 September 2022. Register here.

Research Topic: War and Asylum

This Research Topic in Frontiers in Human Dynamics is dedicated to the topic of “War and Asylum.” Article submissions are welcome on any aspect of this subject. Abstract submission deadline: 26 August 2022. More information is available here. 

IASFM ’19, San Paolo, Brazil

The 19th International Association for the Study of Forced Migration Conference (IASFM19), with the theme, “Global Issues, Regional Approaches – Contexts, Challenges, Dialogues and Solutions”, will be held from 1-5 August 2022 and hosted online by Universidade Católica de Santos (UniSantos). More information is available  here. Registration: opens here.

CARFMS22: Crisis” and Forced Migration: Manifestations of Power in a Changing World

The 14th Annual Conference of the Canadian Association for Refugee and Forced Migration Studies (CARFMS) will be hosted virtually in collaboration with the Human Rights Program at St Paul’s University College at the University of Waterloo o2-4 November 2022. The conference will feature keynote and plenary speeches from leaders in the field and refugees, and we welcome proposals for individual papers, organized panels and roundtables structured around the following broad sub-themes. Submit an abstract here. Deadline: 15 July 2022.

Centre of Migration Research’s 2023 Special Issue: “The State and Migrations”

The Centre of Migration Research (University of Warsaw)’s 2023 Special Issue: “The State and Migrations” in the Journal: “Social Policy Issues is calling for papers. If you are interested in submitting a manuscript proposal for this special issue, please send an abstract of 500–1,500 words outlining the manuscript’s contents, including its fit with this special issue to the editors. The full paper should be delivered by mid-October 2022. The article’s length should be between 6,000 and 9,000 words, including abstract, references and footnotes. For more information email the editors: Marta Pachocka at m.pachocka@uw.edu.pl or Marta Jaroszewicz at marta.jaroszewicz@uw.edu.pl. Deadline for submission: 30 June 2022.

Reframing Challenges of Internal Displacement in the Sahel

Complex and interlinking crises of instability and forced displacement in the Sahel region have shaped national, regional and international responses to humanitarian emergencies over the last decade. Sahelian states, humanitarian and military actors struggle to develop sustainable solutions to multiple challenges with dramatic consequences for local populations forced to flee. The conference will be held on 20 June 2022. Register here.

Mediated Wars, Mediated Refuge

Post-Graduate & Early Career Seminar. The seminar is held in a hybrid mode (in-person and online). This all-day post-graduate & early career seminar seeks to understand the relationship between communication, global politics, and war. It examines the role of global media in shaping the global conversation around war, global security, resistance, and refuge. The seminar will be held on 20 June 2022. Register here.

Asia Pacific Journal of International Humanitarian Law

The Asia-Pacific Journal of International Humanitarian Law is a publication of the Institute of International Legal  Studies University of the Philippines Law Center (UP-IILS) and the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC). Submission of articles are invited on subjects related to international humanitarian law, humanitarian policy or humanitarian action, provided the article has not been published or accepted elsewhere. In order to qualify for  submission, an article must either be authored by someone from, or based in, the Asia-Pacific region or,  alternatively, be about the Asia-Pacific region. More information is available here. Deadline: rolling

Rewriting Jurisprudence

Rewriting Jurisprudence: Centring Refugee and Migration Lived Experience is an ongoing project. In its first phase, they will be publishing a selection of rewritten judgments as articles in a special issue of a journal. They will then work towards producing a broader range of rewritten judgments for publication as an edited collection. Our strong preference is that these publications will be open access. During the project they will also publish shortened or draft versions as blog posts as a way of ensuring both accessibility and timeliness of contributions. To submit and abstract: click here.

RESEARCH, AWARDS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND FELLOWSHIPS

Notice of Funding Opportunity for Resettlement Support Center (RSC) Middle East and North Africa (MENA) and RSC Turkey and Middle East (TuME)

This announcement references PRM’s General NGO Guidelines, which contain additional information on PRM’s priorities and NGO funding strategy with which selected organizations must comply.  Please use both the General NGO Guidelines and this announcement to ensure that your concept note submission is in full compliance with PRM requirements and that the proposed activities are in line with PRM’s priorities. More information available here. Deadline: 8 July 2022

PhD and Postdoc Positions

Applications are invited for the Swiss National Center of Competence in Research (NCCR) for migration and mobility studies. The Postdoctoral Researchers and Doctoral Students will contribute to one of the NCCR – on the move projects at one of the eight partner universities in Switzerland. More information available here. Deadline: 30 June 2022

Request for Concept Notes for Operational Partners on the Private Sponsorship of Refugees Pilot Program

This announcement references PRM’s General NGO Guidelines, which contain additional information on PRM’s priorities and NGO funding strategy with which selected organizations must comply.  Please use both the General NGO Guidelines and this announcement to ensure that your concept note submission is in full compliance with PRM requirements and that the proposed activities are in line with PRM’s priorities. More information available here. Deadline: 20 June 2022.

University Researcher, EuroStorie

The Faculty of Arts of the University of Helsinki invites applications for the position for a three-year fixed term period from 1 September 2022 onwards (or as agreed) to contribute to the subproject Migration and the Narratives of Europe as an “Area of Freedom, Security and Justice” of the Centre of Excellence (CoE) in Law, Identity and the European Narratives (EuroStorie, www.eurostorie.org). There is a six-month trial period for the position. More information available here. Deadline: 16 June 2022.

Funding Programme Forced Migration

The Gerda Henkel Foundation welcomes research projects that adopt multidisciplinary approaches within this framework. Engaging in comparisons across regions and time periods should also be a priority here. Projects that incorporate intersectional perspectives and issues are highly desirable too. Depending on the research approach taken and possibilities at hand, cooperation with local knowledge producers (researchers as well as civil society actors), or people affected by displacement within countries of origin or asylum (particularly in the “Global South”), is strongly encouraged. More information is provided here. Deadline: 15 June 2022.

Grant Opportunities for Organizations Led by Displaced and Stateless People

UNHCR introduces new grant agreements that will allow them to get engaged with organizations led by displaced and stateless people in Indonesia as their partners. These new grants aim to create a simple mechanism to provide financial support to these organizations in order to assist them in realizing their projects and building their capacity; they will also allow them to work directly with the people we serve without having to use intermediaries. More information is available here. Deadline: Rolling

JOB POSTS

Humanitarian Response Program Officer- Ukraine Response (Remote)

Applications are invited for a temporary assignment until the end of December 2022, with possibility of extending. In response to the humanitarian crisis resulting from Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, CWS is establishing humanitarian and emergency response programming in Moldova. This position supports the regional and in-country teams with programmatic support including program analysis, backstopping, grants management, and coordination. More information available here. Deadline: 30 June 2022

PUBLICATIONS

New Report: Ukraine Internal Displacement Report

Between April 11 and 17, the International Organization for Migration (IOM) conducted the third round of a rapid representative assessment of the general population in Ukraine to gather insights into internal displacement and mobility flows and to assess local needs. This general population survey serves as a preliminary source to identify areas with high humanitarian needs and inform the targeting of response to assist the war-affected population. The geographical scope of the assessment covers the entire territory of Ukraine, all five macro-regions (East, North, Centre, South, and the city of Kyiv), except the Crimean peninsula. Find the full report here

New Report: Refugee Reports by Lebanese American University

For twelve weeks, the Institute for Migration Studies is partnering with organizations worldwide to shed light on twelve refugee communities’ experiences of refuge and displacement to shift the focus back to the conflicts that no longer make the headlines. In partnership with the Global Research Network’s ‘War, Conflict and Global Migration Think Tank’, the third profile focuses on Burundi’s conflict that can be understood in the context of colonial and post-colonial historical migration patterns. In the fourth week, in partnership with the Department of Migration and Globalization, Danube University Krems is focused on displacement in Afghanistan and the current trends post-re-establishment of Taliban rule after ending a two-decade-long military presence in the country. Find the full report here.

New Report: Pushed into the Shadows: Mexico’s Reception of Haitian Migrants

Mexico’s response to Haitians seeking safety has been chaotic, neglectful, and discriminatory. A Refugees International team spoke with Haitian men and women about their experiences finding safety in Mexico and throughout the hemisphere—and recommended a new approach. Find the full report here.

New Report: After the Coup: Burkina Faso’s Humanitarian and Displacement Crisis

Burkina Faso’s humanitarian emergency is getting worse. A longer-than-usual dry season and a worsening global grain shortage amid the Russia-Ukraine conflict—where more than a third of the country’s grains are imported—make the action more urgent than ever. Find the full report here.

New Report: “I’m a Prisoner Here”: Biden Administration Policies Lock Up Asylum Seekers

The Biden administration has detained tens of thousands of asylum seekers in violation of the UN Refugee Convention. The 1951 UN Refugee Convention states that signatory nations “shall not impose penalties, on account of their illegal entry or presence, on refugees… provided they present themselves without delay.”The United States has the most extensive immigration detention system in the world. Find the full report here.

Journal Article: ‘Twentieth Century Histories of Civic Society Responses to Crises of Displacement’

This special issue of displaced voices marks the 70th anniversary of the UK Refugee Council. The articles in this issue take up the theme of voluntary organizations that support refugees, from the local to the national, interrogating how volunteer and community work at various scales can help refugees, build understanding and solidarity, and develop connections between historically disparate refugee arrivals. This issue raises new questions about what it means to organize for refugees and our roles and responsibilities. Get the full paper here.

Journal Article: ‘A Network Society Communicative Model for Optimising the Refugee Status Determination System’

The book aims to analyze the Refugee Status Determination (RSD) to locate the reader on the development of the theme, the forms and actors responsible for its application, and, in the last chapter, to present suggestions for improving the RSD system developed around the world. In addition, the text provides several elements that mark these 70 years of development of the Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees while touching on sensitive issues. Find the publication here.

Journal Article: ‘Solidarity in the Time of COVID-19: Refugee Experiences in Brazil’

Refugees have adopted solidarity actions during the COVID-19 pandemic, even after being left behind during health emergencies. This article contributes to the literature on solidarity and asylum by discussing refugees’ solidarity narratives towards vulnerable Brazilian groups, the refugee community, and the Brazilian population in general. The author conducted 29 in-depth semi-structured interviews with refugees living in Brazil between March 27 and April 6, 2020. Refugees’ past suffering experiences make them more empathic to other people’s suffering due to the pandemic, which creates an inclusive victim consciousness that seems to explain their soli- darity narratives towards different groups. Find the publication here. 

Journal Article: ‘More Important than COVID-19”: Temporary Visas and Compounding Vulnerabilities for Health and Well-Being from the COVID-19 Pandemic for Refugees and Asylum Seekers in Australia’

Refugees and asylum seekers on temporary visas typically experience interacting issues related to employment, financial precarity, and poor health and well-being. Interviews were conducted before and during the COVID-19 pandemic with 15 refugees and asylum seekers living in South Australia on temporary visas. The authors found that COVID-19 led to adverse health and other outcomes such as employment challenges. The findings emphasize the importance of immigration and welfare policy. Find the full paper here.

Journal Article: ‘Locating the Concept of Vulnerability in Canada’s Refugee Policies at Home and Abroad’

This article presents findings from research conducted as part of the VULNER project (2019–23). The authors analyze how the vulnerability is operationalized in Canada’s inland refugee (or asylum) determination procedures compared to its overseas resettlement program by first discussing some general principles, followed by examining the treatment of women and LGBTQI+ individuals seeking protection. Find the full article here.

Journal Article: ‘The Impacts of Internal Displacement on Local Communities: Examples from Ethiopia and Somalia ’

Assumptions about the impacts of internal displacement often associate the arrival of internally displaced people (IDPs) with a rise in prices, unemployment, and insecurity in the areas to which they flee. This article questions these assumptions using primary data collected from over 300 IDPs living in settlements in Ethiopia and Somalia, and 300 members of non-displaced populations living in surrounding local communities. Find the full article here.

Policy Paper: Beyond consultation: Towards meaningful participation of refugees

Research on forced displacement reveals a wide gap between policy processes and the people that such processes seek to assist. This paper proposes actionable recommendations on how to operationalize the concept of ‘meaningful refugee participation’ in decision-making processes that affect the lives of refugees. Access the paper here.

Policy Brief: ‘As people continue to flee Ukraine, Europe must turn its promises of protection into a lasting reality’

As refugees continue to flee Ukraine, the International Rescue Committee (IRC) outlines eight key actions the EU and its member states must take to ensure a humane and effective response. Access the paper here.

Magazine Article: ‘How LGBTQI+ to LGBTQI+ support is helping Ukrainian refugees find safety in the EU

In just over three months since Russia began its full-scale invasion, nearly seven million people have fled Ukraine as refugees. The vast majority are Ukrainian women and children who have been received in neighbouring countries, mainly with open arms. Access the article here.

Documentary Film: ‘Flee’

Flee is an animated account of a young Afghan boy named Amin’s perilous journey, and it begins with a powerful question: “What does home mean to you?” It then goes on to describe how Amin, who used to shut out the world with his headphones while listening to pop music, can no longer ignore Afghanistan’s civil unrest. Find the full documentary here.

Documentary Film: ‘Born in Syria’

The documentary tells the stories of seven children whose lives and families have been shattered. The essence of the film is encapsulated in the words of 13-year-old Marwan, who says, “I thought crossing the sea would be the worst, but having nowhere to go is worse.” Find the documentary here.

Documentary Film: ‘Human Flow’

This film confronts us with stories that are largely untold, using drones to sweep across the flow of migrants and intimate accounts shot with phone cameras. The film is a call to compassion and empathy for fellow humans who have nothing to do with the geopolitical upheavals in which they are helplessly caught. Find the documentary here.

Documentary Film: ‘First they killed my father’

Angelina Jolie’s film adaptation of activist Loung Ung’s autobiographical book by Oscar-winning actor, director, and UNHCR Special Envoy Angelina Jolie allows us to see the Cambodian genocide through the eyes of a young survivor. The film recounts how the young girl and her family endured unspeakable suffering under Pol Pot’s regime. Find the film here.

E-Learning: ‘Interpreting for Refugees: Contexts, Practices, and Ethics Course – The University of Glasgow’

Enroll in this 3-week online course and Learn skills to meet the challenges of interpreting for refugees and share your experiences with other interpreters in the sector. More information is available here.

E-Learning: ‘MA In Refugee Protection and Forced Migration Studies’

The online program by the University of London provides a solid legal, practical, and theoretical understanding of refugee protection and forced migration. You will become more independent in managing and critiquing law, policy, and practice, and also in gathering, organizing, and deploying evidence to form balanced judgments and develop policy recommendations. More information is available here.

E-Learning: ‘Master’s Degree in Migration and Refugee Care’

The Online Master in Migration and Attention to Refugees offered by the Seneca Institute, aims to respond to the need for the qualification that is needed in an area that demands professional attention, in response to the delicate situation presented by migrant and refugee groups. More information is available here.

New Book: ‘Internally Displaced Persons and the Law in Nigeria’

This book examines the national legal frameworks in place for internally displaced people in Nigeria and considers how they can be extended to provide further legal protection. This book will be of interest to researchers of African studies and internal displacement, as well as to policy makers, civil society organizations, humanitarian actors, and other regional and international stakeholders. Access the book here.

New Book: ‘Internally Displaced Persons and International Refugee Law’

This book explores to what extent the protection of IDPs complements or conflicts with international refugee law. Three questions form the core of the book’s analysis: What is the legal and normative relationship between IDPs and refugees? To what extent is an individual’s real risk of internal displacement in their country of origin relevant to the qualification and cessation of refugee status? Access the book here.

New Book: ‘Jobs Interventions for Refugees and Internally Displaced Persons’

This literature review brings together two strands of research to inform the design of successful job interventions in this context: the evidence on how forced displacement impacts those forcibly displaced in their economic lives and the existing knowledge on jobs interventions for refugees and IDPs. Access the book here.

New Book: ‘Durable Solutions’

The book reveals the simultaneous progress and setbacks in implementing durable solutions. Successfully combining approaches from humanistic studies, international relations, and organizational sociology, this book explains the interaction of norms and actors at and among three societal levels: the international, national, and local. Access the book here.

New Book: ‘Being-Here’

Exploring the lifeworlds of Halima, Omar and Mohamed, three middle-aged Somalis living in Melbourne, Australia, the author discusses the interrelated meanings of emplacement and displacement as experienced in people’s everyday lives. Through their experiences of displacement and placemaking, Being-Here examines the figure of the refugee as a metaphor for societal alienation and estrangement, and moves anthropological theory towards a new understanding of the crucial existential links between Sein (Being) and Da (Here). Access the book here.

New Book: ‘From Bureaucracy to Bullets’

There are currently a record-setting number of forcibly displaced persons in the world. This number continues to rise as solutions to alleviate humanitarian catastrophes of large-scale violence and displacement continue to fail. The likelihood of the displaced returning to their homes is becoming increasingly unlikely. In many cases, their homes have been destroyed as the result of violence. Why are the homes of certain populations targeted for destruction? What are the impacts of loss of home upon children, adults, families, communities, and societies? Access the book here.

Blog Post: ‘Why should migration research focus on African intermediary cities?’

 Intermediary city’s functionality and connectivity can be shaped through networked flows formed by human mobility, ideas, technology, trade, and capital among other factors. Access the post here.

Podcast: ‘Is it possible to predict future forced displacement?’

In this episode of Fixing Aid, host Alae Ismail explores if aid responses could be improved if the forced displacements of the future were more accurately predicted. Access the podcast here.

ANNOUNCEMENTS, CAMPAIGNS, AND ALERTS

World Refugee Day 2022: Worldwide Events

Each year on June 20, the world celebrates World Refugee Day. This year, the focus will be on the right to seek safety. Every person on this planet has a right to seek safety – whoever they are, wherever they come from and whenever they are forced to flee. Watch this page leading up to 20 June 2022 for more information and activities. More information here.

Postgraduate Course: MA Refugee Care

Interested in the course but want to study online? This unique course brings together people from diverse walks of life and parts of the globe to explore how we can care for refugees more effectively. Through lively seminar discussion we unpack refugee experiences as multi-dimensional and complex, and explore psychosocial perspectives and different types of intervention and activism. We discuss how we may become more therapeutic in our work with refugees, beyond merely offering psychotherapy. More information here.

Refugee Week 2022: Share Your Ideas

Refugee Week is a UK-wide festival celebrating the contributions, creativity, and resilience of refugees and people seeking sanctuary. Founded in 1998 and held every year around World Refugee Day on the 20 June, Refugee Week is a growing global movement. The 2022 theme for Refugee Week and World Refugee Week is ‘Healing’. Through creativity and conversations, Refugee Week 2022 will be a celebration of community, mutual care, and the human ability to start again. More information here

#KuuleekoKukaan (#CanAnyoneHear) Campaign

A new campaign has launched in Finland that gives a platform to voices and viewpoints that might not otherwise be heard. The campaign gives migrants with a refugee background the opportunity to make their voices heard in terms of participation in Finnish society and services. It shares blog posts and social media posts created by people with a refugee background, connected and promoted by the hashtag #KuuleekoKukaan. More information here

Unaccompanied Footsteps Campaign

Campaign to raise awareness of the risks faced by unaccompanied refugee and migrant children and adolescents in Latin America. Join the campaign with the hashtag: #UnaccompaniedFootsteps. More information here.

IN THE NEWS

The Guardian, Number of displaced people passes 100m for the first time, says UN (10 June 2022)

AfricaNews, Algeria ends 2-decade friendship treaty with Spain over Western Sahara (9 June 2022)

CBC News, ‘It’s going unreported’: Program on Six Nations, Ont., out to open eyes on what human trafficking is (8 June 2022)

Telesur, Colombia’s Beloved ‘Doña Tuta’ Is Shot Dead (8 June 2022)

Reuters, UK aims to send the first group of asylum seekers to Rwanda on June 14 (1 June 2022)

Sudbury, Immigration report shows skills don’t always match job market (30 May 2022)

Aljazeera, Refugees in Kenya’s Kakuma and Daadab Camps still in limbo, (28 May 2022)

BBC News, How many Ukrainians have fled their homes and where have they gone? (26 May 2022)

Philippine Canadian Inquirer, How many immigrants will Canada welcome over the coming years? (25 May 2022)

The Montreal Gazette, First of three flights bringing about 900 Ukrainians to Canada lands in Winnipeg (23 May 2022)

The Guardian, Immigration detainees transferred from Melbourne to Christmas Island amid heated protests (4 May 2022)

Aljazeera, More than 3,000 lost at sea trying to reach Europe in 2021: UN (29 April 2022)

Norwegian Refugee Council, Will global donors rise to the occasion and prevent starvation and death for millions in Somalia, Ethiopia and Kenya? (25 April 2022)

Reliefweb, Quarterly Mixed Migration Update Asia, Quarter 1, 2022 (21 April 2022)

SEND US YOUR NEWS AND EVENTS

Displaced Peoples (CRN11) newsletter is published quarterly.  The newsletter is a venue for sharing information regarding displaced peoples, broadly defined. Your contribution to the newsletter is crucial to its sustenance, success and quality. To contribute to the newsletter, please contact Veronica Fynn Bruey and Steven Bender: vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca and benders@seattleu.edu. To subscribe or unsubscribe, visit CRN 11 Displaced Peoples.

MARCH NEWSLETTER: VOLUME 4, ISSUE 1, 2022

MARCH NEWSLETTER: VOLUME 4, ISSUE 1, 2022

CRN11_Newsletter_Vol4Iss1_03Mar22_FINAL

WELCOME: Volunteer for LSA 2022!

Dear Colleagues:

This is the first quarterly newsletter of the year: Volume 4, Issue 1. Sadly, Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has resulted in some 660,000 refugees and over 2,000 deaths. There have also been reports of racial discrimination directed at African nationals attempting to seek refuge in Poland. As the situation worsens on day seven of the attacks, we want to show our support and stand in solidary with everyone affected.

We hope you are looking forward to the 7th Global Annual Meeting (Rage, Reckoning, & Remedy) of the Law and Society Association in Lisbon, Portugal on 13-16 July 2022. We are in need of volunteers to serve as chairs, discussants, and notetakers for CRN11 sessions. We invite you to express your interest by emailing us at vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca and benders@seattleu.edu. First come, first serve.

CRN 11 is happy to announce the launch of the Migration, Displacement, and Development book series with Rowman and Littlefield (Lexington Books). The interdisciplinary book series critically examines the obstinacy to expand legal protection to displaced peoples beyond the bona fide refugee within local, regional, and international contexts. The book series attracts (emerging and displaced) scholars who boldly critique conventional worldviews as well as those who suggest cutting-edge approaches to addressing and ameliorating the harsh realities of global displacement. For more information, email us at vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca and benders@seattleu.edu.

In closing, we would like to reaffirm our support for all those affected by the Russian invasion of Ukraine.

Veronica Fynn Bruey and Steven Bender

DISPLACED PEOPLES’ RIGHTS AND PROTECTION

The United Nation High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) approach to working with minorities and indigenous peoples. Questionnaire responses submitted by the UN system to the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (UNFPII) in preparation of the 21st Session to be held on 25 April – 6 May 2022, The UNHCR asserts discrimination against national, ethnic, religious and linguistic minorities can be both a driver/cause of displacement and/or statelessness, and it can also impact those who have been displaced or who are stateless. UNHCR thus has a direct interest in the subject of this report and wishes to share some initial, and non-exhaustive, feedback on situations of discrimination against minorities and activities which have been undertaken to promote and protect minority rights. Indigenous peoples and minorities in forced displacement and situations of statelessness are at disproportionately heightened risk of marginalization, discrimination, violence, abuse and exploitation. More information available here.

On 14 March 2022, the 66th session of the Commission on the Status of Women will focus on “Achieving gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls in the context of climate change, environmental and disaster risk reduction policies and programmes,” in alignment with International Women’s Day, with its focus on gender equality and climate action, calling for women and girls’ full participation in decision-making in public life. Among UNFPA priorities is to impart the impact of climate change on sexual and reproductive health and rights, gender-based violence and harmful practices and bodily autonomy and to advocate for gender-sensitive climate resilience to protect and advance progress on the three transformative results. More information available here.

On 1 March 2022, United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights experts sound alarm on serious Papua abuses and call for urgent aid in Indonesia. The UN human rights experts expressed serious concerns about the deteriorating human rights situation in the Indonesian provinces of Papua and West Papua, citing shocking abuses against indigenous Papuans, including child killings, disappearances, torture and mass displacement of people. The experts called for urgent humanitarian access to the region, and urged the Indonesian Government to conduct full and independent investigations into abuses against the indigenous peoples. More information available here.

Security Council vote sets up emergency UN General Assembly session on Ukraine crisis. The United Nations Security Council voted on Sunday (27 February 2022) to call for a rare emergency special session of the 193-member UN General Assembly on Russia’s military operation in Ukraine, which will be held on Monday (28 February 2022). The measure convening the General Assembly session was adopted by a vote of 11 in favor, with Russia voting against, and China, India and the United Arab Emirates abstaining. The request for an urgent meeting by the General Assembly comes after Russia vetoed on Friday a US-led draft Security Council resolution that would have ‘deplored in the strongest terms the Russian Federation’s aggression against Ukraine’. Since the text was procedural, none of the five permanent Council members – China, France, Russia, United Kingdom and the United States – could use their vetoes. The measure needed only nine votes in favor to pass. More information available here.

ON 25 February 2022, in a statement at the end of a three-day trip to Afghanistan, the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) Executive Director, Catherine Russell, said the international community and the de facto authorities must find ways to work together – for the sake of the children of Afghanistan. Decades of conflict, a devastating drought, a collapsing economy and the impact of international sanctions are causing irreparable damage to the children of Afghanistan. In the streets of Kabul, scores of very young children dart in and out of traffic, chasing cars and asking for money. Store shelves and vegetable markets are well stocked, yet hardly anyone can afford to buy. In a hospital in Kandahar, emaciated babies lie motionless two to a bed, too weak to even cry amid a spike in cases of severe acute malnutrition. A 25-year-old mother of five told me that her family subsists on a diet of bread and water. More information is available here.

Remarks of the United Nations (UN) Secretary-General, António Guterres’, to the opening meeting of the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People, in New York on 8 February 2022. The situation in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, continues to pose a significant challenge to international peace and security. The promise of the independence of the Palestinian State remains unfulfilled. Political, economic and security conditions across the Occupied Palestinian Territory are deteriorating as Palestinians experience high levels of dispossession, violence and insecurity. We urgently need to intensify collective efforts to resolve the conflict and end the occupation in line with United Nations resolutions, international law and bilateral agreements. See the full remarks: SG/SM/21136.

CALLS: CRN-11 EVENTS

Webinar: Health and Internal Displacement in the Middle East

“Sexual Violence and Forced Displacement in the Middle East: A Scoping Review” by Dr. Veronica Fynn Bruey, Assistant Professor, Legal Studies, Athabasca University on 11 April 2022, 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (UK). Registration opens here.

Call For Volunteers: LSA 2022 in Lisbon, Portugal

CRN-11 is in need of volunteers as chairs,  discussants, and notetakers for LSA 2022 conference in Lisbon, Portugal. All interested please email vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca  and benders@seattleu.eduDeadline: 10 March 2022

Call for Book Proposal: Migration, Displacement and Development

Veronica Fynn Bruey and Steven Bender as co-editors, have launched the Migration, Displacement, and Development book series with Rowman and Littlefield. The interdisciplinary series critically examines the obstinacy to expand legal protection to displaced peoples beyond the bona fide refugee within local, regional, and international contexts. Extending protection to a wide range of displaced persons, the series promises to address adverse effects on those forced to leave their homes in the name of globalisation by improving the economic, social, and political conditions driving migration in favour of sustaining growth. The series strives for law and policy reform particularly in areas of trade, economy, remittance and aid as well as protecting individual rights to stay home and live a dignified life. If you are interested in turning your research into a full book, email vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca and benders@seattleu.edu.

Call for CRN-11 Newsletter Editor

CRN-11 Newsletter is produced quarterly per annum and must be released by the last day of March, June, September, and December. The Newsletter Editor will be responsible for:

  • Researching and compiling information for the Newsletter,
  • Assisting with the distribution of the Newsletter electronically to subscribers and other social networks,
  • Inviting and showcasing guest blogger written pieces, and
  • Promoting and advertising the Newsletter with the aim of expanding its reach.

To apply, submit a cover letter and CV to vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca  and benders@seattleu.eduApplication Deadline: Open

Call For Volunteers: Advertisement and Promotion Committee

CRN-11 is also recruiting volunteers to lead the Advertisement and Promotion Committee. To apply, submit a cover letter and CV to vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca  and benders@seattleu.edu. Deadline: Open

Become a CRN-11 Research Collaborator

Interested in being a bona fide research collaborator with CRN-11? To apply, submit a cover letter and CV to vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca  and benders@seattleu.edu. Deadline: Open

Invitation to be a Guest Blogger for CRN-11

Do you have an interesting story to tell about internal and international migration and displacement? CRN 11 is eager to share your piece as a guest blogger in our quarterly newsletter.  Submit your stories to vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca and benders@seattleu.edu. Deadline: Open

GENERAL CALLS: UPCOMING EVENTS

Rewriting Jurisprudence: Centring Refugee and Migrant Lived Experience

Rewriting Jurisprudence: Centring Refugee and Migration Lived Experience is an ongoing project. In its first phase, we will be publishing a selection of rewritten judgments as articles in a special issue of a journal. We will then work towards producing a broader range of rewritten judgments for publication as an edited collection. Our strong preference is that these publications will be open access. During the project we will also publish shortened or draft versions as blog posts as a way of ensuring both accessibility and timeliness of contributions. We hope very much that the project will inspire other similar initiatives. To submit and abstractclick here.

Support, Sanctuary, Solidarity: Moving Towards Migrant Justice and Resilience

The Centre for Refugee Studies (CRS), in collaboration with York Centre for Asian Research (YCAR), invites abstract proposals for its 16th annual Student Conference on the theme of “Support, Sanctuary, Solidarity: Moving Towards Migrant Justice and Resilience” on March 4-6, 2022. Registration: opens here.

Seminar Series: Race, Borders, and Global (Im)mobility

This series which runs between 19 January and 9 March 2022 critically interrogates how militarized borders, migration enforcement, and racial orderings continue to be normalized globally. Speakers in this series come from a range of disciplines and will examine global migration through questions of race and racism, coloniality, nationalism, citizenship, belonging, criminalization, and bordering. More information available here

Webinar Series: Haunted by Violence

A reading and conversation about bureaucratic and liberal violence, simultaneous requests for and censorship of refugee voices, and ongoing histories that compel our returns to questions of displacement and refuge. More information available here

High-level meeting on health and migration in the WHO European Region: jointly shaping the vision for the health of refugees and migrants

At a high-level meeting on health and migration, hosted by WHO/Europe on 17-18 March 2022, health ministers and representatives of the 53 Member States of the WHO European Region will meet to discuss strategic priorities for health and migration beyond 2022. Representatives of refugee and migrant groups, partner organizations and the WHO African and Eastern Mediterranean regions will be involved to encourage participatory dialogue and interregional collaboration as part of a whole-of-route approach. More information available here.

In Dialogue: Symposium on the Displacement of Peoples Between Africa and Europe

Join Indiana University at the IU Europe Gateway in Berlin for a symposium on the transnational dynamics and repercussions of the movement of displaced peoples between Africa and Europe. This two-day symposium (18-19 March 2022) seeks to feature scholars, practitioners, activists, members of local refugee communities, and artists in a dialogue that investigates how education, national security, humanitarian aid, social services, policies, economics, children, families, and identities are being impacted in communities in Africa and Europe. More information available here.

Improving the Global Refugee Regime: from theory to practice?

Call for Papers for the 2022 6th Refugee Law Initiative Annual Conference, ‘Improving the Global Refugee Regime: from theory to practice?’ on  29 June – 1 July 2022, which will be run as a virtual event. Please send all paper and panel proposals (of 3-4 papers maximum) for ‘thematic’ and ‘open’ panels to rliconference2022@sas.ac.uk. We welcome proposals from researchers at any stage in their careers and, particularly, from researchers working in or on refugee protection in the global South. More information available here. Deadline: 31 March 2022.

Displacement, Governance and Human Rights

Call for Papers for the FFVT Summer School, ‘Displacement, Governance and Human Rights.’  The interdisciplinary Summer School is hosted by the Centre for Human Rights Erlangen-Nürnberg (CHREN) as a part of “Forced Migration and Refugee Studies: Networking and Knowledge Transfer” (FFVT) and takes place in Nuremberg, Germany, from 10 to 15 July 2022. Participation is open to Master students as well as PhD candidates, Postdocs and junior practitioners of any disciplinary background. More information available here. Deadline: 31 March 2022.

Critical Humanitarianism: Neoliberal Entanglements with the State

This call seeks papers that study the role of nonprofit organisations and its articulation between population management and neoliberalism. Writing retreat at Minjerribah (Stradbroke Island, Queensland, Australia): Monday 30th May 2022 to Thursday 2nd June 2022. For more information email sararguezriva@gmail.com.  Deadline: 20 March 2022.

New Edited Collection on LGBTQI+ Displacement in and from East Africa

Since the early 1990s, political, social and economic instability in East Africa, including long- running conflicts in Sudan, Somalia, Ethiopia and Burundi, has produced high rates of displacement. Movement within and from the region has led to substantial refugee populations being housed in Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda, as well as a large diaspora of East Africans scattered across the globe. More information email queerdisplacementea@gmail.com. Submission Deadline: 1 April 2022.

Writing Workshop on Governance, Conflict Resolution and Climate Change

The Merian Institute for Advanced Studies in Africa (MIASA) seeks to provide Africa-based early career researchers working on the themes of governance, conflict resolution and climate change on the continent with the space and intellectual community to transform a draft paper into a publishable journal piece. The 5-day writing workshop, which will take place on 25-29 April 2022, is designed to provide early career scholars with the opportunity to contribute to knowledge production in one of the three fields of research focus for this workshop: governance, conflict resolution and climate change. More information available here. Details here.

IASFM ’19, San Paolo, Brazil

The 19th International Association for the Study of Forced Migration Conference (IASFM19), with the theme, “Global Issues, Regional Approaches – Contexts, Challenges, Dialogues and Solutions”, will be held from August 1-5 August 2022 and hosted online by Universidade Católica de Santos (UniSantos). More information is available here. Registration: opens here

Asia Pacific Journal of International Humanitarian Law

The Asia-Pacific Journal of International Humanitarian Law is a publication of the Institute of International Legal Studies University of the Philippines Law Center (UP-IILS) and the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC). We invite the submission of articles on subjects related to international humanitarian law, humanitarian policy or

humanitarian action, provided the article has not been published or accepted elsewhere. In order to qualify for submission, an article must either be authored by someone from, or based in, the Asia-Pacific region or, alternatively, be about the Asia-Pacific region. More information is available here. Deadline: rolling 

RESEARCH, AWARDS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND FELLOWSHIPS

Funding Opportunity for Population, Refugee and Migrants NGOs in Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela

This announcement is designed to accompany PRM’s General NGO Guidelines, which contain additional information on PRM’s priorities and NGO funding strategy with which selected organizations must comply. Proposed activities are intended to support Colombian and Venezuelan populations of concern in Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela.  No regional or multi-country application packages will be considered.  Refer to guidelines below for further details.  Because of PRM’s mandate to provide protection, assistance, and sustainable solutions for refugees and victims of conflict, PRM will consider funding only those programs that include a target beneficiary base of at least 50 percent refugees, asylum seekers, and vulnerable migrants. More information is provided here. Deadline: 08 March 2022.

Funding Opportunity for NGOs Programs Benefitting Ethiopia and Kenya

This announcement is designed to accompany PRM’s General NGO Guidelines, which contain additional information on PRM’s priorities and NGO funding strategy with which selected organizations must comply.  Please use both the General NGO Guidelines and this announcement to ensure that your submission is in full compliance with PRM requirements and that the proposed activities are in line with PRM’s priorities.  Submissions that do not reflect the requirements outlined in these guidelines will not be considered. Proposed activities should primarily support refugee populations in Ethiopia and Kenya.  Because of PRM’s mandate to provide protection, assistance, and sustainable solutions for refugees and victims of conflict, PRM will consider funding only those programs that include a target beneficiary base of at least 50 percent refugees. More information is provided here. Deadline: 18 March 2022.

International UN Day of Solidarity with the Palestinian People: Refugees and Conflict Studies

Call for papers by the  Frontiers in Human Dynamics/Political Science. Contributions sought for a research topic on “International UN Day of Solidarity with the Palestinian People: Refugees and Conflict Studies.” More information is provided here. Deadline: 31 March 2022.

Funding Programme Forced Migration

The Gerda Henkel Foundation welcomes research projects that adopt multidisciplinary approaches within this framework. Engaging in comparisons across regions and time periods should also be a priority here. Projects that incorporate intersectional perspectives and issues are highly desirable too. Depending on the research approach taken and possibilities at hand, cooperation with local knowledge-producers (researchers as well as civil society actors), or people affected by displacement within countries of origin or asylum (particularly in the “Global South”), is strongly encouraged. More information is provided here. Deadline: 15 June 2022.

JOB POSTS

IDRC/CRDI Research Chair Professor: Gender in Forced Displacement in Asia

Applications are invited from for a direct-hire in a full-time position as the IDRC Research Chair Professor on Addressing Gender in Forced Displacement in Asia at the Professor level in the Gender and Development Studies program (GDS) in the Department of Development and Sustainability (DDS), School of Environment, Resources and Development (SERD) at the Asian Institute of Technology (AIT), Thailand. More information available here. Deadline: 31 March 2022. 

PUBLICATIONS

Hearing: ‘Liberia: Massaquoi Freed from Jail in Run-Up to Finnish Verdict’

There’s a new surprise in the trial of Gibril Massaquoi. On Wednesday February 16, the Finnish court released this former Sierra Leonean rebel after almost two years in detention. The trial verdict is expected by April 29, and his release is fuelling speculation about a possible acquittal. In an interview with Justice Info on January 24, Massaquoi expressed confidence in the Finnish justice system, but not in the investigators. Access the hearing information here.

New Report: ‘Climate Change: A Threat to Human Wellbeing and Health…’

UN scientists on Monday delivered a stark warning about the impact of climate change on people and the planet, saying that ecosystem collapse, species extinction, deadly heatwaves and floods are among the “dangerous and widespread disruptions” the world will face over the next two decades due to global warming. Access the full report here.

New Report: Integration of Refugees in Portugal: The Role and Practices of Reception Institutions

In Portuguese. Access the full report here.

New Report: ‘Humanitarian Debate: Law, Policy, Action’

Established in 1869, the International Review of the Red Cross is a peer-reviewed journal published by the ICRC and Cambridge University Press. Its aim is to promote reflection on humanitarian law, policy and action in armed conflict and other situations of collective armed violence. A specialized journal in humanitarian law, it endeavours to promote knowledge, critical analysis and development of the law, and contribute to the prevention of violations of rules protecting fundamental rights and values. The Review offers a forum for discussion on contemporary humanitarian action as well as analysis of the causes and characteristics of conflicts so as to give a clearer insight into the humanitarian problems they generate. Finally, the Review informs its readership on questions pertaining to the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement and in particular on the activities and policies of the ICRC. Access the full report here.

Journal Article: ‘Ethical Considerations: Research with People in Situations of Forced Migration’

Research involving people in situations of forced migration deepens our understanding of their experiences and has the potential to inform evidence-based decision-making, but also poses particular ethical challenges and opportunities. This document is intended to provide researchers, community organizations, and people in situa- tions of forced migration with information on the particularities of forced migration contexts to complement established ethical principles and frameworks on research with human subjects more generally. Access the paper here. 

Journal Article: ‘The Current Migrant and Refugee Crisis in Europe: Refugee Reception Centers in South-east Bulgaria’

In this article, we analyzed the current refugee crisis in Europe by discussing its main characteristics within the European context. A comparison between the different routes in Western, Central, and Eastern Mediterranean, the Western Balkans, and in general in South-Eastern Europe was done. As the main research problem, we focused on Bulgaria as an entry gate for the arriving immigrants and we presented the most recent statistics related to the illegal entries in the country. Among our objectives was the analysis of the current problems at the reception centers in South-Eastern part of Bulgaria. Access the paper here.

Journal Article: ‘Understanding Integration Experience and Wellbeing of Economic-Asylum Seekers in Italy: The Case of Nigerian Immigrants’

The literature on migrants’ integration and wellbeing is ample, but the case of economic-asylum seekers in a protracted asylum application system is yet to receive sufficient attention. The economic-asylum seekers are a unique group who migrate with an economic motive but apply for asylum to achieve economic integration in the host country. We use the aspiration-capability framework and a mixed-method approach: participant observation, focus group discussion, and field survey, to study a group of economic-asylum seekers from Nigeria when they were waiting for their asylum decisions in Italy. We find that they evaluate their wellbeing by reflecting on their premigration aspirations, integration constraints, and capabilities. Access the paper here.

Journal Article: ‘Generalised Push-back Practices in Europe: The Right to Seek Asylum is a Fundamental Right’

In recent years, more and more asylum seekers trying to reach the European Union (EU) have found themselves subjected to practices that contradict the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights and the democratic principles within the Dublin III Regulation. The inalienable right of those individuals to seek asylum is violated every time that the Member States’ national authorities subject them to irregular procedures and deny them their right to international protection without an individual assessment of their asylum claims. These practices are defined as push-backs. Access the paper here.

Journal Article: ‘SARS-CoV-2 attack rate in reception and accommodation centres for asylum seekers during the first wave: Systematic review of outbreak media reports in Germany’

Despite concerns about the impact of the severe acute respiratory syndrome corona virus (SARS-CoV-2) in refugee camps, data on attack rates and effectiveness of containment measures are lacking. We aimed to (1) quantify the attack rate of SARS-CoV-2 during outbreaks in reception and accommodation centres in Germany during the first pandemic wave, (2) assess differences in the attack rate based on containment measures, and (3) provide an overview of testing strategies, communication, conflicts, and protection measures for refugees with special needs. Access the paper here.

Journal Article: ‘Turkish and Libyan Refugee Deals: A Critical Analysis of the European Union’s Securitarian Irregular Migration Policy’

This article critically analyzed the Turkish and Libyan refugee deals. We argued that these deals proved to be unsustainable policy frameworks by focusing on their practical outcomes regarding humanitarian objectives. We utilized the ‘Fortress Europe’ concept to demonstrate how the European Union’s security concerns shaped the framework of these deals. Our study elaborated on two main arguments: First, these deals have undermined both Turkey and Libya’s migration management capacities. Second, these deals failed to provide adequate mechanisms supervising the enforcement of humanitarian objectivesAccess the paper here.

Journal Article: ‘The impact of COVID-19 on the living and survival conditions of internally displaced persons in Burkina Faso’

In recent years, as in other parts of the Sahel, the threat of terrorism has escalated in Burkina Faso. In 2019, this country hosted the fourth highest number of new conflict-related internal displaced persons (IDPs) in the world. These people have to cope simultaneously with the full spectrum of environmental, social and health-related stresses in the long, medium and short term, respectively. We seek to compare the living conditions of IDPs before and during the lockdown implemented by the authorities (between 27 March and 5 May 2020) to contain the spread of the virus. Access the paper here.

Journal Article: ‘The ramification of Cameroon’s Anglophone crisis: conceptual analysis of a looming “Complex Disaster Emergency”’

One of Africa’s newest struggles for liberation: Cameroon’s Anglophone crisis, which emerged from legal and education grievances in 2016, rapidly escalated into a secessionist political conflict that is threatening the unity of the country, with potential to degenerate into a complex emergency. In an exploratory, qualitative, analytical, and descriptive case study research tradition involving document/content analysis, we apply the Robert Strauss Centre’s complex emergency framework to investigate the potential of the Anglophone crisis, whose ramifications lead us to consider it an acute complex emergency. Our contention is based on the fact that 72.5% of the variables in all the complex emergencies fall within the relevant to extremely relevant ranking criteria. Access the paper here.

Journal Article: ‘Environmental Displacement in the Anthropocene’

This intervention invites more substantial scholarly attention to human displacement in and of the Anthropocene—this current epoch in which humans have become the primary drivers of global environmental change—and sets out an initial framework for its study. The framework is organized around interrelated contributions. First is the recognition that displacement is driven not just by climate change but also broader forms of environmental change defining the Anthropocene, including biodiversity loss, changes to land and water resources, and the buildup of nuclear debris, along with their intersections. Second, the framework parses out three distinct moments of displacement in the Anthropocene: displacement as a consequence of, prerequisite to, and active response to environmental change. Access the paper here. 

Journal Article: ‘Suicide Attempts Among Adult Eritrean Refugees in Tigray, Ethiopia: Prevalence and Associated Factors’

The present study assessed the prevalence of and factors associated with suicide attempts among adult Eritrean refugees in Tigray, Ethiopia. Access the paper here.

Journal Articles: ‘Special Issue: Displaced Syrians’

Access the articles here. 

Journal Articles: ‘Special Issue on New Demographic Directions in Forced Migrant and Refugee Research’

Access the articles here.

Journal Articles: ‘Special Issue on Displacement and Dispossessions’

Access the articles here.

Journal Articles: ‘Externalisation/Mobility and Agency in Protracted Displacement’

Access the articles here.

Journal Articles: ‘Migrants, refugees, and displaced persons in the Middle East and North Africa’

Access the articles here.

Journal Articles: ‘Journal of Internal Displacement, Volume 12, Issue 1’

Access the articles here.

New Book: ‘Refugees and Knowledge Production’

Building on research within the fields of exile studies and critical migration studies and drawing links between historical and contemporary ‘refugee scholarship’, this volume challenges the bias of methodological nationalism and Eurocentrism in discussing the multifaceted forms of knowledge emerging in the context of migration and mobility. With critical attention to the meaning, production and scope of ‘refugee scholarship’ generated at the institutions of higher education, it also focuses on ‘refugee knowledge’ produced outside academia, and scrutinizes the conditions according to which it is validated or silenced. Access the book here.

New Book: ‘Christianity and the Law of Migration’

The collection brings together legal scholars and Christian theologians for an interdisciplinary conversation responding to the challenges of global migration. Gathering 14 leading scholars from both law and Christian theology, the book covers legal perspectives, theological perspectives, and key concepts in migration studies. Access the book here.

New Book: ‘Gender, Identity and Migration in India’

The book focuses on voices of displaced women who constitute a critical part of the migration process through an unravelling of the engendered displacement. It draws attention to the various processes, methods and approaches by national and international human rights and humanitarian laws and principles, and the experiences of the relevant communities, organisations towards peaceful co-existence. The contributions to this volume embellish the argument that there is a direct correlation between an academic researcher’s positionality, methods and trajectories of critical knowledge production. Access the book here.

New Book: ‘Asylum as Reparation: Refuge and Responsibility for the Harms of Displacement’

This book argues that states have a special obligation to offer asylum as reparation to refugees for whose flight they are responsible. It shows the great relevance of reparative justice and the importance of the causes of contemporary forced migration for our understanding of states’ responsibilities to refugees. Access the book here.

New Book: ‘Mediated Lives: Waiting and Hope Among Iraqi Refugees in Jordan

Using the example of Iraqi refugees in Jordan’s capital of Amman, this book describes how information and communication technologies (ICTs) play out in the everyday experiences of urban refugees, geographically located in the Global South, and shows how interactions between online and offline spaces are key for making sense of the humanitarian regime, for carving out a sense of home and for sustaining hope. This book paints a humanizing account of making do amid legal marginalization, prolonged insecurity, and the proliferation of digital technologies. Access the book here.

New Book: ‘Forced Displacement and NGOs in Asia and the Pacific’

This volume presents a comprehensive survey of the dynamics of conflict and climate induced forced displacement and organisational response across Asia and the Pacific. The Asia Pacific region hosts some of the largest numbers of displaced people on the planet, with some of the fewest protections available and sparse frameworks for advancing rights, livelihood, and policy. The region maintains the lowest number of signatory states to international refugee protection covenants, and the majority of national protection and support systems are ad hoc, precarious, and unpredictable. Access the book here. 

New Book: ‘Documenting Displacement: Questioning Methodological Boundaries in Forced Migration Research’

Documenting Displacement explores the ethics and methods of research in diverse forced migration contexts and proposes new ways of thinking about and documenting displacement. Each chapter delves into specific ethical and methodological challenges, with particular attention to unequal power relations in the co-creation of knowledge, questions about representation and ownership, and the adaptation of methodological approaches to contexts of mobility. Contributors reflect honestly on what has worked and what has not, providing useful points of discussion for future research by both established and emerging researchers. Access the book here.

New Book Chapter: ‘What Shapes the Narratives on Internally Displaced People in Dnipro Media?’

Long thought of as unthinkable in Ukraine, the issue of IDPs suddenly appeared on the agenda during the 2014 crisis. Scholarly literature and the media firstly looked on their lives and problems through the lens of temporariness. However, when displacement lasts longer than five years, it is worth looking deeper into this issue through the perspective of protracted displacement, not only through issues of survival and coping strategies, but considering the refusal to return and (forced or conscious) integration with a view to a long-term coexistence in their new environment. Although like Georgia (Brun, 2016), which suffered from two internal wars in South Ossetia and Abkhazia, Ukrainian society strives to maintain people with their IDP status because their existence and possible return to the Donbas symbolizes the hope of regaining control over occupied territories. Access the chapter here.

Book Review: ‘Entangled Territorialities: Negotiating Indigenous Lands in Australia and Canada

Entangled Territorialities evidently validate Indigenous peoples ongoing struggle (“entanglements”) land dispossession and forced displacement as a result of colonisation and imposition of settler laws. The book serves as a critical dialogue, theoretical framework, and practical tool for teachers, researchers, lawyers, practitioners, and community advocates of Indigenous customary land rights. Access the review here.

Briefing Paper: ‘COVID-19 and Social and Economic Rights of Migrants in Mali’

Produced with the support of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), this analysis specifically sets out the challenges faced by migrants with regard to economic and social rights in the COVID-19 context. This analysis will inform OHCHR’s actions, and also serve as a basis for future activities of the PROMIS project, a UNODC-OHCHR joint initiative aimed at promoting a human rights-based response to smuggling of migrants and to effectively respond to human rights violations related to irregular migration in West Africa. Access the brief here.

Policy Brief: ‘Networks of Care for Displaced LGBTQ+ People: How the United States Can Support LGBTQ+-led Organizations in Central America and Mexico

LGBTQ+ people in Central America are often at heightened risk of violence and discrimination, and thousands have fled their home countries in search of international protection. While the United States remains a major destination for displaced LGBTQ+ people, increasingly, more and more LGBTQ+ people on the move are heading to countries within the region to seek protection. Protection systems in the region are improving but need strengthening. LGBTQ+-led organizations in Central America are often leaders in these systems, providing protection, support, and advocacy for and on behalf of LGBTQ+ people in their countries of origin, while on the move, and in their destination countries. Access the brief here.

Magazine: ‘The Spaces in Between: Social Memory at Dzaleka Refugee Camp’

In the relatively small, Southeast African nation of Malawi is the multiethnic, multilingual community of Dzaleka Refugee Camp. Refugees at the camp are predominantly from Burundi, the Democratic Republic of Congo (D.R.C.), and Rwanda, with minority communities from Somalia and a few other countries. Swahili has emerged as the lingua franca of the camp with Lingala, French, Kinyarwanda and Kirundi also being spoken. Established in 1994 following the Rwandan genocide, most of its current residents fled various conflicts in the African Great Lakes region. The camp was previously a maximum-security prison; the name Dzaleka comes from the Chichewa phrase N’dzaleka which means ‘I will never do it again’. Many residents have lived in the camp for years, making it a de facto protracted refugee situation hosting over 46,000 residents.  Access the article here.

Blog Post: ‘The New Humanitarian Crisis for Afghans: Access to Asylum’

Rapid changes that happened in the political scene of Afghanistan from April to August 2021, pushed the country to becoming the largest humanitarian crisis in the world in less than 6 months, affecting multiple countries such as Iran, Pakistan and Tajikistan. Thousands of people were displaced, internally or into neighbouring countries. However, compared to the last similar displacement crisis – the Syrian displacement of 2015 – the EU did not face an influx; only a total of 22,000 Afghans were evacuated to the EU. Access the post here.

Blog Post: ‘Flooding Displacement in Malawi: Policy Practice and Prevention’

Malawi has been blessed with a peaceful history. While much of Africa remains embroiled in civil war and sectarian violence that leaves millions displaced, Malawi has not suffered prolonged political violence since the independence struggle. This has made conflict displacement rare—indeed, Malawi has long been a host for refugees from other nations such as Mozambique. However, the country’s geography makes it prone to adverse weather conditions. Access the post here.

Blog Post: ‘The Dom in Lebanon: Citizens, Migrants, Refugees and Nomads’

The Dom are an ethnic minority group who currently reside in several countries throughout the MENA region, including Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, Iraq, Gaza, the West Bank, Egypt and Turkey. Historians and linguistic theorists have found that the Dom’s language, referred to as Domari, derives from an Indo-Aryan language. They insist that the Dom are descendants of a group of itinerant ethnic groups, called the Roma (Romani) people and Lom people. Access the post here.

E-Learning: ‘3rd Online Course on Statelessness’

The Course responds to the need of increased knowledge and capacity to prevent, reduce and resolve statelessness and to protect stateless persons worldwide. The curriculum of the Course ranges from the adoption of the Statelessness international conventions and development of national legislation to the work with stateless persons in the field. Access the course here.

E-Learning: ‘1st Summer School on Internal Displacement in the Middle East: Crisis, Displacement and Protection’

This five-day Summer School offers up to 40 participants from academia, government and civil society in the Middle East a firm understanding of the crisis of internal displacement in the region. Focusing on countries with protracted internal displacement dynamics, the School addresses the situation of internally displaced persons (IDPs) in the Middle East, the challenges that this issue presents, key elements of the humanitarian and development response and the legal and policy frameworks, and the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on IDPs. Access the course here.

Panel Discussion: ‘Fortress Europe and the Syrian Refugee Crisis’

The devastating conflict that caused immense suffering in Syria is now over a decade old, but while the humanitarian and political crisis are far from over, international interest in Syria has been waning. The panel discussion Fortress Europe and the Syrian refugee crisis intends to stimulate critical reflection and debate on the dilemmas facing humanitarian and medical action in the Syrian conflict. Access the video here.

Short Video: ‘Cruel, Costly and Ineffective: The Failure of Offshore Processing in Australia’

Australia’s multi-billion-dollar offshore processing system has demonstrably failed to stop boats, save lives or break the business model of people smugglers, according to a new policy brief from UNSW’s Kaldor Centre for International Refugee Law, ‘Cruel, costly and ineffective: The failure of offshore processing in Australia’, authored by the Kaldor Centre’s, Senior Research Fellow Madeline Gleeson, and international refugee lawyer and scholar Natasha Yacoub. Access the video here.

Research Guide: ‘What is Human Trafficking’

Human trafficking is a phenomenon that has been around for decades but that has recently taken the news and society in general by storm. As more and more people become aware of this terrible crime, it’s important to understand and be aware of the dangers and implications that come with this exploitation. It’s also important to know how to protect yourself as well as recognize human trafficking when possible. Access the guide here.

Information Sheet: ‘Your Rights in Research’

Taking part in a research project gives you a chance to make your voice heard, but it can also be inconvenient, cost you time or money, and/or make you feel physically or emotionally uncomfortable. This information sheet explains key terms and outlines your rights. Access the info sheet here.

Code of Ethics: ‘Critical Reflections on Research Ethics in Situations of Forced Migration’

Research with people in situations of forced migration poses particular ethical challenges because of unequal power relations, legal precariousness, extreme poverty, violence, the criminalization of migration, politicized research contexts, the policy relevance of our research and/or dependence on government and non-governmental services and funding. However, Research Ethics Boards (REBs) are not always aware of these particular ethical issues; some countries and institutions do not have REBs; and some kinds of research are not subject to REB approval. Access the Code of Ethics here.

ANNOUNCEMENTS, CAMPAIGNS, AND ALERTS

A Health Provider’s Role in Fighting Human Trafficking

Human trafficking, a form of modern slavery that exploits people for labor and sex, affects about 24.9 million victims worldwide, the U.S. State Department estimates. And the majority of victims will encounter the health care system during their time being trafficked. Health care providers are uniquely positioned to identify and help human trafficking victims because of the likelihood they will come into contact with victims—particularly in urgent care settings, said forensic nurse Diana Faugno, MSN, RN, CPN. More information is available here.

What is Human Trafficking

Human trafficking is a phenomenon that has been around for decades but that has recently taken the news and society in general by storm. As more and more people become aware of this terrible crime, it’s important to understand and be aware of the dangers and implications that come with this exploitation. It’s also important to know how to protect yourself as well as recognize human trafficking when possible. More information is available here.

IN THE NEWS

African Business, Maternal and reproductive health-care crisis in Ethiopia (3 March 2022).

Ating Enwongo, How internally displaced persons will vote in 2023-INEC (3 March 2022).

The Irrawaddy, Myanmar Junta planes bumb village sheltering displaced Karenni civilians (28 February 2022).

Aljazeera, Forced displacement in Colombia more than doubled in 2021: Report (16 February 2022).

Aljazeera, Madagascar: Death toll from Cyclone Batsirai rises to 120 (11 February 2022).

Norwegian Refugee Council, Renewed conflict in Ukraine would trigger massive displacement (03 February 2022).

Sertan Sanderson, Why do migrants try to come to the United Kingdom? (31 January 2022).

Maggie McCullough, Rising home sale prices and the risk of renter displacement (31 January 2022).

Harriet Barber, Tropical storm Ana wreaks havoc across southern Africa (28 January 2022).

Melissa Gater, Novak Djokovic was detained for five days – refugees in the same hotel have been there for years (24 January 2022).

Madeleine Gleeson, Australia’s asylum policy has been a disaster. It’s deeply disturbing the UK wants to adopt it (07 December 2021). 

SEND US YOUR NEWS AND EVENTS

Displaced Peoples (CRN11) newsletter is published quarterly.  The newsletter is a venue for sharing information regarding displaced peoples, broadly defined. Your contribution to the newsletter is crucial to its sustenance, success and quality. To contribute to the newsletter, please contact Veronica Fynn Bruey and Steven Bender: vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca and benders@seattleu.edu. To subscribe or unsubscribe, visit CRN 11 Displaced Peoples.

DECEMBER/END OF YEAR NEWSLETTER: VOLUME 3, ISSUE 4, 2021

DECEMBER/END OF YEAR NEWSLETTER: VOLUME 3, ISSUE 4, 2021

CRN11_Newsletter_Vol3Iss4_31Dec21_FINAL

WELCOME: HAPPY NEW YEAR!

Dear Colleagues:

This is the last quarterly newsletter of the year: CRN 11 End of Year 2021 Newsletter: Volume 3, Issue 4. This year has been challenging for many of you with the ongoing global pandemic and its variants. If you lost a family member or friend, please accept our heartfelt condolences. Otherwise, we really hope you and your family are keeping safe as the year comes to an end.

We are still excited about the Law and Society Annual Meeting in Lisbon, Portugal, 13-16 July 2022. The 7th Global Meeting on Law and Society: Rage, Reckoning, & Remedy will be held both in-person and virtually. Early registration opened on 16 December 2021 and will close on 7 January 2022. Watch this space for more information on CRN-11 specific presentations during the 7th Global Meeting on Law and Society.

CRN 11 is committed to advocating for the rights and protection of displaced peoples through this medium. We are seeking a newsletter editor who will commit to producing the quarterly newsletters for 2022. Consider applying and joining us today!

CRN 11 is happy to announce the launch of the Migration, Displacement, and Development book series with Rowman and Littlefield. The interdisciplinary book series critically examines the obstinacy to expand legal protection to displaced peoples beyond the bona fide refugee within local, regional, and international contexts. The book series strives for law and policy reform and will attract scholars who boldly critique conventional worldviews as well as those who suggest cutting-edge approaches to addressing and ameliorating the harsh realities of global displacement.

In closing, we affirm our support for survivors, families, loved ones, and friends of the recent “clashes between herders, fishermen, and farmers in the far north of Cameroon which have displaced at least 100,000 people from their homes in two weeks.”

Veronica Fynn Bruey and Steven Bender

DISPLACED PEOPLES’ RIGHTS AND PROTECTION

On 9 December 2021, with equality as the focus for Human Rights Day 2021, 14 women from Costa Rica were brought together at a human rights and music camp to identify common challenges. Negative discrimination, gender violence, inequality and lack of opportunities were all discussed. Responses were identified, as were approaches for more effective advocacy to decision-makers. The camp took place from 22 to 26 November and was conducted by Sara Curruchich, a Kaqchikel Mayan singer-songwriter from Guatemala, and not-for-profit Costa Rican record label We Could Be Music (WCBM).

On 3 November 2021, Members of the Inter-Agency Standing Committee urge Governments at COP26 in Glasgow to step up support to people most at risk and vulnerable to the devastating effects of the climate crisis. As humanitarian organizations, we have witnessed for years how climate change is placing millions of lives at risk and creating unprecedented humanitarian needs. In the last 20 months alone, more than 658 million people have been exposed to extreme-temperature events, while climate-related disasters have killed more than 17,200 people and affected the lives and livelihoods of at least 139 million. More information available here.

On 21 December 2021, after Typhoon Odette (international name Rai) brought widespread destruction to the Philippines on 16 December, the needs of children and families in affected areas are becoming clear. Based on initial assessments, around 845,000 children need urgent assistance. Immediate needs include food, water, medicines, clothing, Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), cooking equipment, family kits with sleeping materials, hygiene kits, temporary shelter, disaster kits, tents for healthcare facilities and go bags. More information is available here.

In 2020, the UNODC, with support and funding from the Government of Germany, initiated the project ‘Public-Private Partnerships: Fostering Engagement with the Private Sector on the Implementation of the UN Convention against Transnational Organized Crime (UNTOC) and its Trafficking in Persons Protocol’ (‘PPP Project’). This PPP Project aims to improve a partnership between the public and private sectors with a view to better assisting member States in their implementation of the UNTOC and its Trafficking in Persons Protocol. The main outcome of the PPP project is the drafting of a Compendium of Promising Practices on PPPs. Download the compendium here.

On 16 December 2021, the UN General Assembly adopts an annual resolution on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. This resolution was approved by the Third Committee (Social, Humanitarian and Cultural) on 12 November 2021.  Bolivia and Ecuador were the co-facilitators for the resolution. See the resolution document: A/76/459).

CALLS: CRN-11 EVENTS

Expression of Interest: Migration, Displacement and Development Book Series

Veronica Fynn Bruey and Steven Bender as co-editors, have launched the Migration, Displacement, and Development book series with Rowman and Littlefield. The interdisciplinary series critically examines the obstinacy to expand legal protection to displaced peoples beyond the bona fide refugee within local, regional, and international contexts. Extending protection to a wide range of displaced persons, the series promises to address adverse effects on those forced to leave their homes in the name of globalisation by improving the economic, social, and political conditions driving migration in favour of sustaining growth. The series strives for law and policy reform particularly in areas of trade, economy, remittance and aid as well as protecting individual rights to stay home and live a dignified life. If you are interested in turning your research into a full book, email vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca and benders@seattleu.edu.

Call for CRN-11 Newsletter Editor

CRN-11 Newsletter is produced quarterly per annum and must be released on the last day of March, June, September, and December. The Newsletter Editor will be responsible for:

  • Researching and compiling information for the Newsletter,
  • Assisting with the distribution of the Newsletter electronically to subscribers and other social networks,
  • Inviting and showcasing guest blogger written pieces, and
  • Promoting and advertising the Newsletter with the aim of expanding its reach.

To apply, submit a cover letter and CV to vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca  and benders@seattleu.eduApplication Deadline: Open

Call For Volunteers: LSA 2022 in Lisbon, Portugal

CRN-11 is in need of volunteers as chairs,  discussants, and notetaker for LSA 2022 conference in Lisbon, Portugal. All interested please email vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca  and benders@seattleu.eduDeadline: Open

Call For Volunteers: Advertisement and Promotion Committee

CRN-11 is also recruiting volunteers to lead the Advertisement and Promotion Committee. To apply, submit a cover letter and CV to vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca  and benders@seattleu.edu. Deadline: Open

Become a CRN-11 Research Collaborator

Interested in being a bona fide research collaborator with CRN-11? To apply, submit a cover letter and CV to vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca  and benders@seattleu.edu. Deadline: Open

Invitation to be a Guest Blogger for CRN-11

Do you have an interesting story to tell about internal and international migration and displacement? CRN 11 is eager to share your piece as a guest blogger in our quarterly newsletter.  Submit your stories to vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca and benders@seattleu.edu. Deadline: Open

GENERAL CALLS: UPCOMING CONFERENCES

IASFM ’19, San Paolo, Brazil, 2022

The 19th International Association for the Study of Forced Migration Conference (IASFM19), with the theme, “Global Issues, Regional Approaches – Contexts, Challenges, Dialogues and Solutions”, will be held from August 1-5 August 2022 and hosted online by Universidade Católica de Santos (UniSantos). More information is available here. Deadline: 31 January 2022

UN Voluntary Trust Fund for Victims of Trafficking in Persons

The UN Voluntary Trust Fund for Victims of Trafficking in Persons has launched the sixth Call for Proposals (Sub-grant Programme 1) on 17 December 2021. More information available here. Deadline: 31 January 2022.

Call for Nominations – Membership of UNPFII 2023-2025

The Permanent Forum serves as an advisory body to the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) with a mandate to discuss indigenous issues relating to economic and social development, culture, environment, education, health, and human rights. The Permanent Forum holds annual sessions of ten working days each year, generally in April-May. Indigenous peoples’ organizations are invited to submit nominations for the membership of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues 2023-2025. More information available here. Deadline: 25 January 2022.

Changing Migration, Migration in Change, Berlin, 2022

The 25th International Metropolis Conference Berlin, Changing Migration, Migration in Change, will be held at the Berlin Congress Center in Germany on 4-9 September 2022. Migration is changing. Complex interconnections between technology and digitisation, climate and demographic change, and political unrest are creating a constant state of flux for patterns of, and issues concerning, international migration. The COVID-19 pandemic is an additional challenge. The Conference will consider these challenges. More information is available here.

Support, Sanctuary, Solidarity: Moving Towards Migrant Justice and Resilience 2022

The Centre for Refugee Studies (CRS), in collaboration with York Centre for Asian Research (YCAR), invites abstract proposals for its 16th annual Student Conference on the theme of “Support, Sanctuary, Solidarity: Moving Towards Migrant Justice and Resilience” on March 4-6, 2022. Deadline: 10 January 2022. More information is available here.

In Dialogue: Symposium on the Displacement of Peoples Between Africa and Europe, 2022

Join Indiana University at the IU Europe Gateway in Berlin for a symposium on the transnational dynamics and repercussions of the movement of displaced peoples between Africa and Europe. This two-day symposium (18-19 March 2022) seeks to feature scholars, practitioners, activists, members of local refugee communities, and artists in a dialogue that investigates how education, national security, humanitarian aid, social services, policies, economics, children, families, and identities are being impacted in communities in Africa and Europe. More information available here.

Improving the Global Refugee Regime: from theory to practice?, 2022

Call for Papers for the 2022 6th Refugee Law Initiative Annual Conference, ‘Improving the Global Refugee Regime: from theory to practice?’ on  29 June – 1 July 2022, which will be run as a virtual event. Please send all paper and panel proposals (of 3-4 papers maximum) for ‘thematic’ and ‘open’ panels
to rliconference2022@sas.ac.uk. We welcome proposals from researchers at any stage in their careers and, particularly, from researchers working in or on refugee protection in the global South. More information available here. Deadline: 31 March 2022.

RESEARCH, AWARDS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND FELLOWSHIPS

Sanctuary Scholarship for People Seeking Asylum and Refugees with Temporary Protection

The Sanctuary Scholarship for People Seeking Asylum and Refugees with Temporary Protection has been established to support talented students who are asylum seekers or refugees on temporary visas with the opportunity to pursue tertiary education at UNSWAustralia. Students who are asylum seekers or refugees on temporary visas with a genuine interest and passion to undertake studies at UNSW are strongly encouraged to apply for this Scholarship. More information is provided here. Deadline: 12 January 2022.

PUBLICATIONS

Hearing: ‘The Asylum Commission Held Hearing
A hearing where people who applied for asylum during the period 2015-2017 could tell their experiences of coming to Sweden was held recently. It was arranged in Stockholm by Linköping University in collaboration with a number of voluntary organizations. Access the hearing document here.

New Report: ‘Waiting is Not an Option’
A Call for Repatriation of Foreign Citizens in Northeast Syria. Repatriate the Children Sweden calls for immediate action for governments to repatriate all their citizens as one measure to protect children and other citizens — in Syria, Iraq and elsewhere — from being victims of war. Additionally, Repatriate the Children Sweden calls for the Autonomous Administration of North and East Syria to release all detainees requested by governments who guarantee to receive them. Access the full report here.

New Report: ‘World Migration Report 2022’
Since 2000, IOM has been producing its flagship world migration reports every two years. The World Migration Report 2022, the eleventh in the world migration report series, has been produced to contribute to increased understanding of migration and mobility throughout the world. This new edition presents key data and information on migration as well as thematic chapters on highly topical migration issues. Access the full report here.

New Report: ‘“I Didn’t Feel Like a Human in There,” Immigration Detention in Canada and its Impact on Mental Health’
Despite its reputation as a refugee-welcoming and multicultural country, Canada incarcerates thousands of people on immigration-related grounds every year, including people who are fleeing persecution, those seeking employment and a better life, and people who have lived in Canada since childhood. Figures from the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) reveal that the number of immigration detainees incarcerated in Canada has in- creased every fiscal year between 2016-17 and 2019-20, peaking in fiscal year 2019-20 with a total of 8,825 people in immigration detention. For many detainees, not knowing how long they will be detained causes trauma, distress, and a sense of powerlessness. Access the full report here.

New Report: ‘No Shelter from the Storm: The Urgent Need to Recognise and Protect Climate Refugees’
Since 2008, weather-related hazards have displaced over 21 million people each year on average. This figure does not include those forced to leave home due to slow-onset climate impacts, such as desertification and sea level rise. Most of the world’s climate refugees come from vulnerable communities in lower-income countries, where environmental degradation and climate change intersects with and exacerbates other stressors such as poverty, oppression, and conflict. Access the full report here.

Policy Paper: ‘Seizing the Opportunity for a Coherent Refugee Policy!’
Over the past few weeks, the world watched in horror as the Taliban rapidly took over Afghanistan. Greatly underestimated by many, the capture of Kabul caused great consternation on the part of the international community – even more so: complete helplessness. Access the paper here.

Policy Brief: ‘Dire Consequences: Addressing the Humanitarian Fallout from Myanmar’s Coup’
Nine months have passed since the coup in Myanmar, and the country’s humanitarian outlook is increasingly dire. Amid the throes of the COVID-19 pandemic and a growing economic crisis, the military junta’s crackdown on dissent has resulted in the killing of more than 1,100 civilians and the forcible displacement of more than 200,000 people and has left an estimated 3 million people in need of humanitarian assistance. This brief details the current situation in Myanmar and the complex geo-political dynamics hampering much-needed action, and recommends steps Myanmar’s neighbors, ASEAN countries, donor countries, and the United States must take to address the crisis and provided aid and safety to those in need. Access the paper here.

Policy Brief: ‘Canada’
This first Canadian report draws solely on desk research findings. Some of the policy recommendations are subject to revision, following interviews with civil servants and practitioners. Others reflect long-standing issues in the Canadian context. Access the paper here.

Journal Article: ‘Social Work Law in Nexus with Migration Law. A Legal Cartographic Analysis of Inter-legal Spaces of Inclusion and Exclusion in Swedish Legislation’
This article departs from the promise frequently put forward, that social work is a profession committed to human rights. In a Swedish context, this commitment is manifested in ethical guidelines as well as national law referring to rights such as the right to ‘a reasonable living standard’. Access the paper here.

Journal Article: ‘Pushed Out in Limbo – The Every-day Decision-making about ‘Practical Impediments to Enforcement’ in the Swedish Management of Return Migration’
This article presents a study of the contradiction between the rhetoric of return, stressing that rejected asylum seekers should leave the country, and the reality of how migrants end up as legally stranded, in Sweden. Through a qualitative analysis of; 25 decisions by the Swedish Migration Agency, an internal quality report about the legal application, and the documentation in two complete individual casefiles, the study reveals assessments of facts which, combined with legal interpretations, push people out in social and economic destitution, i.e. they become superfluous with no right to residency and no way to leave Sweden. Access the paper here

Journal Article: ‘Anxiety, Ambivalence, and the Violence of Expectations: Migrant Reception and Resettlement in Sicily’
Throughout Europe, the arrival of irregular migrants in recent years has triggered the expression of nativist anxieties, witnessing a broad recourse to violent rhetoric and the embrace of exclusivist models of national and regional community. With an ethnographic focus on migrant resettlement in Sicily, this paper argues that the elaboration of a cosmopolitan ethic that rejects the politics of exclusion can be met with ambivalence by local people who share neither the middle-class sensibilities of refugee advocates, nor their access to the public funds by which it is possible to earn income as social service and resettlement workers. Access the paper here.

Journal Articles: ‘Forced Migration Current Awareness: Regional Focus on Africa Part 1’
A service highlighting open access reports & scholarly materials relating to refugees, asylum-seekers, internally displaced persons (IDPs), and other forced migrants; provided by Elisa Mason. Access the resources here.

Journal Articles: ‘Forced Migration Current Awareness: Regional Focus on Africa Part 2’
A service highlighting open access reports & scholarly materials relating to refugees, asylum-seekers, internally displaced persons (IDPs), and other forced migrants; provided by Elisa Mason. Access the resources here.

Journal Articles: Politics and Governance Open Access Journal ‘Migration and Refugee Flows: New Insights’
Access the Articles here.

Journal Article: ‘The Healer as the Enemy: Attaching Health Care in War’
Violence against health care in war has shocked the global public conscience over the past decade. Images of attacks on hospitals from Syria have been especially disturbing. Documentaries such as The New BarbarianismFor Sama, and The Cave, the latter two from Syria, provide gripping accounts of the plight of hospitals and health workers under attack. Scholarship on health-care attacks has not been extensive. Access the paper here.

Journal Article: ‘Local Integration as a Durable Solution? Negotiating Socioeconomic Spaces between Refugees and Host Communities in Rural Northern Uganda’
With a growing number of displaced people, there is a need for robust approaches to coping with displacement. Uganda has a progressive refugee policy that promotes freedom of movement and the socioeconomic rights of the refugees. Specifically, refugees are often allocated land to settle and cultivate rural settlements, and the integrated social service provision facilitates interaction with host communities. However, there remain challenges in creating sustainable livelihoods for refugees in rural settlements. There exist significant tensions over shared resources such as land, water, woodlots, and grazing areas. Access the paper here.

Journal Article: ‘Rebirthing the Violent Past: Friction Between Post-Conflict Axioms of Remembrance and Cambodian Buddhist’
Problematising the vernacularisation of key mechanisms in post-conflict Human Rights (HR) regimes, ethnographic interviews with Cambodian interlocutors present resistance to victim-perpetrator outreach and reconciliation, truth telling, and memorialisation. Resistance stems from the incommensurability between Buddhist present and future-focused perspectives and Euro Western (EW) past-focused memory work so central to the above mechanisms of post-conflict reconciliation. The vernacularisation of EW memory work is not only perceived as culturally incongruent, but appears to threaten a resurgence of genocide-related distress and strife that the HR regime hoped to assuage. Access the paper here.

Journal Article: ‘Tracing Invisibility as a Colonial Project: Indigenous Women Who Seek Asylum at the U.S.-Mexico Border’
In the United States, Central American Indigenous women who seek asylum are officially classified as Latinas or Hispanic. The erasure and consequent invisibility of Indigenous identity not only causes assimilation but also jeopardizes Central American Indigenous women’s procedural rights. Using a transnational feminist lens combined with a Critical Latinx Indigeneities framework, and drawing on fieldwork research, I address the complex relationships of migrants whose identities are intertwined with geography, different states, and racial representations, while I claim that the invisibility of Indigenous women from Abya Yala who cross borders responds to the white settler colonial project. Access the paper here.

Journal Article: ‘Visitor Visa Policy Changes and Mexico-Canada Migration’
Although recent scholarship shows that restrictive visa policies curtail migration, research does not disaggregate policy effects within migration flows. This article analyzes Mexico-Canada migration when a travel visa was imposed in 2009 and removed in 2016. The imposition coincided with a dramatic decrease in travel and refugee claims. However, the number of Mexican immigrants grew, contrasting expectations of migration policy effectiveness research. The authors suggest that future research should disaggregate effects of policy changes, consider a state’s broader approach to migration policy, and examine how subnational programs and number of legal migration pathways influence trends of mixed migration flows. Access the paper here.

Journal Article: ‘Speaking the Language of the ‘Other’: Negotiating Cultural Boundaries through Language in Chitmahals in Indo-Bangladesh Borders’
Borders are not merely assertions of sovereign territorial demarcations, but indicative of cultural boundaries. This article discusses how the India-Bangladesh Land Boundary Agreement (2015) led to reorganisation of territorial boundaries, whereby the inhabitants had the choice of citizenship between India and Bangladesh that reaffirmed their identity. The subjective differentiation between ‘us’ and ‘them’ was negotiated by various cultural elements such as Bangla language; an everyday language symbolizing membership in the constituting communities, kinship and citizenship in the nation. Language was an important attribute that identified them as ‘Bengali’/‘Bangladeshi’ while navigating the trans-territorial national identity. Access the paper here.

Journal Article: ‘Commitments to Forced Migrants in African Peace Agreements, 1990-2018’
This article presents data on peace agreement commitments towards forced migrants on the African continent (excluding MENA) from 1990 to 2018, resulting from the analysis of 177 peace agreements responding to the search queries ‘Africa (excl. MENA)’ and ‘refugees and displaced persons’ on the Peace Agreement Database (PA-X). This article presents preliminary results from four thematic categories: (1) return, reconstruction, rehabilitation, reintegration, and resettlement (5R), (2) provision commitments, (3) rights and law, and (4) land and property. Access the paper here.

Journal Article: ‘Sanctuary in a Trumpist Context: Creating Spaces of Democratic Exception’
This paper first identifies the necessity for sanctuary as a form of protest against the discretionary and often absolute forms of power shaping the current immigration system, particularly as it affects undocumented immigrants. Although the plenary power doctrine has removed legal personhood from immigrants at the federal level since the late 1800s, immigrants’ rightlessness and vulnerability to detention and deportation have grown since Trump was elected. It distinguishes between a sanctuary city and church-based sanctuary, holding that the latter fits more ancient conceptions of sanctuary. Access the paper here.

New Book: ‘Refugee States: Critical Refugee Studies in Canada’
Exploring “refuge” and “refugee” as concepts that shape Canadian nation-building both within and beyond national borders, Refugee States takes an interdisciplinary and critical approach to describing how refugees articulate their relation to and defiance of official discourses. Through close examinations of refugee movements, contexts, and subjectivities, this collection reveals how Canada has relied upon the rejection and inclusion of refugees as a crucial means of statecraft. Access the book here.

New Book: ‘Human Trafficking: Global History and Perspectives’
Human Trafficking: Global History and Perspectives argues that, far from being a recent development, human trafficking is rooted in the history of the human condition and has only been amplified by globalization. Using a multidisciplinary approach that traces the historical roots of human trafficking in global history, the chapters explore case studies from different parts of the world to show that human trafficking is not only a global phenomenon but a localized enigma. The contributors contend that the causes, and thus, the solutions, are rooted in local and regional social, cultural, political, and economic conditions of victims. The case studies include global, regional, and local examples to analyze the complex causes and effects of human trafficking as well as the legal ramifications. Access the book here.

New Book: ‘Perilous Medicine’
Pervasive violence against hospitals, patients, doctors, and other health workers has become a horrifically common feature of modern war. These relentless attacks destroy lives and the capacity of health systems to tend to those in need. Inaction to stop this violence undermines long-standing values and laws designed to ensure that sick and wounded people receive care. Access the book here

E-Learning: ‘GENIDA e-Learning on IPDs’
GENIDA e-learning on IDPs is aimed at empowering and equipping advocates, civil society actors, lawyers, researchers, policy analysts and law makers with practical leadership skills tailored towards creating a society that respects protects and supports IDPs. GENIDA envisions an Africa where the rights of IDPs are observed, protected and promoted. We believe that an investment in mentorship, civic education, capacity development in form of training will secure the respect, protection promotion and observance of the rights of IDPs today and in the future. Access the course here.

E-Learning: ‘Certificate in Global Displacement and Migration Studies’
Georgetown University’s Institute for the Study of International Migration is offering a new Certificate in Global Displacement and Migration Studies, designed for mid-career professionals. The Certificate will be offered in a one-week intensive course format from 7-11 February with a required capstone project due a few weeks later. The online course will include both synchronous and asynchronous sessions and is intended to provide a solid academic overview of migration and displacement. Tuition is USD 5995. More information is available here

E-Learning: ‘Forced Migration – The Humanitarian Challenge of the Decade Online Training Course
The Institute of International Humanitarian Affairs offers online humanitarian training courses for humanitarian students and practitioners around the world, designed to prepare current and future aid workers with the knowledge and skills needed to respond effectively to humanitarian crises and disasters. More information is available here.

Documentary Film: ‘Children of the Enemy’
What does it feel like to move through a world designed to limit and exclude you? What are the joys and pains of holidays for people of colour, when guidebooks are never written with them in mind? How are black lives today impacted by the othering legacy of colonial cultures and policies? What can travel tell us about our sense of self, of home, of belonging and identity? Why has the world order become hostile to human mobility, as old as humanity itself, when more people are on the move than ever? Access the film here.

Documentary Film: ‘The New Barbarism’
Healthcare and humanitarian workers are increasingly in the crosshairs as hospitals and aid centers have become part of the battlefield in today’s wars. So far, there has been little to stop the profound surge of violence seen across several open-ended conflicts which has claimed thousands of lives, destroyed health systems, triggered mass displacement and state collapse, and exposed the crisis facing the norms of international humanitarian law contained in the Geneva Conventions. Access the film here.

Documentary Film: ‘For Sama’
An intimate yet epic journey into one young mother’s experience of the Syrian conflict. In a time of conflict and darkness in her home in Aleppo, Syria, one young woman kept her camera rolling — while falling in love, getting married, having a baby and saying goodbye as her city crumbled. The award-winning documentary unfolds as a love letter from filmmaker and young mother Waad al-Kateab to her daughter — Sama. Access the film here.

Documentary Film: ‘The Cave’
From Oscar-nominated filmmaker Feras Fayyad, The Cave tells the story of a hidden underground hospital in Syria and the unprecedented female-led team who risk their lives to provide medical care to the besieged local population. Access the film here.

Research Guide: ‘Trucking and Human Trafficking’
Human trafficking, or the illegal movement of people, often for sex or labor, is a $32 billion industry that often goes undetected. Unfortunately, truck stops remain a frequent location of trafficking crimes. While truck stops are not naturally hives of crime, they are, unfortunately, convenient and central locations for traffickers to move throughout the United States. Access the guide here

JOB POSTS

ICVA Deputy Regional Representative Asia Pacifica

ICVA is seeking a Deputy Asia Regional Representative to support the execution of the ICVA strategy in the Asia Pacific region. More information available here. Deadline: 2 January 2022.

ICVA Deputy Regional Representative Asia Pacifica

The West and Central Africa (WCA) Representative will complement and support the regional representative in setting the direction and focus of ICVAs work in the WCA region in the framework of the 2019-2021 Strategy. More information available here. Deadline: 2 January 2022.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

International Migration and Refugee Law Moot Court Competition

It is with great pleasure that the Migration Law Research Group from Ghent University is inviting you to the 2022 International Migration and Refugee Law Moot Court Competition. This international competition aims to bring together students interested in international migration and asylum law from around the globe. The moot court competition consists of a written round in October and November 2021 and a two-day oral round on 17 and 18 March 2022 in Ghent, Belgium. More information is available here.

Thriplow Charitable Trust Bursary

The Thriplow Charitable Trust has established a bursary for the MA in Refugee Protection and Forced Migration Studies by distance-learning. The Thriplow Charitable Trust bursary will be awarded in March 2022. This £5,000 bursary seeks to support an outstanding student based in the UK, who might not otherwise be able to gain access to the MA in Refugee Protection. More information available here. Deadline: 21 January 2022.

Lives in Dignity Grant Facility

Following a hugely successful launch of the Lives in Dignity Grant Facility on World Refugee Day in June this year, we are excited to announce the second call for proposals, which was launched on Tuesday November 30. The second call focuses on projects in countries that have been impacted by the displacement crises related to Myanmar, Venezuela and the Sudan-South Sudan situation. In alignment with the first call, projects are expected to draw upon and develop new forms of collaboration between humanitarian, development and peace actors, with an emphasis on the engagement of affected populations and local ownership, with a total of €12m to be allocated to projects in this call. More information available here. Deadline: 23 January 2022.

Canada Must Save Syrian Boy from Threat of Jail, Torture

Canada must help Yazan Alali, a 17-year-old Syrian boy who is afraid to turn 18, because that’s when the murderous Assad regime will come to claim him for its blood-stained military. His refusal to be forcibly conscripted into an atrocities-tainted army will mark him for jail, torture or death. With most of his family in Canada, he needs an urgent Temporary Resident Permit to escape a regime condemned by Canada for its “brutal and shocking attacks on its own people.” More information available here.

IN THE NEWS

Daina Beth Solomon, After weeks walking, Mexico migrant caravan splits up on buses headed north (23 December 2021

NPR, Migrants are freezing to death at Belarus-Poland boarder (21 November 2021).

Calcutta Research Groups, Kolkata Declaration on the Need for a Coherent Protection Policy and Justice for Refugees and Migrants of Afghanistan (20 November 2021).

Farouk Chothia, Ethiopia’s Tigray conflict: How the TPLF has outflanked the army (18 November 2021).

Haroon Siddique, New bill quietly gives powers to remove British citizenship without notice (17 November 2021).

Stepfan J Bos, Poland’s forces use water cannon, tear gas against migrants (16 November 2021).

Karolina Tagaris, Aid workers face trial in Greece for spying after refugee rescues (15 November 2021).

The Guardian, Trafficking victims should be granted leave to remain in UK, high court rules (12 October 2021).

Tom Cheshire, Uyghurs tortured and beaten to death in Xinjiang, former Chinese police officer reveals (11 October 2021).

BBC News: A year in Calais: One migrantʼs year-long attempt to cross the Channel (21 September 2021).

SEND US YOUR NEWS AND EVENTS

Displaced Peoples (CRN11) newsletter is published quarterly.  The newsletter is a venue for sharing information regarding displaced peoples, broadly defined. Your contribution to the newsletter is crucial to its sustenance, success and quality. To contribute to the newsletter, please contact Veronica Fynn Bruey and Steven Bender: vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca and benders@seattleu.edu. To subscribe or unsubscribe, visit CRN 11 Displaced Peoples.

OCTOBER-DECEMBER NEWSLETTER: VOLUME 3, ISSUE 3, 2021

OCTOBER-DECEMBER NEWSLETTER: VOLUME 3, ISSUE 3, 2021

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WELCOME: LSA 2022

Dear Colleagues:

Welcome to the CRN 11 October-December 2021 Newsletter: Volume 3, Issue 3, the third quarterly issue of 2021. We really hope you and your family are well during this “fourth wave” of the COVID-19 pandemic even as the developing world struggles with access to vaccines while others refuse to be vaccinated.

First and foremost, we are excited to share the Call For Papers for the Law and Society Annual Meeting in Lisbon, Portugal, 13-16 July 2022. The 7th Global Meeting on Law and Society: Rage, Reckoning, & Remedy will be held both in-person and virtually. CRN 11 is inviting you to submit an individual paper online directly via LSA website by 10 November 2021 (remember to click CRN-11 before submitting) OR send your abstract to us by 27 October 2021 to be considered for a CRN-11 panel or roundtable presentation.

Authors interested in doing a New Book in the Field session, please provide us with your name, email address, institutional affiliation, book title, and publication date by 27 October 2021. Additionally, in the LSA Annual Meeting, there is a Call for application for the Graduate Students and Early Career Workshop. LSA will provide flat amounts of USD $750 for participants who travel to the workshop in Lisbon. Submit your application by 17 November 2021.

CRN 11 is committed to advocating for the rights and protection of displaced peoples through this medium. We are seeking a newsletter editor who will commit to producing the quarterly newsletters for 2022. Consider applying and joining us today! Also, we are in the process of finalising a book series contract with Rowman and Littlefield entitled: Migration, Displacement, and Development. Kindly email us for more detail if you are interested in turning your research into a full book.

In closing, we affirm our support for survivors, families, loved ones, and friends of the recent regime change in Afghanistan which has resulted in the forced displacement of many, especially women and children. Last but not the least, join us in congratulating Veronica for being elected president of IASFM 2021-2022 and awarded the ANU International Alumna 2021.

Veronica Fynn Bruey and Steven Bender

DISPLACED PEOPLES’ RIGHTS AND PROTECTION

On 6 October 2021, the UN Human Rights Office (OHCHR) Special Rapporteur on the human rights of migrants, Mr. Felipe González Morales; Special Rapporteur on torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment, Mr. Nils Melzer; and Special Rapporteur on the right to physical and mental health, Ms Tlaleng Mofokeng said Belarus and Poland must work together to keep more migrants from dying on their border as victims of a political dispute. “It is absolutely tragic that six people have already died; not one more person must be allowed to die as a result of this political dispute,” they said. “Belarus reportedly has encouraged refugees and other migrants from as far away as Iraq and Afghanistan to cross its borders into the European Union, while Poland and other EU countries have declared ‘states of emergency’ in an attempt to deny asylum-seekers access to protection in their countries, but now they must work together to save the lives of all those stranded at their common border.” More information is available here.

On 30 September 2021, the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR), the International Organization for Migration (IOM), the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the UN Human Rights Office (OHCHR) called on states to refrain from expelling Haitians without proper assessment of their individual protection needs, to uphold the fundamental human rights of Haitians on the move, and to offer protection mechanisms or other legal stay arrangements for more effective access to regular migration pathways. More information is available here.

On 29 September, a Yemeni humanitarian organization that has provided a lifeline to tens of thousands of people displaced by the country’s conflict is the winner of the 2021 UNHCR Nansen Refugee Award. The Jeel Albena Association for Humanitarian Development, founded in 2017, won the prestigious award for its unwavering support for displaced Yemenis, even as shifting frontlines brought gun battles and explosions to its doorstep. Its founder Ameen Jubran, 37, has himself been displaced by fighting and nearly killed. More information is available here.

On 25 August 2021, the World Food Programme (WFP) reported that one-in-three Afghans, or 14 million people, are hungry today and two million malnourished children urgently need treatment. Meanwhile, since the beginning of the year, conflict and insecurity have driven more than 550,000 Afghans from their homes as some 70,000 displaced people have converged from across the country into the capital, Kabul. Regional Director, John Aylieff pointed out that 14 million people in Afghanistan are struggling to put food on the table. More information is available here.

On 21 June 2021, Bill C-15 (UNDRIP Act) received Royal Assent and was enacted into law. TThe UNDRIP Act is Canada’s first substantive step which provides that the Government of Canada must take all measures necessary to ensure that the laws of Canada are consistent with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and must prepare and implement an action plan to achieve the objectives of the Declaration. More information is available here.

CALLS: CRN-11 EVENTS

Call For Papers: Law and Society 2022 Lisbon, Portugal 

CRN 11 invites you to submit a paper to be considered for a panel, salon, or round-table presentation for the Law and Society Annual Meeting in Lisbon, Portugal, 13-16 July 2022. The 7th Global Meeting on Law and Society: Rage, Reckoning, & Remedy will be held both in-person and virtually. CRN 11 is inviting you to submit an individual paper directly online via LSA website by 10 November 2021 (remember to click CRN-11 before submitting) OR send your abstract to vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca and benders@seattleu.edu by 27 October 2021 to be considered for a CRN-11 panel or roundtable presentation. All abstracts must align with the Law and Society Association abstract guidelines.

New Book in the Field Session
Introduced for the 2016 Annual Meeting, the CRN New Books in the Field Session is an opportunity for CRNs to introduce several new books in one session. Book titles and authors will be listed in the program, as well as the chair/facilitator of the session. Authors interested in doing a New Book in the Field session, email vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca and benders@seattleu.edu with your name, email address, institutional affiliation, book title, and publication date by 27 October 2021.

Graduate Students and Early Career Workshop
“Finding Your Footing, Building Your Standing, & Challenging What’s Expected” LSA is accepting applications for the Graduate Student & Early Career Workshop, in summer 2022. The two-part workshop will convene first in late June, and then on July 12 immediately preceding the Global Meeting on Law & Society in Lisbon, Portugal. Students currently enrolled in graduate/doctoral programs in the social sciences, humanities, and law, as well as early career scholars who received their highest degree after 1 May 2019, including post-doctoral fellows, adjunct faculty, and pre-tenure faculty are welcome to submit their application for the Graduate Students and Early Career Workshop. LSA will provide flat amounts of USD $750 for participants who travel to the workshop in Lisbon. Submit your application by 17 November 2021.

Expression of Interest: Migration, Displacement and Development Book Series

Veronica Fynn Bruey and Steven Bender are in the process of finalising a book series contract with Rowman and Littlefield entitled: Migration, Displacement, and Development. The interdisciplinary series critically examines the obstinacy to expand legal protection to displaced peoples beyond the bona fide refugee within local, regional, and international contexts. Extending protection to a wide range of displaced persons, the series promises to reverse adverse effects on those forced to leave their homes in the name of globalisation by improving the economic, social, and political conditions driving migration in favour of sustaining growth. The series strives for law and policy reform particularly in areas of trade, economy, remittance and aid as well as protecting individual rights to stay home and live a dignified life. If you are interested in turning your research into a full book, email vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca and benders@seattleu.edu.

Call for CRN-11 Newsletter Editor

CRN-11 Newsletter is produced quarterly per annum and must be released on the last day of March, June, September, and December. The Newsletter Editor will be responsible for:

  • Researching and compiling information for the Newsletter,
  • Assisting with the distribution of the Newsletter electronically to subscribers and other social networks,
  • Inviting and showcasing guest blogger written pieces, and
  • Promoting and advertising the Newsletter with the aim of expanding its reach.

To apply, submit a cover letter and CV to vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca  and benders@seattleu.eduApplication Deadline: 30 November 2021

Call For Volunteers: LSA 2022 in Lisbon, Portugal

CRN-11 is in need of volunteers as chairs,  discussants, and notetaker for LSA 2022 conference in Lisbon, Portugal. All interested please email vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca  and benders@seattleu.eduDeadline: 27 October 2021.

Call For Volunteers: Advertisement and Promotion Committee

CRN-11 is also recruiting volunteers to lead the Advertisement and Promotion Committee. To apply, submit a cover letter and CV to vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca  and benders@seattleu.edu. Deadline: 30 November 2021.

Become a CRN-11 Research Collaborator

Interested in being a bona fide research collaborator with CRN-11? To apply, submit a cover letter and CV to vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca  and benders@seattleu.edu. Deadline: Open

Invitation to be a Guest Blogger for CRN-11

Do you have an interesting story to tell about internal and international migration and displacement? CRN 11 is eager to share your piece as a guest blogger in our quarterly newsletter.  Submit your stories to vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca and benders@seattleu.edu. Deadline: Open

Deadly Voyages Book Talk

Veronica Fynn Bruey, Steven Bender, Angel Escamilla Garcia, Niklas Hultin, MichaelAddaney, Tarini Mehta, “Deadly Voyages: Migrant Journeys Across the Globe”, Free Virtual Book Launch hosted by the Refugee Hub, University of Ottawa, Virtual, 25 June 2021, available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tawRlZUSpHc

Veronica Fynn Bruey, “Deadly Voyages: Migrant Journeys Across the Globe”, Free Virtual Book Launch hosted by the World University Service of Canada, World Refugee Day Event, Virtual, 7 June 2021, available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x-ZvS1Uemmg.

Veronica Fynn Bruey, Steven Bender, Chien-yu Liu, “Deadly Voyages: Migrant JourneysAcross the Globe”, Free Virtual Book Launch hosted by the Institute of Social Studies, Erasmus University, Virtual, 12 May 2021, available at: https://eur.cloud.panopto.eu/Panopto/Pages/Viewer.aspx?id=1050ccb8-37b1-46dd-9f0f-ad26011fc2b6.

Veronica Fynn Bruey, Michael Addaney, Maja Grundler, Tarini Mehta, and Franzisca Zanker,“Deadly Voyages: Migrant Journeys Across the Globe”, Free Virtual Book Launch hosted by University of London, Virtual, 21 April 2021, available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZKz434SSIvo

GENERAL CALLS: UPCOMING CONFERENCES

Geographies of Migration in Conflict Settings

What about conflict drives some people to move, while others stay behind? Proposed session for the Annual Meeting of American Geographers 2022, on the geographies of migration during conflict and the dynamics of migration-decision making in conflict settings. The proposed paper session will be submitted for the Annual Meeting of American Geographers 2022   – AAG – to be held in New York, 25 Feb – 1 March. More information is availablehere. Deadline: 10 October 2021

Regional Refugee Settlement Forum, 2021

The Regional Refugee Settlement Forum: Learning from the Past in Australia, Preparing for the Future invites registrations to participate in a forum and roundtable on 12 and 15 October 2021, respectively.  More information is available here.

Whose Move? Addressing Migration and Displacement in the Face of Climate Change, 2021

At this crucial time in global policymaking, the Kaldor Centre Virtual Conference 2021 brings together world experts to share evidence, experience and solutions for people at risk of displacement in the context of climate change and disasters. Whose move? Addressing migration and displacement in the face of climate change will be held in Sydney on 19-21 October 2021. More information is available here.

International Conference on Critical Migration Scholarship

The Masters in Migration Studies Program (MIMS), in conjunction with Jesuit universities, the Jesuit Migration Network, and Global community partners, will host an international virtual conference on Critical Migration Scholarship on November 1 and 2, 2021 at the University of San Francisco, California. More information is available here.

Colloquium on Refugee Sponsorship: Insights and Issues in Comparative Perspective

Colloquium on Refugee Sponsorship: Insights and Issues in Comparative Perspective Innovations in Sponsorship Research Workshop – Nov 2021. The University of Ottawa Refugee Hub and our project partners invite paper or project presentations on research-in- progress and recently published research (~past 12 months) related to refugee sponsorship. The workshop, to be held in November 2021 (date TBC) will feature a series of brief “snapshot” presentations that highlight very recent (and upcoming) developments in the field. For more information, email: eliza.bateman@refugeehub.ca.

Migrant Domestic Workers in Middle East and North Africa, Amman, Jordan, 2022

The ‘Migrant domestic workers in the Middle East and North Africa’ conference is funded by the British Academy and Centre for British Research in the Levant and will be held on 15th February 2022 in Amman, Jordan. The conference will offer a space for critical reflection and exploration on MDW experiences in the region, as well as exploration for how academic work can inform activism and policy change. We invite migrant domestic workers, NGO representatives, academics, practitioners, policymakers, journalists and other stakeholders who engage with these issues to contribute their reflections. More information is available hereDeadline: 10 December 2021.

New Series on Health and Internal Displacement

Although the health of IDPs appears significantly worse than refugees and host communities, research is limited on the health needs of IDPs. This new series by the Journal of Migration and Health on health and internal displacement seeks to increase engagement on the health needs of IDPs and support research, policy and programming responses.  The series focuses specifically on IDP health but is not prescriptive in terms of health conditions, age groups, geographic region, or camp or urban setting, and we hope the series reflects the diversity of IDP populations, contexts and needs. Deadline: 15 December 2021

IASFM ’19, San Paolo, Brazil, 2022

The 19th International Association for the Study of Forced Migration Conference (IASFM19), with the theme, “Global Issues, Regional Approaches – Contexts, Challenges, Dialogues and Solutions”, will be held from August 1-5 August 2022 and hosted online by Universidade Católica de Santos (UniSantos). More information is available here. Deadline: 31 January 2022

Changing Migration, Migration in Change, Berlin, 2022

The 25th International Metropolis Conference Berlin, Changing Migration, Migration in Change, will be held at the Berlin Congress Center in Germany on 4-9 September 2022. Migration is changing. Complex interconnections between technology and digitisation, climate and demographic change, and political unrest are creating a constant state of flux for patterns of, and issues concerning, international migration. The COVID-19 pandemic is an additional challenge. The Conference will consider these challenges. More information is available here. 

RESEARCH, AWARDS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND FELLOWSHIPS

Maria Sibylla Merian Institute for Advance Studies: Individual Fellowships

The Maria Sibylla Merian Institute for Advanced Studies in Africa (MIASA) is dedicated to research in the Humanities and Social Sciences, with ‘Sustainable Governance’ as its central topic. Our main thematic corridors are conflict and sustainable peace, democracy and environmental transformation. We are also interested in a wide range of intersectional sub-topics, such as landownership and acquisition, migration and mobility, restitution of cultural objects, African cities, human rights and other related themes. MIASA is committed to reduce global asymmetries in knowledge production, to promote female scholarship and to bridge cultural divides. The institute offers time and space for supporting innovative academic projects of top international quality. MIASA is offering up to 10 Individual Residential Fellowships for 3-12 months each at the University of Ghana for the academic year 2022/2023. More information is provided here. Deadline: 15 November 2021

Maria Sibylla Merian Institute for Advance Studies: Tandem Residential Fellowships

The Maria Sibylla Merian Institute for Advanced Studies in Africa (MIASA) is dedicated to research in the Humanities and Social Sciences, with ‘Sustainable Governance’ as its central topic. Our main thematic corridors are conflict and sustainable peace, democracy and environmental transformation. We are also interested in a wide range of intersectional sub-topics, such as landownership and acquisition, migration and mobility, restitution of cultural objects, African cities, human rights and other related themes. MIASA is committed to reduce global asymmetries in knowledge production, to promote female scholarship and to bridge cultural divides. The institute offers time and space for supporting innovative academic projects of top international quality. MIASA is offering up to 2 Tandem Residential Fellowships for 3-5 months each at the University of Ghana for the academic year 2022/2023. More information is provided here. Deadline: 15 November 2021

PUBLICATIONS

New Report: ‘2021 Trafficking in Persons Report’
This year’s Trafficking in Persons Report sends a strong message to the world that global crises, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, climate change, and enduring discriminatory policies and practices, have a disproportionate effect on individuals already oppressed by other injustices. Access the full report here.

New Report: ‘Profiles in Resilience: Why Survivors of Domestic Violence and Gang Violence Qualify for International Protection’
Although protection for refugees is a longstanding U.S. legal commitment under federal and international law, immigration policy has become a deeply politicized topic in the United States in recent years. Domestic violence and violence by organized gangs represent a major cause of forced displacement for those arriving at the U.S. border. Yet these forms of persecution are viewed skeptically by some policymakers who favor restricting immigration in spite of U.S. legal obligations to ensure the right to seek asylum. Access the full report here.

New Report: ‘Migrant Workers Abuse in Qatar’s World Cup Luxury Hotel
As kick-off to the FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022 draws closer many national football teams have taken recent stands against racial injustice to highlight the plight of migrant workers in Qatar. As far back as 2019, Liverpool Football Club refused FIFA’s offer to stay in the Masa Malaz Kempinski during the Club World Cup after a Guardian investigation alleged forced labour among subcontracted workers. Access the full report here.

New Report: ‘Migrant Workers’ Rights in Oil Palm Estates in Malaysia’
This report summarizes the findings of an investigation into Malaysian palm oil company IOI Group’s working conditions and a dialogue process with the company. Translated from Finnish report. In the event of interpretation disputes the Finnish text applies. Access the full report here.

New Report: ‘Back to School? Refugee children in Greece denied right to education’
Refugee children in Greece also face dire prospects of receiving a quality education. Even before Covid-19, less than a third of refugee and migrant children were actually enrolled and attending school. The education crisis on the Greek islands is particularly acute. Less than 15% of children in refugee camps attended formal school in the previous year. In the notorious Reception and Identification Centres (RICs), the attendance rate drops to 0.3%, with only seven children out of 2,900 attending class. In this publication, Save the Children and the Greek Council for Refugees call on the Greek Government and European Union to fulfil their clear obligation to enroll and facilitate school attendance of all children living in Greece, regardless of their legal status. Access the full report here.

New Report: ‘Educating Newcomers: K-12 Public Schooling for Undocumented and Asylum-Seeking Children in the United States’
The report specifically aims to help various stakeholders understand the broad range of issues and implications related to population increases in undocumented and asylum-seeking children over the southwest border, including the affordances and challenges of current federal and state immigration policies, numbers of school staff necessary to serve these students, and critical strategies and remaining challenges for supporting these children in U.S. school systems. Access the full report here.

New Report: ‘The Road from Refugee to Resident: How working with displaced people can help create more inclusive and sustainable cities’
About ten years ago, Firas had much to look forward to. A newly qualified lawyer, he and his wife were living among friends and family in the ancient city of Daraa, in southwest Syria. He had ambitions to protect the innocent and provide a good life for his family. The Syrian civil war changed everything. Access the full report here.

New Report: ‘After the Airlift: Protection for Afghan Refugees and Those Who Remain at Risk in Afghanistan’
The scenes at the Kabul airport in recent weeks have been devastating. The airlifts were a race against time to evacuate U.S. citizens, citizens of allied countries, Afghans associated with the United States and allied presence in Afghanistan, and a limited number of Afghan men and women most at-risk under a Taliban rule. The United States and its partners did manage to rescue tens of thousands of people—an essential achievement. However, the airlift must be just the beginning of a sustained effort to ensure protection for Afghans still at-risk, whether seeking safety outside their country’s borders or in need of support within. Access the full report here.

Discussion Paper: ‘International Evacuations of Refugees and Impact on Protection Spaces: Case Study of UNHCR Evacuation Program in Libya’
This essay researches the UNHCR evacuation programme from Libya. The programme has successfully evacuated circa 4,500 persons to safety, yet there are concerns regarding its scalability and impact on protection spaces. Access the paper here.

Discussion Paper: ‘Countering the Politics of Fear – Reframing Threat Narratives about Refugees in Hungary’
The research draws on literature about right-wing populism, the securitisation of migration – including the ‘war on terrorism’ – the impact of securitisation policies and right-wing populist rhetoric on stoking fears among the public, as well as the concepts and assumptions underlying human rights advocacy in challenging the status quo. Access the paper here.

Discussion Paper: ‘Integration to Belonging? Exploring the Trajectory of Integration for Short-term Settled Refugee Women in Berlin’
This paper therefore, has three main aims: first, to provide a case study that prioritises the perspectives of refugee women living in Berlin as experts re their own experiences; second, to fill a research gap in refugee and migrant integration studies through focusing on the first five years of protracted displacement; third, to reassess the trajectory of integration in light of semi-structured interviews with nine refugee women, aged between 19 and 35. Crucially, the paper emphasises the agency of the interviewees in shaping their unique integration process and outcome. Access the paper here.

Journal Article: ‘Migrants and Their Access to the Labour Market in Tanzania: A Feminist Perspective’
The globe is witnessing an increasing feminization of migratory movements, with one estimate putting the share of women higher than it was before. According to International Organization for Migration, by the end of 2019, female migrant workers constituted 40% of all migrant workers in Tanzania. These female migrants are prone to facing a number of challenges in their quest to find work. Access the paper here.

Journal Article: ‘Forced labour and Access to Education of Rohingya Refugee Children in Bangladesh: Beyond a Humanitarian Crisis’
Rohingya refugee children in Bangladesh are forced into labour both inside and outside the camps for a wide range of reasons. This article examines this situation in relation to the access to education for those children living in the camps in Cox’s Bazar. Being informed by several perspectives concerning child labour and access to schooling in developing country contexts, this research work has adopted a qualitative approach to study various factors working behind this pressing issue. Access the paper here.

Journal Article: ‘Hope Springs Eternal: Exploring the Early Settlement Experiences of Highly Educated Eritrean Refugees in the UK’
Millions of people around the world have been forced to flee their homes for socio-economic and political reasons. This paper explores the early settlement experiences of highly educated Eritrean refugees in the UK. It is a phenomenological study informed by narrative interviews with 24 Eritrean refugees who gained a university degree in Eritrea, before migrating to the UK. The participants of this study are what Bauman (1996) calls ‘vagabonds’ who mainly left their country due to the lengthy national service, human rights abuses and/or the political situation of the country. They chose the UK, as their final destination, for its democratic principles and English language. Access the paper here.

Journal Article: ‘The Effects of Inhumane Treatment in North Korean Detention Facilities on the Posttraumatic-Stress Disorder Symptoms of North Korean Refugees’
The study investigated the effects of severe human rights abuses in North Korean on Posttraumatic-stress disorder (PTSD) in North Korean Refugees (NKRs). The study included 300 NKRs (245 females and 55 males) who completed self-report questionnaires that assessed PTSD, experiences of imprisonment, and exposure to inhumane treatment, by authorities in North Korea. Access the paper here.

Journal Article: ‘Between liberal legislation and preventive political practice: Ecuador’s political reactions to Venezuelan forced migration’
The political handling of Venezuelan forced migration in Ecuador has evolved since 2017. This article distinguishes three stages in this evolution. First, from 2017 to mid-2018, Ecuadorian authorities treated Venezuelan entries as those of other South American citizens. Second, from mid-2018 to mid-2019, the Venezuelan exodus was managed as a humanitarian crisis. In the third phase, since mid-2019, authorities imposed restrictive measures, including a mandatory entry visa. Access the paper here.

Journal Article: ‘The Gender-Based Violence and Precarity Nexus: Asylum-Seeking Women in the Eastern Mediterranean’
This paper derives from a larger research on gender-based violence and precarity in the forced migration journeys of asylum-seeking women transiting through the Eastern Mediterranean route and arriving in Greece, in the tumultuous, second decade of the 21st century. In this paper we present the findings from the first phase of the research. Access the paper here.

Journal Article: ‘Conflict, Displacement … and Peace? A Critical Review of Research Debates’
The nexus of violent conflict and forced migration has received continuous scholarly attention since the 1980s, but what are the focus areas and key strands in these research debates? Based on a semi-systematic review of research published between 1980 and 2020, this article examines debates about conflict, displacement, and peace. The review leads to the identification of three main strands that are closely connected: the structural links outlining how conflicts contribute to displacements; the various prevailing risks of violence; and the individual and collective strategies of displaced people to cope with dangers and experiences especially in host countries and regions. Access the paper here.

 New Book: ‘Children of the Camp: The Lives of Somali Youth Raised in Kakuma Refugee Camp, Kenya’
Chronic violence has characterized Somalia for over two decades, forcing nearly two million people to flee. A significant number have settled in camps in neighboring countries, where children were born and raised. Based on in-depth fieldwork, this book explores the experience of Somalis who grew up in Kakuma refugee camp, in Kenya, and are now young adults. This original study carefully considers how young people perceive their living environment and how growing up in exile structures their view of the past and their country of origin, and the future and its possibilities. Access the book here.

New Book: ‘At the Margins of Globalization: Indigenous Peoples and International Economic Law’
Despite the tremendous progress in the development of scientific knowledge, the understanding of the causes of poverty and inequality, and the role of politics and governance in addressing modern challenges, issues such as social inclusion, poverty, marginalization and despair continue to be a reality across the world – and most often impact Indigenous Peoples. At the Margins of Globalization explores how Indigenous Peoples are affected by globalization, and the culture of individual choice without responsibility that it promotes, while addressing what can be done about it. Though international trade and investment agreements are unlikely to go away, the inclusion of Indigenous rights provisions has made a positive difference. This book explains how these provisions operate and how to build from their limited success. Access the book here.

New Book: ‘Design to Live: Everyday Inventions from a Refugee Camp’
The power of art and design to create a life worth living: designs, inventions, and artworks from the Azraq Refugee Camp in Jordan. Access the book here.

New Book: ‘Global Views on Climate Relocation and Social Justice: Navigating Retreat’
This edited volume advances our understanding of climate relocation (or planned retreat), an emerging topic in the fields of climate adaptation and hazard risk, and provides a platform for alternative voices and views on the subject. Access the book here.

New Book: ‘The NGO Moment: The Globalisation of Compassion from Biafra to Live Aid’
This book is a study of compassion as a global project from Biafra to Live Aid. Kevin O’Sullivan explains how and why NGOs became the primary conduits of popular concern for the global poor between the late 1960s and the mid-1980s and shows how this shaped the West’s relationship with the post-colonial world. Access the book here.

New Book: ‘Outsiders: Memories of Migration to and from North Korea’
In this unique and insightful book, Markus Bell explores the hidden histories of the men, women, and children who traveled from Japan to the world’s most secretive state—North Korea. Through vivid ethnographic details and interviews with North Korean escapees, Outsiders: Memories of Migration to and from North Korea reveals the driving forces that propelled thousands of ordinary people to risk it all in Kim Il-Sung’s “Worker’s Paradise”, only to escape back to Japan half a century later. Access the book here.

New Book: ‘Planetary Specters Race, Migration, and Climate Change in the Twenty-First Century’
Neel Ahuja tracks the figure of the climate refugee in public media and policy over the past decade, arguing that journalists, security experts, politicians, and nongovernmental organizations have often oversimplified climate change and obfuscated the processes that drive mass migration. To understand the systemic reasons for displacement, Ahuja argues, it is necessary to reframe climate disaster as interlinked with the history of capitalism and the global politics of race, wherein racist presumptions about agrarian underdevelopment and Indigenous knowledge mask how financial, development, migration, and climate adaptation policies reproduce growing inequalities. Access the book here.

New Book: ‘Revisiting the Nomadic Subject: Women’s Experiences of Travelling Under Conditions of Forced Displacement’
This book follows the stories of forcefully displaced women and raises the question of whether we can still use the figuration of the nomadic subject in feminist theories and politics. This question is examined in the light of the ongoing global crises of mobility and severe border practices. In recounting their stories migrant and refugee women appear in the world as ‘who they are’ — unique and unrepeatable human beings —and not as ‘what they are’ —objectified ‘refugees’, ‘victims’ or ‘stateless subjects’. Access the book here.

New Book: Sa‘udi Policies towards Migrants and Refugees: A Sacred Duty”
A Sacred Duty sets out the Kingdom’s policy toward the global issue of migrants and refugees, with special emphasis directed toward Muslim societies. Discussion focuses on refugee communities currently living in Sa‘udi Arabia, some of which migrated due to war, forced displacement, environmental catastrophe, and economic hardship. Some migrants have come from bordering countries such as Iraq and Yemen; others reached the Arabian Peninsula from Africa and Asia. All have been welcomed and cared for, though settlement conditions, repatriation and deportation circumstances were not always ideal. Access the book here.

New Book: ‘Uncertain Refuge: Sanctuary in the Literature of Medieval England’
To seek sanctuary from persecution by entering a sacred space is an act of desperation, but also a symbolic endeavor: fugitives invoke divine presence to reach a precarious safe haven that imbues their lives with religious, social, or political significance. In medieval England, sanctuary was upheld under both canon and common law, and up to five hundred people sought sanctuary every year. What they found, however, was not so much a static refuge as a temporary respite from further action—confession and exile—or from further violence—jurisdictional conflict, harrying or starvation, a breaching of the sanctuary. Access the book here.

New Book: ‘Unfree: Migrant Domestic Work in Arab States’
A stirring account of the experiences of migrant domestic workers, and what freedom, abuse, and power mean within a vast contract labor system. Access the book here.

New Book: ‘Latin America and Refugee Protection: Regimes, Logics, and Challenges’
Looking at refugee protection in Latin America, this landmark edited collection assesses what the region has achieved in recent years. It analyses Latin America’s main documents in refugee protection, evaluates the particular aspects of different regimes, and reviews their emergence, development and effect, to develop understanding of refugee protection in the region. Drawing from multidisciplinary texts from both leading academics and practitioners, this comprehensive, innovative and highly topical book adopts an analytical framework to understand and improve Latin America’s protection of refugees. Access the book here.

New Book: ‘Invisibility in African Displacements: From Structural Marginalization to Strategies of Avoidance’
African migrants have become increasingly demonised in public debate and political rhetoric. There is much speculation about the incentives and trajectories of Africans on the move, and often these speculations are implicitly or overtly geared towards discouraging and policing their movements. What is rarely understood or scrutinised however, are the intricate ways in which African migrants are marginalised and excluded from public discourse; not only in Europe but in migrant-receiving contexts across the globe. Invisibility in African Displacements offers a series of case studies that explore these dynamics. Access the book here.

New Book: ‘Travelling While Black: Essays Inspired by a Life on the Move’
What does it feel like to move through a world designed to limit and exclude you? What are the joys and pains of holidays for people of colour, when guidebooks are never written with them in mind? How are black lives today impacted by the othering legacy of colonial cultures and policies? What can travel tell us about our sense of self, of home, of belonging and identity? Why has the world order become hostile to human mobility, as old as humanity itself, when more people are on the move than ever? Access the book here.

JOB POSTS

Indigenous Faculty Appointment: University of British Columbia

The Peter A. Allard School of Law at the University of British Columbia seeks to recruit an outstanding Indigenous senior faculty member and invites applications from Indigenous candidates for a full-time tenure-track or tenured appointment, ideally at the rank of Associate or Full Professor. It is expected that the position will commence July 1, 2022, subject to negotiation with the successful candidate. The successful candidate will be appointed to the rank appropriate to their qualifications and experience. The position is also subject to budgetary approval. More information email: appointments@allard.ubc.ca. Deadline: 27 October 2021

Research Fellow: Osnabruck University

Osnabrück University’s Institute for Migration Research and Intercultural Studies (IMIS) is seeking to appoint a Research Fellow (m/f/d) (salary level E 15 TV-L, 100 %) to head the Junior Research Group “The Production of Knowledge about Migration”, sponsored by the Volkswagen Foundation funding initiative “Niedersächsisches Vorab”. The position is to be filled as soon as possible for a period of 3 years. For more information, email imis@uni-osnabrueck.de. Deadline: 31 October 2021

Departmental Lecturer in Forced Migration: University of Oxford

The Oxford Department of International Development seeks to appoint a Departmental Lecturer in Forced Migration. The post is fixed-term for twenty months to cover the research leave of a member of the permanent academic staff. The successful candidate will teach core and optional courses on the MSc in Refugee and Forced Migration Studies and will form part of the core academic teaching staff of the Refugee Studies Centre. More information is available here. Deadline: 11 October 2021

Research Fellow in Law: University of New South Wales

You will be working with an established team on the implementation of the ‘Improving the Regulation of Modern Slavery and Access to Remedy: Learning from Experience’ project within the Australian Human Rights Institute at UNSW. This is an opportunity to conduct independent research, contribute to high quality academic and professional publications and participate in defining the direction of the research. The position is part-time (3 days per week). More information available here. Deadline: 11 October 2021

ANNOUNCEMENTS

International Migration and Refugee Law Moot Court Competition

It is with great pleasure that the Migration Law Research Group from Ghent University is inviting you to the 2022 International Migration and Refugee Law Moot Court Competition. This international competition aims to bring together students interested in international migration and asylum law from around the globe. The moot court competition consists of a written round in October and November 2021 and a two-day oral round on 17 and 18 March 2022 in Ghent, Belgium. More information is available here.

Immigration, Refugee and Citizenship Canada Launches the Canadian Refugee Protection Portal

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) is pleased to announce the launch of the Canadian Refugee Protection Portal (CRPP). Beginning October 6, 2021, persons in Canada wishing to make a claim for refugee protection (with or without the assistance of a representative) can create a secure CRPP account, complete a questionnaire and submit supporting documents, including their completed basis of claim form, online. More information is available here.

Molloy Bursary

The Canadian Immigration Historical Society (CIHS) Board proudly announces the establishment of the CIHS Molloy Bursary for undergraduate students in Canadian universities.  The goal of the Bursary is to provide financial support to students studying Canadian history, especially the history of immigration to this country.  Each year a $1,000 Bursary will be awarded to a deserving student studying in either official language.  We invite newcomers to Canada to apply. More information available here.

Zolberg Institute on Migration and Mobility: Certificate in Migrations Studies

The Zolberg Institute on Migration and Mobility is pleased to announce that the noncredit Certificate in Migration Studies has officially launched. Registration is now open for Forced Migration and Cities, Climate, and Migration. These six-week courses will be delivered via asynchronous video recordings and include a live discussion component. More information is available here.

A New Module on Disasters, Climate Change and Displacement

A New MA Module on Disasters, Climate Change and Displacement will be launched in October 2021 as part of the MA in Refugee Protection and Forced Migration Students at the University of London. The new elective module focuses on human displacement, migration and (im)mobility in the context of disasters, climate change and environmental degradation. More information is available here.

Executive Master in European Law on Migration and Asylum

Organised by the Odysseus Academic Network for Legal Studies on Migration and Asylum in Europe, the aim of the Executive Master in European Law on Migration and Asylum program is to provide its participants with an in-depth understanding of the legal rules on migration and asylum adopted by the European Union and the specialised literature they generate. It will be of interest to all persons who wish to acquire a special knowledge of migration and asylum law, for instance EU or national civil servants, lawyers or judges, workers in NGOs, researchers and PhD students who frequently confront the complex legal dimension of immigration and asylum in their work. More information available here.

The Story of Migration Animation

MIDEQ and PositiveNegatives launched The Story of Migration, an animation in six languages that aims to tell the complex story of the relationship between migration and global inequalities.The animation, illustrated by Karrie Fransman, is based on a script written with MIDEQ’s partners in 11 countries in the Global South and challenges many of the ideas that currently dominate media representations of migration. More information available here.

Ethical Considerations in Research with People in Situations of Forced Migration

The Ethical Considerations in Research with People in Situations of Forced Migration is available here. Your Rights in Research is also available here.

Researching Internal Displacement Launched

Today we launch Researching Internal Displacement as a major new hub for independent analysis. This web platform connects researchers, practitioners, policy- makers, students, artists and people from displacement-affected communities with cutting-edge research, analysis, creative materials and events on internal displacement. We welcome new contributions! More information is available here

IN THE NEWS

Le Devoir: Le combat de Santiago Ávila dans les quartiers chauds du Honduras (2 Octobre 2021)

Joy News: Buduburam Demolition: Residents fail to leave area after deadline to relocate expires (30 September 2021)

Amnesty: Bangladesh: Investigate killing of prominent Rohingya activist Mohib Ullah (29 September 2021)

The Guardian: Indigenous children set to receive billions after judge rejects Trudeau challenges (29 September 2021)

France 24: Six years a slave: Indian farm workers exploited in Italy (11 July 2021)

Cal Matters: Supreme Court decision could mean increase in labor trafficking of farmworkers (9 July 2021)

Freedom United: How Accurate is the 2021 TIP report? (8 July 2021)

CBC: 4 things you should know about Canada’s first Indigenous governor general (6 July 2021)

The Guardian: ‘I want them to feel human again’: the woman who escaped slavery in the UK – and fights to free others (30 June 2021) 

SEND US YOUR NEWS AND EVENTS

Displaced Peoples (CRN11) newsletter is published quarterly.  The newsletter is a venue for sharing information regarding displaced peoples, broadly defined. Your contribution to the newsletter is crucial to its sustenance, success and quality. To contribute to the newsletter, please contact Veronica Fynn Bruey and Steven Bender: vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca and benders@seattleu.edu. To subscribe or unsubscribe, visit CRN 11 Displaced Peoples.

APRIL – JUNE NEWSLETTER: VOLUME 3, ISSUE 2, 2021

APRIL – JUNE NEWSLETTER: VOLUME 3, ISSUE 2, 2021

CRN11_Newsletter_Vol3Iss2_May-Jun 2021_Final

WELCOME

Dear Colleagues:

Welcome to the CRN 11 April-June 2021 Newsletter: Volume 3, Issue 2, the second quarterly issue of 2021, prepared by CRN 11 member and volunteer Dr. Azin Emami. We really hope you and your family are fully vaccinated as the number of cases seems to be declining where vaccines are available, although many countries are still struggling. According to the Director General of the World Health Organisation, Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, “[m]ore than 75% of all vaccines have been administered in just 10 countries”.

Sadly, Liberia, still recovering from 14-years of civil war, is not one of the ten countries where the COVID-19 cases are declining. Having survived the Ebola Virus Disease, Liberia is faced with yet another challenge as the COVID-19 cases rise quickly. According to the Chief Medical Officer Dr. Francis Ketteh, the active confirmed cases in the country include 226 healthcare workers.

As you may know, there is an added vulnerability to being infected by the COVID-19 for displaced peoples including homeless peoples, Indigenous peoples, refugees, and internally displaced peoples (to name a few), hence the need to prioritise access to vaccines. Three of such populations include the children in the Tigray conflict in Ethiopia; Fulani settlers in Nigeria’s pastoralist-Farmers conflict; and students caught up in ongoing attacks by several Boko Haram’s factions in northeastern Nigeria.

In closing, we would like to express our support for survivors, families, loved ones, and friends of Aboriginal people (mostly children) buried in unmarked graves across Canada. Canada’s Residential School system forcibly displaced over 150,000 children in 150 institutions between 1870 and 1996.

In spite of the continuous challenge globally, CRN 11 is committed to advocating for the rights and protection of displaced peoples through this medium. Consider joining us today!

Veronica Fynn Bruey and Steven Bender

DISPLACED PEOPLES’ RIGHTS AND PROTECTION

The ongoing repression of protests in Myanmar could spark a “full-blown conflict” on a par with Syria, the United Nations’ top human rights official warned on 13 April, urging States with influence to take immediate and impactful action to halt the “slaughter” of civilians. More information is available here.

On 28th May, UN humanitarians expressed deep concern on Friday about serious and ongoing abuses carried out against displaced civilians who are also facing dire food insecurity in Ethiopia’s Tigray region, after months of conflict. More information is available here.

On 18 June 2021, UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, is today urging world leaders to step up their efforts to foster peace, stability and cooperation in order to halt and begin reversing nearly a decade-long trend of surging displacement driven by violence and persecution. More information is available here.

On 20 June, to mark World Refugee Day, General António Guterres announced that everyone has a duty to help refugees rebuild their lives after a particularly difficult year for so many. More information is available here.

GENERAL CALLS: CRN 11 EVENTS

Call For Members: Research and Development Committee

CRN 11 is currently recruiting members to join Magdalena Krystyna Butrymowicz who leads the Research and Development Committee. Those interested, please email Magdalena: magdalena.butrymowicz@upjp2.edu.pl. Deadline: Open

Call For Volunteers: Advertisement and Promotion Committee

CRN 11 is currently recruiting volunteers to lead the Advertisement and Promotion Committee. Those interested, please send a cover letter and CV to veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org.

Deadline: Open

Call For Volunteers: Newsletter Editor

Interested in making the best use of your time during COVID-19 lockdown? Apply for the CRN11 newsletter editor position.  Submit a cover letter and CV to veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org  and benders@seattleu.edu. Deadline: Open

Become a CRN 11 Research Collaborator

Interested in being a bona fide research collaborator with CRN 11? Email veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org for details on how to apply. Deadline: Open

Invitation to be a Guest Blogger for CRN 11

Do you have an interesting story to tell about internal and international migration and displacement? CRN 11 is eager to share your piece as a guest blogger for our quarterly newsletter.  Please submit your stories to veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org and benders@seattleu.edu. Deadline:Open

RESEARCH, AWARDS, AND SCHOLARSHIPS

The Comparative Network on Refugee Externalisation (CONREP). Publication Support Prize for Refugees. Deadline: 2 July 2021.

The Comparative Network on Refugee Externalisation (CONREP). The Best Journal Article or Book Chapter Prize. Deadline: 2 July 2021.

The Urban Citizen Fellowship is established by the Municipality of Amsterdam and NIAS-KNAW to stimulate the use of advanced research in political deliberation and public policymaking for the city of Amsterdam. This unique co-sponsored fellowship offers researchers the opportunity to carry out research projects around the concepts of Inclusivity (2020), Democratization and Representation (2021) and Citizenship and Education (2022). Read More.

As part of its Mobility, Temporality and Africa’s Future Politics project, the African Centre for Migration & Society has just completed data collection on 1500+ domestic and international migrants and long term residents in Accra, Johannesburg, and Nairobi. The data explore the trans-local moral and material economies shaping place and politics in these cities’ rapidly transforming neighborhoods. It has generated some of the first data on how COVID has reshaped lives and livelihoods across African cities. Conducted in collaboration with Samuel Hall (Nairobi) and University of Ghana (Accra), the first phase analysis will also involve Columbia University’s Center for Spatial Research. From mid-2022, the data will be widely available for researchers and students.

Applications are invited for a PhD scholarship at the Copenhagen Centre for Social Data Science (SODAS) at the University of Copenhagen as part of the ERC-funded project “DISTRACT: The Political Economy of Attention in Digitized Denmark.” Employment is scheduled to begin November 2021 or as soon as possible thereafter. Read More.

UPCOMING CONFERENCES/CALL FOR PAPERS

Journal of Refugee Studies (JRS) Call for Proposals

The Journal of Refugee Studies (JRS) is accepting proposals for special issues. JRS is a peer-reviewed journal featuring original, high-quality research related to diverse aspects of forced migration. We welcome proposals that engage with and significantly advance scholarly debates in the field of refugee and forced migration studies. For more information on the Journal and its aims, please see here.

Date: 31 August 2021.

Research Consultancy: Refugee-Led Organizations in Asia Pacific

Recruit up to four research consultants, including researchers with ongoing or former experience of forced displacement, to produce pioneering research that helps to better understand the work and contributions of refugee-led organisations in Asia and the Pacific. This research project is funded by Act for Peace and is supported by several key stakeholders in the region, including the Asia Pacific Network of Refugees, the Asia Pacific Refugee Rights Network, and the Kaldor Centre for International Refugee Law at UNSW Sydney. For more details on the roles, see here.

Date: 31 July 2021.

Law and Society Annual Meeting 2021 Radboud Summer school: The Science Behind Migrant Inclusion Policies: Evidence-Based Policies and Policy-Based Evidence

Many migrants in receiving countries are facing disadvantaged living circumstances when compared to natives. In most Western countries, we observe economic inequality, inequality in access to information, healthcare, and housing. Moreover, there are increasing concerns that migrants and the ‘native’ population live separated lives and rarely meet and mingle. When migrant inclusion is hampered, this limits migrants to reach their own full potential. Moreover, the resulting inequalities and the lack of social cohesion can pose a threat to the wellbeing and prosperity of the receiving country as a whole. It is therefore no surprise that to curb the cons of migration and to capitalize on the pros, migrant policy makers and scientists alike strive for a better inclusion of migrants into host societies.

Date: 12 – 16 July 2021
Mode of study: On campus
Fee: € 550 
Scholarship available!

18th IMISCOE Annual Conference

Crossing Borders, Connecting Cultures  will be held 7-9 July 2021 in Luxembourg.

IASFM 18 (Updated)

The International Association for the Study of Forced Migration (IASFM18) Bi-annual conference:
Disrupting Theory, Unsettling Practice: Towards Transformative Forced Migration Scholarship and Policy, will be held 26-28 July 2021 at the University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana.

JOB POSTS

Postdoctoral Associate in Law at the University of Florida, Levin College of Law  

The UF Law Race and Crime Center for Justice (RCCJ) is excited to announce its inaugural Postdoctoral Associate position.  The Center will focus on pressing national issues involving the impact of race on crime and justice. Policing, courts and corrections form the broad expanse of focal points for the Center’s work. As well, laws, criminal-legal policies, theories, and applications offer frameworks for the Center’s focus. The RCCJ will conduct research and produce scholarship with an eye towards policy application. The Postdoctoral Associate will work in collaboration with the Director, UF race scholars, and students, to establish and carry out a robust scholarly agenda.  This position provides a keen opportunity for a junior scholar to focus on critical race and crime issues and identify interdisciplinary and novel policy responses. More information is available here.

Lecturer in Politics and International Studies

Do you have a clear commitment to creating and delivering an excellent student experience in a research-intensive Russell Group university? Are you interested in teaching and scholarship with opportunities for progression and promotion? Do you have a background in Politics, International Studies or a related discipline?

The School of Politics and International Studies (POLIS) is a leading international department for creative and high-quality teaching. As such we intend to make a number of new lectureship appointments of scholars who are committed to pursuing a career specialising in teaching and scholarship. These posts provide the opportunity to teach in an ambitious school focused on challenge-led research and education. They provide in particular the opportunity to teach in a school which is developing curricula to deliver, in alignment with its strategic vision to study and teach the politics of global challenges, a diverse, inclusive, decolonial and digitally informed student experience.

The lectureships will afford successful candidates the opportunity to conduct ongoing scholarship work in areas that may include innovations in blended learning, construction of student placement opportunities and/or the pursuit of pedagogic projects. We are looking to recruit scholars who wish to develop an extended career focused on teaching and scholarship, supported through opportunities for progression and promotion. Crucially we seek candidates who are flexible, pro-active, and capable of providing both students and fellow staff with strong support. Further information is available here.

PUBLICATIONS

New paper: Sustaining the Private Sponsorship of Resettled Refugees in Canada’

Based on an original qualitative study, this paper probes how voluntary sponsorship has been sustained over decades, despite the high personal and financial costs it entails, by analyzing the insights of those who have experienced sponsorship: former refugees who came through the program, long-term sponsors, key informants, and other community leaders. Access the piece here.

New paper: ‘Migrant Smuggling in Africa: Challenges Yet to Be Overcome’

This paper focuses on the plight of the smuggling of migrants in Africa. Migrant smuggling has been documented along at least five major and several more minor routes in Africa. This study investigates whether current legislation and policies are effective in curbing the practice of smuggling in Africa. To evaluate the success rate of these measures, the author compares figures over recent years to establish whether there has been a decrease in the number of migrants smuggled throughout the various regions of the continent. Access the piece here.

New dynamic webpage: IOM

The International Organization for Migration’s (IOM) flagship publication has launched a dynamic new webpage that connects fact-based narratives on migration with interactive data visualizations on some of the latest global migration data and information. It is the first microsite of its kind since the World Migration Report (WMR) series began more than two decades ago. Read more here.

IN THE NEWS

BBC, Ethiopia’s Tigray Conflict: Street Celebrations as Rebels Seize Capital ( 29 June 2021)

UN News, Hospitals Barely Functioning, Famine Still Looming in Ethiopia’s Tigray Region ( 29 June 2021)

The New York Times, Unmarked Graves at Residential Schools in Canada: What We Know (25 June 2021)

The Guardian, Canada Discovers 751 Unmarked Graves at Former Residential Schools (24 June 2021)

Reuters, Northeast Nigeria Insurgency Has Killed Almost 350,000, UN ( 24 June 2021)

Reuters, Boko Haram Militants Kill 8 in Southeastern Niger, Says Defense Ministry ( 30 June 2021)

The Guardian, Migrants Forced to Wait Four Years for Benefits in Australian Budget’s Biggest Cost-Cutting Measure (11 May 2021))

CBS News, Biden’s First 100 Days: How US Immigration Policy Has and Hasn’t Changed (28 April 2021)

AP, Rights Groups Slam Denmark’s ‘Dangerous’ Decision to Return Syrian Refugees (9 April 2021)

Infomigrants, Mediterranean Sea: Charity Says Migrants Stranded in ‘Critical’ State, (3 April 2021)

Arab News, From Ethiopia to Yemen, a Perilous Migrant Route to Endless Misery (3 April 2021)

The New Humanitarian, What’s Behind the UK’s Harsh Post-Brexit Asylum Overhaul? (11 May 2021)

Reuters, Kenya Orders Closure  of Two Refugee Camps, Gives Ultimatum to UN Agency (24 March 2021)

Infomigrants, Syrian Refugees Tortured by Lebanese Security Forces: Amnesty (24 March 2021)

Scientific American, Biden Pushes U.S. and the World to Help Climate Migrants ( 8 February 2021) 

SEND US YOUR NEWS AND EVENTS

Displaced Peoples (CRN11) newsletter is published quarterly.  The newsletter is a venue for sharing information regarding displaced peoples, broadly defined. Your contribution to the newsletter is crucial to its sustenance, success and quality. To contribute to the newsletter, please contact Veronica Fynn Bruey, Steven Bender and Azin Emami: veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org benders@seattleu.edu, aziemami@gmail.com To subscribe or unsubscribe visit CRN 11 Displaced Peoples.

 

JANUARY – MARCH NEWSLETTER: VOLUME 3, ISSUE 1, 2021

JANUARY – MARCH NEWSLETTER: VOLUME 3, ISSUE 1, 2021

CRN11_Newsletter_Vol3Iss1_Jan-Mar 2021_Final

WELCOME

Dear Colleagues:

Happy New Year and welcome to the CRN 11 Jan-Mar 2021 Newsletter: volume 3 Issue 1, the first quarterly issue of the year 2021. We really hope you and your family are thriving well as the COVID-19 vaccines phases out to include the general population around the world. In these difficult times we want to let you know that you and your loved ones are in our thoughts and prayers.

Although we are making progress with the COVID-19 vaccination, displaced populations are still at risk in diverse ways. On 16 March 2021, the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies reported that 12.5 million people were displaced globally between September 2020 and February 2021, 60 percent of which occurred in the Asia Pacific region mainly due to climate and weather-related disasters.

Recent attacks in DR Congo have left 40,000 displaced, dozens killed, including Italian Ambassador Luca Attanasio, a policeman and their driver. Human Rights Watch reports that approximately 900,000 Rohingya are currently displaced in overcrowding camps in Bangladesh while the 600,000 remaining in Myanmar are being subjected to persecution, violence, and limited access to food, healthcare, education, and livelihoods. In other disturbing news, Rossella Pagliuchi-Lor, the UK Representative for the UNHCR, is “extremely concerned”, after the Home Secretary Priti Patel said that  the UK is considering the processing of asylum seekers abroad.

In spite of the continuous challenge globally, CRN 11 is committed to advocating for the rights and protection of displaced peoples through this medium. Consider joining us today!

Lastly, please join us in thanking Dr Azin Emami, who has taken on the Editor role to produce CRN11 quarterly newsletter.

Veronica Fynn Bruey and Steven Bender

DISPLACED PEOPLES’ RIGHTS AND PROTECTION

On 1 February 2021, UN experts said Sudan must urgently implement strong measures to ensure the safety of civilians, including the internally displaced, and thoroughly investigate and bring to justice the perpetrators of recent deadly intercommunal violence and attacks in Darfur. More information is available  here.

Ahead of a virtual conference on 4 February 2021, UNHCR and IOM are calling on states to strengthen protection and assistance of people displaced in the context of disasters and climate change. More information is available here.

As Portugal assumes the presidency of the European Union (EU), to be followed by Slovenia later this year, the UNHCR on 12 January 2021 called on them to lead the effort to forge a better protection system for those seeking refuge across the continent and beyond. More information is available here.

On 18 February, in an appeal to “put Syrians first…finally”, Paolo Pinheiro, the Commission of Inquiry Chair, led renewed calls for a ceasefire. He also urged the international community to “expend every effort to support a peaceful, negotiated resolution to the conflict and to help place Syria on a path toward a stable, prosperous, and just future for all her people”. More information is available here.

GENERAL CALLS: CRN 11 EVENTS

Call For Members: Research and Development Committee

CRN 11 is currently recruiting members to join Magdalena Krystyna Butrymowicz who leads the Research and Development Committee. Those interested, please email Magdalena: magdalena.butrymowicz@upjp2.edu.pl. Deadline: Open

Call For Volunteers: Advertisement and Promotion Committee

CRN 11 is currently recruiting volunteers to lead the Advertisement and Promotion Committee. Those interested, please send a cover letter and CV to veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org.

Deadline: Open

Call For Volunteers: Newsletter Editor

Interested in making the best use of your time during COVID-19 lockdown? Apply for the CRN11 newsletter editor position.  Submit a cover letter and CV to veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org  and benders@seattleu.edu. Deadline: Open

Become a CRN 11 Research Collaborator

Interested in being a bona fide research collaborator with CRN 11? Email veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org for details on how to apply. Deadline: Open

Invitation to be a Guest Blogger for CRN 11

Do you have an interesting story to tell about internal and international migration and displacement? CRN 11 is eager to share your piece as a guest blogger for our quarterly newsletter.  Please submit your stories to veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org and benders@seattleu.edu. Deadline:Open

RESEARCH, AWARDS, AND SCHOLARSHIPS

University of Birmingham, Global Masters Scholarship.  Deadline: 30 June 2021.

The Allan and Nesta Ferguson Scholarships for African Students to Study in the United KingdomDeadline: 1 April 2021.

Griffith Remarkable Scholarship for exceptional students applying for undergraduate and postgraduate coursework studies at Griffith University. Deadline: Trimester 2, 2021 entry: 16 April 2021, Trimester 3, 2021: 6 August 2021.

Brock University, Tenure Track Assistant or Associate Professor, Indigenous History in CanadaDeadline: 10 April 2021.

Charles University, PhD Program in DemographyDeadline: Please inquire.

University of Ottawa, Postdoctoral FellowshipDeadline: 5 April 2021.

UPCOMING CONFERENCES/EVENTS/CALL FOR PAPERS

Deadly Voyages Virtual Book Launch (Free)

Deadly Voyages: Migrant Journeys across the Globe explores the burdens and impact of perilous migration, while considering which laws, policies, practices, and venues might establish empathy and protection for migrants. This interdisciplinary volume envisions and calls for a transformation in migration policy, motivated by the common goal of drastically reducing the peril migrants face when compelled to make their treacherous journeys. All contributors to this volume agree on the inadequacy of current approaches and the dire need for change in global migration law and policy. Therefore, the book seeks to inform, educate, persuade, and facilitate newer or less-heard perspectives, toward wider participation and influence within the forced migration policy debate. Guided by the famous advice of Karl Marx that the point should be changing the world rather than merely analyzing or interpreting it, the contributors suggest practical measures to fix the current gap in responses to migrant peril, along with strategies for diagnosing, countering, and promoting human dignity and social justice, with the aim of preventing future deaths and injuries in migrant journeys across the globe.

Host: School of Advanced Study, University of London
Date: 21 April 2021, 4:00 PM – 5:30 PM (GMT)
Click here to RSVP. Watch the video presentation here.

Host: Institution of Social Studies, Erasmus University Rotterdam
Date: 12 May 2021, 5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (CEST)
Click here to RSVP.

2021 Law and Society Association Annual Meeting

Virtual event 27th-30th May 2021. Ours is an era of multiple and overlapping crises. Climate, democracy, economy and health are newly unstable throughout the world. Last summer, for the first time, the physical Law and Society conference was canceled in light of a global pandemic. In the United States, the pandemic exacerbated underlying racial inequalities that erupted in protests throughout the country, and beyond. Across the globe, these crises reveal existing social inequalities in different ways, and demand that we adapt to survive. What is the role of law, which strives for stability as well as justice, in this volatile context?
Click here to learn More about the Conference

Refugee Law Initiative Annual Conference

Virtual event 9th-11th June 2021. The Refugee Law Initiative Conference is an annual international forum dedicated to debating the latest research and developments in the field. Run this year as a virtual event over three (3) half-days, the 5th RLI Annual Conference builds on the success of previous RLI conferences in uniting refugee law academics, practitioners, policy-makers and students. This year’s theme is ‘Ageing Gracefully? The 1951 Refugee Convention at 70’, but more general papers are also welcome. Paper/panel proposals are due on 31 March 2021.

Law and Society Annual Meeting 2021 Radboud Summer school: The Science Behind Migrant Inclusion Policies: Evidence-Based Policies and Policy-Based Evidence

Many migrants in receiving countries are facing disadvantaged living circumstances when compared to natives. In most Western countries, we observe economic inequality, inequality in access to information, healthcare and housing. Moreover, there are increasing concerns that migrants and the ‘native’ population live separated lives and rarely meet and mingle. When migrant inclusion is hampered, this limits migrants to reach their own full potential. Moreover, the resulting inequalities and the lack of social cohesion can pose a threat to the wellbeing and prosperity of the receiving country as a whole. It is therefore no surprise that to curb the cons of migration and to capitalize on the pros, migrant policy makers and scientists alike strive for a better inclusion of migrants into host societies.
Date: 12 – 16 July 2021
Mode of study: On campus
Fee: € 550 Scholarship available!

Somali Studies in Canada Colloquium: Somalinimo, Blackness and Belonging in the West

Carleton University is pleased to announce its third biennial Somali Studies in Canada Colloquium, taking place on October 16 & 17, 2021. Somali diaspora communities live in sizeable numbers in Canada and most other Western countries. This year’s theme comes in the wake of the Black Lives Matter global protests of summer 2020 which were sparked by the murder of George Floyd in South Minneapolis, a neighbourhood with a large Somali-American community. Somali diaspora communities in Minneapolis, other parts of the U.S., Canada, Europe and elsewhere participated in these popular demands for racial justice not only for African-Americans but also for Somalis and other Black communities. Crucially, the cases of Abdirahman Abdi in Canada and Shukri Abdi in the U.K. were also part of protestors’ calls for transparency, accountability and justice for the victims, their families and the community-at-large. For abstract submission or if you have any question, please contact: Dr. Nimo Bokore, nimo.bokore@carleton.ca
Abstract Deadline: 15 May 2021 

Border Abolition 2021 Conference

Border Abolition 2021 will be a two-day online event aimed at connecting organising, campaigning, activist research and academic work around border violence, racism, incarceration and abolitionism. We hope to bring together people struggling against the border in all its forms, from immigration detention, prison and militarised border sites, to the solidarity practices that resist expanding systems of everyday bordering. The conference will involve themed sessions, roundtables and several open discussion slots, with the aim to create an accessible, welcoming and practically useful set of conversations. Six themed panels invite contributions on data technologies, documenting border violence, feminist approaches, solidarity infrastructures, histories of border abolition, and state racism/racial capitalism. A shared gallery, digital archive, resource toolkit, library and smaller digital breakout spaces will provide ways to meet and learn beyond the panel discussions. We welcome contributions and ideas (whether for papers, presentations, workshops, artwork, creative sessions, questions or non-written media) that fit these themes or suggest others.Click here for more information.
Date:18-19 June 2021

18th IMISCOE Annual Conference Virtual Workshop Serries on ‘Developing a Research and Policy Agenda for Addressing Displacement and Migration in the Context of Disasters and Climate Change in Africa,’ April- July 2021

Natural hazards, disasters and climate change are among the leading drivers of human mobility across Africa. Yet, lawful pathways for those who move across international borders in this context remain limited, and often uncertain. This Virtual Workshop Series on ‘Developing a Research and Policy Agenda for Addressing Displacement and Migration in the Context of Disasters and Climate Change in Africa’ will provide an opportunity for academics and policy experts working across Africa to engage in discussion, form networks and plan future research on topics related to disaster and climate change-related displacement and migration.
Call for Participation and further information can be found here.

18th IMISCOE Annual Conference

Crossing Borders, Connecting Cultures  will be held 7-9 July 2021 in Luxembourg.

IASFM 18 (Updated)

The International Association for the Study of Forced Migration (IASFM18) Bi-annual conference: Disrupting Theory, Unsettling Practice: Towards Transformative Forced Migration Scholarship and Policy, will be held 26-28 July 2021 at the University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana.

JOB POSTS

Lecturer in Latinx Studies, Ethnicity, Race and Migration at Yale University

The Program in Ethnicity, Race, and Migration at Yale University invites applications for a lecturer’s position in the field of Latinx Studies with an initial three-year appointment beginning July 1, 2022. Review of applications will begin on March 16, 2021 and will continue until the position is filled. More information is available here.

Assistant Professor, Department of Geography, National University of Singapore

The Department of Geography at the National University of Singapore (NUS) seeks to appoint two established or emerging research leaders in the field of Social/Cultural Geography whose work addresses contemporary crises of sustainability in Asia. This could include, but is not limited to, issues of environmental justice, sustainable practices and futures, or the socio-spatial dimensions of climate change. Applications close 16 April. Further information is available here. 

PUBLICATIONS

New Paper: ‘Assessing refugee protection claims at Australian airports: the gap between law, policy and practice’

Network members Regina Jefferies, Dr Daniel Ghezelbash and Asher Hirsch have continued their analysis of protection claims at Australian airports with a new paper for the Melbourne University Law Review. Access the advance copy here

New Paper: ‘Unheard voices of the forced migrants in Armenia and Azerbaijan’

Network member D. G. Niruka Sanjeewani has published a new piece on ‘Unheard voices of the forced migrants in Armenia and Azerbaijan’ for the website Act For Displaced. Niruka is a lecturer in the Department of Strategic Studies, Faculty of Defence and Strategic Studies at General Sir John Kotelawala Defence University. Access the piece here.

New Podcast: ‘Temporary’

Don’t miss exploring the long-form stories, beautiful artwork and audio for ‘Temporary’ – a Kaldor Centre/Guardian Australia/UNSW Centre for Ideas initiative that tracks the experiences of refugees caught in Australia’s campaign to ‘stop the boats’. New instalments of the Temporary podcast are available now.

New Book: The Death of Asylum: Hidden Geographies of the Enforcement Archipelago, by Alison Mountz. University of Minnesota Press. Access the book here.

New Article: Climate Refugees in the Pacific By Saber Salem and Armin Rosencranz
50 Environmental Law Reporter 10540-10545 (2020). Access the article here.

IN THE NEWS

Reuters,  ‘Please Help Us:’ Migrants Exposed to Freezing Bosnia Winter, Await Chance to Reach EU (11 January 2021)

Aljazeera, Ocean Viking Ship Rescues Hundreds of Migrants Off Libya Coast  (23 January 2021)

Aljazeera, Ethiopia: UN Says 20,000 Refugees Missing in Tigray (2 February 2021)

UNHCR, Race Against Time to Help Thousands of Central African Refugees (12 February 2021).

Reuters, U.S. Presses Ethiopia to end Tigray Violence, Protect Civilians  (3 March 2021).

Arab News, Thousands of Refugees at Risk of Homelessness in Greece (5 March 2021)

France24, Refugees Trickle Across India Border from Myanmar Turmoil (5 March 2021).

The Guardian ,Refugee Rescuers Charged in Italy With Complicity in People Smuggling (4 March 2021).

SEND US YOUR NEWS AND EVENTS

Displaced Peoples (CRN11) newsletter is published quarterly.  The newsletter is a venue for sharing information regarding displaced peoples, broadly defined. Your contribution to the newsletter is crucial to its sustenance, success and quality. To contribute to the newsletter, please contact Veronica Fynn Bruey (veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org), Steven Bender (benders@seattleu.edu), and Azin Emami (aziemami@gmail.com). To subscribe or unsubscribe visit CRN 11 Displaced Peoples.

OCTOBER-NOVEMBER NEWSLETTER: VOLUME 2, ISSUE 10/11, 2020

OCTOBER-NOVEMBER NEWSLETTER: VOLUME 2, ISSUE 10/11, 2020

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WELCOME

LSA 2021 Chicago: Invitation to Submit Papers to CRN-11

Dear Colleagues:

Welcome to the CRN 11 Oct-Nov Newsletter: volume 2 Issue 10/11, the last and final issue for the year 2020. We really hope you and your family are thriving well amid the latest wave and resurgence of  the COVID-19 pandemic. These are indeed challenging times and so we want to make sure you know that you and your loved ones are in our thoughts and prayers.

Although we are still not certain when the pandemic is going to subside, our annual events are still being planned and organised.On 05 November 2020, the Law and Society Association announced the Call For Papers for the 2021 Chicago Annual Meeting: Crisis, Healing, Reimagining. With Alexandra Huneeus (University of Wisconsin-Madison) and Tom Ginsburg (University of Chicago) chairing, the Annual Meeting will take place between 27-30 May 2021. Submission is due on 15 December 2020. Please note that the anticipated time slot for the conference is 7:00 AM – 10:45 PM CST.

We invite you to submit your papers clearly stating keywords that include CRN 11: Displaced Peoples. Also, please consider volunteering as Chairs and Discussants for CRN 11 presentations.

We strongly encourage you to take a moment to browse the LSA website  2021 Chicago Annual Meeting for more information about abstract submission and volunteering.

Veronica Fynn Bruey and Steven Bender

DISPLACED PEOPLES’ RIGHTS AND PROTECTION

On 21 November the United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres welcomed the African Union’s (AU) appointment of three high-level envoys to help resolve the conflict in the Tigray region of Ethiopia, calling it an “initiative for peace.” The envoys are Joaquim Chissano, former President of Mozambique; Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, former Liberian President, and Kgalema Motlanthe, former President of South Africa. More information available here.

On 21 November 2020, Stéphane Dujarric, Spokesman for the United Nations Secretary-General, said that the Secretary-General condemns the rocket attacks in Kabul today which resulted in the death and injury of many civilians. He expresses his deepest sympathies to the families of the victims and wishes a speedy recovery to those injured. More information is available here.

On 16 October, the Peru’s Alianza Lima became the country’s first professional football club to partner with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees to support refugee integration. The club has pledged to provide talented young refugees and migrants with sports scholarships to attend its football academies and is also working with UNHCR to train coaches so they can better support Peruvian and refugee students and foster the values of inclusion and understanding. More information available here.

On 11 November 2020, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, Filippo Grandi warned that COVID-19 is worsening the plight of millions of stateless people worldwide. Marking the sixth anniversary of UNHCR’s #IBelong Campaign aimed at ending statelessness by 2024, Grandi called on world leaders to include and protect stateless populations and make bold and swift moves to eradicate statelessness. More information available here.

On 12 November, the United Nations Children’s Fund expressed concern about situation of children affected by typhoons in the Philippines. UNICEF is concerned for children and families who continue to bear the brunt of natural disasters in one of the most emergency prone countries in the world. More information available here.

GENERAL CALLS: CRN 11 EVENTS

Call For Papers: Law and Society Annual Meeting

The 2021 Law and Society Association Annual Meeting will be held, we hope, in Chicago, on 27-30 May. CRN 11 is inviting you to submit an abstract to be considered for a panel, salon, or round-table. In order to meet LSA deadline, kindly submit your abstract to Veronica Fynn Bruey and Steven Bender: veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org and benders@seattleu.edu by 15 December 2020. Visit here for more information.

Call For Members: Research and Development Committee

CRN 11 is currently recruiting members to join Magdalena Krystyna Butrymowicz who leads the Research and Development Committee. Those interested, please email Magdalena: magdalena.butrymowicz@upjp2.edu.pl. Deadline: Open

Call For Volunteers: Advertisement and Promotion Committee

CRN 11 is currently recruiting volunteers to lead the Advertisement and Promotion Committee. Those interested, please send a cover letter and CV to veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org. Deadline: Open

Call For Volunteers: Newsletter Editor

Interested in making the best use of your time during COVID-19 lockdown? Apply for the CRN11 newsletter editor position.  Submit a cover letter and CV to veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org  and benders@seattleu.edu. Deadline: Open

Become a CRN 11 Research Collaborator

Interested in being a bona fide research collaborator with CRN 11? Email veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org for details on how to apply. Deadline: Open

Invitation to be a Guest Blogger for CRN 11

Do you have an interesting story to tell about internal and international migration and displacement? CRN 11 is eager to share your piece as a guest blogger for our monthly newsletter.  Please submit your stories to veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org and benders@seattleu.edu. Deadline: Open

RESEARCH, AWARDS, AND SCHOLARSHIPS

National Scholarship Programme of the Slovak Republic, Scholarships for international students, PhD students, university teachers, researchers and artists. No Date.

University of Toronto, Metro International Secondary Academy Award of Excellence 2021, University of Toronto, Canada. Deadline: 31 December 2020.

UQIDAR joint-PhD Program 2020, Australia and India, University of Queensland. Deadline: 31 December 2020.

La Trobe University, International Scholarships 2021. Deadline: 31 December 2020.

Near East University, Scholarship Programs 2020-2021. Deadline: 31 December 2020.

Maharishi Markandeshwar University, Scholarships Program 2020-2021. Deadline: 31 December 2020.

Antioch University, Non-Tenure Track Faculty (Environmental Studies). Deadline: 13 January 2021.

American Society of International Law, 7th Annual International Refugee Law Student Writing Competition. Deadline 15 January 2021.

Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska Institutet Global Master’s Scholarships 2021, Sweden. Deadline: 15 January 2021.

Trinity University, International Student Financial Aid 2020. Deadline: 15 February 2021.

UPCOMING CONFERENCES/CALL FOR PAPERS

Colloque international de l’APAD 2020 (Postponed)

Colloque international de l’APAD 2020, Circulations in the Global South: Ethnographic Explorations of Globalized Exchanges (Les Circulations Dans le Sud Global: Ethnographies des échanges Mondialisés), 08-11 December 2020, l’ Université of Lomé, Togo. For more information contact: colloque@apad-association.org.

Law and Society Annual Meeting 2021

Submissions are now open for the Law and Society 2021 Annual Meeting: Crisis, Healing, and Re-imagining. Due to the pandemic, LSA is planning for a meeting with a mixed format with some events taking place in Chicago in-person, and many panels likely to take place virtually through an online platform. Deadline for submission is 31 December 2020.

Dialogues between Hispanic Studies and Indigenous Studies

This project attempts to illuminate the literary, oral, and non-alphabetic Indigenous pluriverse of Abiayala at the crossroads of the hemispheres of Hispanic Studies and Indigenous Studies. The editors invite proposals from scholars or authors, Indigenous and non-Indigenous, on the topic,  Tearing Down Disciplinary Barriers: Dialogues between Hispanic Studies and Indigenous Studies. Deadline for submission is 15 January 2021.

The Centre for History of the University of Lisbon

The Centre for History of the University of Lisbon, 11th Iberian African Studies, African Transits in the Global World: History and Memories, Heritage and Innovation, 21-23 January 2021, Lisbon, Portugal.

Freedom Network USA Human Trafficking Conference

The 2021 Freedom Network USA Human Trafficking Conference, 25-26 March 2021, Washington DC, USA.

Second Research Conference on Forced Displacement

The Joint Data Center’s 2nd Research Conference on Forced Displacement will be held on May 28-29, 2021 in Bogotá, Colombia, in partnership with the School of Economics at Universidad de los Andes.

IASFM 18 (Updated)

The International Association for the Study of Forced Migration (IASFM18) Bi-annual conference:
Disrupting Theory, Unsettling Practice: Towards Transformative Forced Migration Scholarship and Policy, will be held 26-28 July 2021 at the University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana.

Maastricht Centre for Citizenship, Migration, and Development

Visit the Maastricht Centre for Citizenship, Migration and Development, Maastricht University, The Netherlands for a list of events on Migration.

JOB POST

Assistant or associate Level Faculty Position, UC Berkeley

The School of Social Welfare and the Department of Ethnic Studies at the University of California, Berkeley invites applications for a jointly appointed faculty search. We seek a faculty member with expertise in Native American community health and well-being. The position will be a tenured faculty position at the level of Associate Professor, or tenure-track position at the level of Assistant Professor, with an expected start date of July 1, 2021. Rank will be determined based on qualifications and experience. Review of applications will begin on November 20, 2020. All materials and information should be submitted electronically. More materials may be requested of finalists. For full consideration, please apply by December 7, 2020. To apply, go to the following URL: https://aprecruit.berkeley.edu/JPF02788

PUBLICATIONS

Emily Ryo, Ingrid Eagly, Steven Shafer, Mirian Martinez-Aranda (Editors), Law and Society Review Special Symposium on Immigration Detention (20 November 2020).

Sam Grundy and Sarah Zingg, Community Stabilization – An approach for facilitating progress towards durable solutions and operationalizing the Humanitarian–Development–Peace Nexus: Lessons from Zimbabwe, Ethiopia and Somalia (12 November 2020).

Leyland Cecco, ‘We won’: Indigenous group in Canada scoops up billion dollar seafood firm (12 November 2020).

Alexander Aleinikoff and Donald Kerwin, Improving the US Immigration System in the First Year of the Biden Administration (10 November 2020).

Ahmet Içduygu and Jan Rath (Editors) International Migration, Volume 58, Issue 5 (October 2020).

Francesca Albanese and Lex Takkenberg, Palestinian Refugees in International Law (9 August 2020).

Yang Wang, Yining Feng, Qi Han, Jian Zuo, Raufdeen Rameezdeen, Perceived discrimination of displaced people in development-induced displacement and resettlement: The role of integration (June 2020).

Mahvish Kabir and Muhammad Sohail Afzal, COVID-19 pandemic and economic cost’ impact on forcibly displaced people (May June 2020).

Miriam Orcutt, Parth Patel, Rachel Burns, Lucinda Hiam, Rob Aldridge, Delan Devakumar, Bernadette Kumar, Paul Spiegel, Ibrahim Abubakar, Global call to action for inclusion of migrants and refugees in the COVID-19 response (23 April 2020).

IN THE NEWS

Aljazeera, ‘Save yourselves’: Ethiopia warns Tigrayans of Mekelle attack (22 November 2020).

Freedom United, Freedom United campaign success as Costa Rica ratifies Forced Labour Protocol (20 November 2020).

France24, Violent clashes over arrest of Ugandan opposition leader leave dozens dead (20 November 2020).

Shahid Hussain, The Nagorno-Karabakh Conflict: Diplomatic Repercussions for Pakistan (18 November 2020).

Mark Townsend, Migrant children’s welfare is being sidelined in the UK’s ‘brutal push to deport’ (15 November 2020).

SEND US YOUR NEWS AND EVENTS

Displaced Peoples (CRN11) newsletter is published monthly.  The newsletter is a venue for sharing information regarding displaced peoples, broadly defined. Your contribution to the newsletter is crucial to its sustenance, success and quality. To contribute to the newsletter, please contact Veronica Fynn Bruey and Steven Bender: veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org and benders@seattleu.edu. To subscribe or unsubscribe visit CRN 11 Displaced Peoples.

MAY NEWSLETTER: VOLUME 2, ISSUE 5

MAY NEWSLETTER: VOLUME 2, ISSUE 5

CRN11_Newsletter_Vol2Iss5_May2020_Final

WELCOME: RACISM and DISPLACEMENT

Dear Colleagues:

Welcome to the CRN 11 May 2020 Newsletter: volume 2, Issue 5.

Systemic and Institutional racism, a chronic disease, entered a new era. Anti-racism solidarity protests, sparked by the murder of George Floyd, an unarmed Black man who was pinned to the ground by a White police office kneeling on his neck, are sweeping across the world in defiance of a new surge in COVID-19 cases. In the United States alone, a total of two million cases and 115,644 deaths are reported; a quarter and half of all global cases and deaths confirmed, respectfully.

But the chronicity of structural racism across the world is not confined to police brutality, the criminal injustice system, or elite academic institutions, but alive and well in in literally every segment of society where there is racial diversity. Thus, the internally displaced peoples, especially those from the Global South, who “happen” to be Black and Brown peoples, are no exception.

Undisputedly, racism was the main cause of forced displacement during WWII, prompting the drafting of the 1951 Refugee Convention. Host countries’ relentless efforts to close their borders from displaced persons, migrants, refugees, and other immigrants, particularly those from war-torn countries in the Global South, are sustained by racism, xenophobia, and nationalism. Even after acceptance into a host country as a bona fide immigrant, displaced persons still face unending challenges of austerity measures, restrictive policies, detention, ill-treatment, violent attacks, and socio-economic discrimination. These challenges predispose displaced peoples to all forms of human rights abuses, including denial of protection and care for their basic needs.

Veronica Fynn Bruey and Steven Bender

DISPLACED PEOPLES’ RIGHTS AND PROTECTION

Global Protection Cluster marks the 20th anniversary of the Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement (GP20), with a multi-stakeholder 3-year plan: Plan of Action for Advancing Prevention, Protection and Solutions for Internally Displaced People (IDPs) 2018–2020. This Plan of Action centres around four priority issues identified at a 2017 IDP stakeholder meeting convened by the UN Special Rapporteur on the Human Rights of IDPs: participation of IDPs; national laws and policies addressing internal displacement; data and analysis on internal displacement; and addressing protracted displacement and facilitating durable solutions. More information is available here.

The United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR) adopted Resolution 74/131 on 18 December 2019 during the seventy-fourth session of the General Assembly. Recalling the Organization of African Unity Convention governing the specific aspects of refugee problems in Africa of 1969 and the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights, Resolution 74/131 “calls upon African States that have not yet signed or ratified the African Union Convention for the Protection and Assistance of Internally Displaced Persons in Africa to consider doing so as early as possible in order to ensure its wider implementation …”. More information is available here.

On 21 May 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR)signed a new agreement to strengthen and advance public health services for the millions of forcibly displaced people around the world. The agreement updates and expands an existing 1997 agreement between the two organizations. More information is available here.

Spokesperson for the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (UNHCHR), Rupert Colville, gave a press briefing on Yemen on 12 June 2020: He says, “We are alarmed at the desperate situation in Yemen, where the healthcare system is on the brink of collapse, and are fearful that countless lives will be lost not only to COVID-19 but as a result of malaria, cholera, dengue fever and other diseases. We urge international donors to provide immediate relief to help the millions who have already endured five years of warfare.” More information is available here.

A United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) report found that COVID-19 measures will likely to lead to an increase in migrant smuggling and human trafficking in longer term. According to the report, COVID-19 travel and movement restrictions are not stopping the movement of people fleeing conflict, human rights abuses, violence and dangerous living conditions, while the economic consequences of the pandemic are likely to lead to an increase in smuggling of migrants and trafficking in person flows from the most affected countries to more affluent destinations. More information is available here.

On 4 June, the International Organization for Migration (IOM) delivered the first round of cash assistance to vulnerable migrants in Iraq who have lost their incomes due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Based on the minimum expenditure basket, each individual received USD 182 to enable them to meet essential needs such as food, rent, and utilities. The recipients — Bangladeshi and Filipino nationals — were referred to IOM Iraq by their respective embassies. More information is available here.

The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) denounces the attack that killed 16 people, including five girls under the age of 15, on 3 June in Ituri Province in eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). “We condemn in the strongest possible terms this attack on innocent children,” said Edouard Beigbeder, UNICEF Representative in the DRC. “We call on all parties to respect the rights of women and children.” According to UN-verified reports, the attack took place in Moussa, a village in the Djugu area, north of the Ituri capital Bunia. More information is available here.

Statement by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) Executive Director Henrietta Fore on the Killing of Health Workers in Somalia. “I am appalled by the abduction and execution of seven health workers at a health center in southern Somalia.”Targeting health care workers is an egregious violation of international law and can constitute a war crime. These heinous attacks interfere with fundamental protections of the right to health and the perpetrators must be held accountable.” More information is available here.

EVENTS CANCELLATION AND COVID-19

CINETS/Border Criminologies Conference Postponed Until 2021

The fifth biennial CINETS conference, a joint project of the CINETS research network and Border Criminologies, is postponed to 2021. It was originally scheduled for September 2020 at Lewis & Clark Law School, but will be held at Leiden University in 2021.

 

GENERAL CALLS: CRN 11 EVENTS

The Journal of Internal Displacement—Call for Submissions

Theme: ‘A Crisis within a Crisis: Global Pandemics and Displacement’
Publication: January 2021 (Volume 11, Issue 1)
Submission Deadline: 1 September 2020

The Journal of Internal Displacement is now accepting submissions for its January 2021 (Volume 11, Issue 1). We are particularly interested in topics on global pandemics and displacement: SARS, Ebola, H1N1 and COVID 19. Download the Call for Paper here.

The Journal of Internal Displacement (ISSN 1920-5813 Online), established in 2009, is the only scholarly and inter-disciplinary platform for raising the profile of displaced populations through discussions, critical dialogue, emerging themes, reflections and explorations on a wide range of topics and regions around the globe. The JID promotes free and open access and does not charge authors for submissions. Visit our website to submit a paper or subscribe for free.

The Journal of Internal Displacement: Research Assistant Position

The Research Assistant will work closely with the Editor-in-Chief and assist the editorial team by researching, collecting, assessing data on institutions (e.g., libraries) and organisations (e.g., humanitarian agencies) interested in global displacement. The overall goal is to promote free and open access to the Journal Internal Displacement to help increase the JID’s impact factor. Download job ad here.

Call for Book Chapters

As the CRN 11 lead on the Research and Development Committee, I am planning to publish an international book on displaced children. I have already contacted potential publishers (e.g., Rowman & Littlefield). The book will attempt to engage academics, researchers, and specialists working on the topic of displaced peoples with a focus on displaced children globally. I am interested in papers concerning:

  • children rights
  • children with families
  • the right to home
  • displaced children
  • children in society
  • children and war
  • children and families of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIS)
  • children and families during migration

The deadline for chapter proposal is 25 June 2020. Please send your proposal to

magdalena.butrymowicz@upjp2.edu.pl and ollytola@yahoo.com

Call For Members: Research and Development Committee

CRN 11 is currently recruiting members to join Magdalena Krystyna Butrymowicz who leads the Research and Development Committee. Those interested, please email Magdalena: magdalena.butrymowicz@upjp2.edu.pl. Deadline: Open

Call For Volunteers: Newsletter Editor

CRN 11 is currently recruiting volunteers to lead the Advertisement and Promotion Committee. Those interested, please send a cover letter and CV to veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.orgDeadline: Open

Interested in making the best use of your time during COVID-19 lockdown? Apply for the CRN11 newsletter editor position.  Submit a cover letter and CV to veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org  and benders@seattleu.edu. Deadline: Open

Become a CRN 11 Research Collaborator

Interested in being a bona fide research collaborator with CRN 11? Email veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org for details on how to apply. Deadline: Open

Invitation to be a Guest Blogger for CRN 11

Do you have an interesting story to tell about internal and international migration and displacement? CRN 11 is eager to share your piece as a guest blogger for our monthly newsletter.  Please submit your stories to veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org and benders@seattleu.edu. Deadline: Open

Call for Papers: Improving Attention to Internal Displacement Globally

In February 2020, a new High-Level Panel on Internal Displacement appointed by the UN Secretary-General began work, preparing concrete and practical recommendations on improving the response to internal displacement, with particular attention to achieving solutions. It gives added momentum to existing initiatives, such as the GP20 process, launched on the 20th anniversary of the UN Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement in 2018. The Refugee Survey Quarterly will publish a special collection to engage researchers, practitioners and policy-makers afresh by feeding into this public debate and to promote new insights and thinking on policy-oriented challenges and solutions to internal displacement. Deadline: 5 July 2020. For more information, visit here.

A Call for Papers: The Displacees and Health – A Challenging Issue in Society

Refugees or internally displaced people are faced with multiple crises from local to international levels in the arena of detention, deportation, fragility, sexual orientation, gender identity, out place experience, armed non-state actors, HIV/AIDS, security, conflict, climate change, education of future generation, ethical concerns, human rights, disability etc. All these issues spur from the basic question of life which is close to the living conditions and life as human beings.  This seems to challenge the existence of health of man as a refugee irrespective of gender, class and citizenship. For more information contact, frnorbypaul@gmail.com.

Call for Pool of Experts: International Association of Refugees and Migration Judges

The International Association of Refugee and Migration Judges (IARMJ) is mid-way through a four year Framework Contract with the European Asylum Support Office (EASO) for the review, update and further development of the Professional Development Series (PDS) for members of courts and tribunals. IARMJ has decided that the midpoint of this Framework Contract is the right time to seek to refresh the pool and to update the particulars of those already included in it. For more information, visit here.

Call for Participants: Advancing Young Scholars and Peacebuilders Careers

We are pleased to announce the call for participants for our project “Advancing Young Scholars and Peacebuilders Careers”. The project aims to strengthen the capacities and future prospects for young researchers and civil society activists from the whole Caucasus region. Within the project we will: (1) offer training on vital skills and input on relevant topics by international experts and scholars; (2) facilitate dialogue and networking among selected candidates; and (3) strengthen the visibility of the participants within the expert community and enable knowledge transfer from the Caucasus into international discourses. To achieve these objectives, the project consists of several components. Deadline: 26 June 2020. For more information, visit here.

Call for Contributions: Comparative Perspectives on Migration, Diversities and the Pandemic

The Comparative Migration Studies issued an open call for articles on the relation between migration and the pandemic. We are particularly interested in articles that take a comparative approach. Prospective papers might examine the consequences of the pandemic for migrants and mobility across different regions and/or jurisdictions; compare policy responses and their effects across different cases; and consider the long-term consequences of the pandemic with regard to questions of diversity.Deadline: 15 July 2020.

RESEARCH, JOBS, AND SCHOLARSHIPS

University of British Columbia, President’s Academic Excellence Initiative PhD Award. Deadline: Ongoing.

Various University, Australian Awards Scholarships. Deadline: 30 June 2020.

Princeton University. Princeton Society of Fellows Fellowship Program in the Humanities and Social Sciences 2021-2024. Deadline: 4 August 2020/

University of Peace, Master of Laws in Transnational Crime and Justice. Deadline: 6 September 2020.

University of Pretoria, Mastercard Foundation Scholarship Program. Deadline: 31 August 2020.

Birkbeck University of London, School of Law Postgraduate Fee Awards for Master’s Students 2020. Deadline: 30 June 2020.

DePaul University, Part Time Faculty, Refugee and Forced Migration Studies. Deadline: 30 June 2020.

D-Prize supports a new entrepreneurs who can distribute proven poverty interventions. Deadline: 13 July 2020.

Journal of Transient Migration – call for submission on Contemporary dynamics of the future of work, the platform economy and transient migrants. Deadline: 15 July 2020.

UQIDAR joint-PhD Program 2020, Australia and India, University of Queensland. Deadline: 31 December 2020.

UPCOMING CONFERENCES

Summer School – Central Eurasian Studies Society

Summer School – Innovations in Disaster and Climate Risk Reduction, 29 June – 3 August 2020, CEU, Hungary.

Colloque international de l’APAD 2020 (Postponed)

Colloque international de l’APAD 2020, Circulations in the Global South: Ethnographic Explorations of Globalized Exchanges (Les Circulations Dans le Sud Global: Ethnographies des échanges Mondialisés), 08-11 December 2020, l’ Université of Lomé, Togo. For more information contact: colloque@apad-association.org.

The 17th IMISCOE Annual Conference 2020

The 2020 IMISCOE annual conference is going online! Europe’s largest research network of migration and integration scholars and practitioners is coming together for its first online annual conference. The first online annual conference will take place on July 1 and 2, 2020.

Dipartimento di Giurisprudenza Universita di Napoli Federico II

The 2020 EULAB Summer School on Labour Migration in the European Union, 7-16 July 2020,Department of Law of the University of Naples Federico II, Italy.

Association of Commonwealth University Summer School

Association of Commonwealth University Summer School 2020, The Migration Generation? Climate, Youth and Refugees, 2-10 August 2020, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast, Ghana.

The Migration Conference 2020

The Migration Conference Organizing Committee cordially invite you to submit abstract(s) to the 8th conference in the series which will take place on 9 to 11 September 2020, South East European University campus, Tetovo, North Macedonia.

The 6th International Conference on Conflict, Violence and Development

Due to the current situation of the COVID-19 pandemic, the VI International Conference “Conflict, Violence and Development”, organized by the Institute of Social and Economic Studies (IESE) will take place on 15th  and 16th  September 2020, in Maputo,Mozambique.

Utrecht University, The Netherlands: Connecting Europe Project

Utrecht University, The Netherlands and Connecting Europe Project Conference, Migrant Belongings: Digital Practices and the Everyday, 4-6 November 2020, Utrecht University, The Netherlands.

German Historical Institute

Annual Academic and Policy Symposium, Contested Meanings of Migration Facilitation: Emigration Agents, Coyotes, Rescuers, and Human Traffickers, 16-17 November 2020, Washington, DC.

The Centre for History of the University of Lisbon

The Centre for History of the University of Lisbon, 11th Iberian African Studies, African Transits in the Global World: History and Memories, Heritage and Innovation, 21-23 January 2021, Lisbon, Portugal.

VAD 2020

The VAD Conference 2020, African Challenges, has been postpone to 02-05 June 2021, co-hosted by the European Conference on African Studies, African Futures, in Cologne Germany.

Maastricht Centre for Citizenship, Migration, and Development

Visit the Maastricht Centre for Citizenship, Migration and Development, Maastricht University, The Netherlands for a list of events on Migration.

PUBLICATIONS

Comparative Migration Studies, Volume 8, Number 4, Special Issue on Externalization at Work – Responses to Migration Policies from the Global South (2020).

Ov Cristian Norocel, Anders Hellstrom, and Martin Bak Jorgensen, Nostalgia and Hope: Intersections Between Politics of Culture, Welfare, and Migration in Europe (2020).

John Washington, The Dispossessed: A Story of Asylum and the US-Mexican Border and Beyond (20 May 2020).

Agata Blaszczyk, War and Resettlement: Polish Resettlement Camps in the UK after the Second World War. The experience of creating a settlement policy for Polish political refugees (May 2020).

GENIDA Research Network – INDCaP Project, Recommendations on Internal Displacement in Africa (May 2020). The submissions were coordinated by IDRP Senior Research Associates Dr Romola Adeola, Dr Beatriz Sanchez and Dr Hana Asfour(a JID Editorial Team Member), with support from Prof. David Cantor.

Middle East Research Network – INDCaP Project, Key Problems and Possible Solutions to Internal Displacement in the Middle East ( May 2020). The submissions were coordinated by IDRP Senior Research Associates Dr Romola Adeola, Dr Beatriz Sanchez and Dr Hana Asfour (a Journal of Internal Displacement Editorial Team Member), with support from Prof. David Cantor.

Latin America Research Network – INDCaP Project,  Main Problems and Possible Solutions from Latin America (May 2020). The submissions were coordinated by IDRP Senior Research Associates Dr Romola Adeola, Dr Beatriz Sanchez and Dr Hana Asfour(a JID Editorial Team Member), with support from Prof. David Cantor.

Romola Adeola, Climate Change, Internal Displacement and the Kampala Convention (May 2020).

United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Migration, Displacement & Education: Building Bridges, Not Walls (2019).

Nazli Avdan, Visas and Walls: Borders Security in the Age of Terrorism (2019).

Javier S. Hidalgo, Unjust Borders: Individuals and the Ethics of Immigration (2019).

Margit Feischmidt, Ludger Pries, Celine Catat, Refugee Protection and Civil Society in Europe (2019).

Corporate Watch, The UK Border Regime: A Critical Guide, 2018

Jeffrey S. Kahn, Island of Sovereignty: Haitian Migration and the Borders of Empire (2018).

Nicola Mai, An Intimate Autoethnography of Migration, Sex Work, and Humanitarian Borders (2018).

Rimple Mehta, Women, Mobility and Incarceration: Love and Recasting of Self Across the Bangladesh-India Border (2018).

Ernesto Castaneda, A Place to Call Home: Immigrant Exclusion in New York, Paris, and Barcelona (2018).

IN THE NEWS

Julia Conley, 47 UN Human Rights Experts Condemn US Support for Israel’s ‘Unlawful’ Annexation Plan (16 June 2020).

UNHCR, UNHCR and Twitter launch 2020 World Refugee Day emoji created by Ivorian artist O’Plérou (15 June 2020).

Peter Yeung, Democratic Republic of the Congo Gears Up to Fight 11th Ebola Outbreak (15 June 2020).

Reeda Al Sabri Halawi, Human Rights Violations of Refugee Populations in Lebanon Amidst the COVID-19 Outbreak (12 June 2020).

IOM, Internally Displaced Persons Must Be “Agents of Their Own Solutions”: IOM Joins High-Level Discussion to Resolve Internal Displacement (11 June 2020).

Sylvia Nabanoba and Vanessa Zola, Restoring Sudan’s Forest Cover, One Tree at a Time (8 June 2020).

Maryla Klajn, Bordering the Biological Threat and the Questionable Logic of Poland’s “Closed Borders” Response to the Coronavirus Pandemic (8 June 2020).

Alicia Alvarez Gill, Forests in Guatemala Find New Guardians: Refugees (5 June 2020).

Antonio Vitorino, IOM Director General Message on World Environment Day (5 June 2020).

International Organization for Migration, Partners Offer “Filter Hotel” to Migrants Needing Quarantine in Northern Mexico (5 June 2020).

Patricia Zengerle, U.S. Bill to Pressure China Over Uighur Rights Goes to Trump for Decision (27 May 2020).

Noahiko Omata, Many Refugees Living in Nairobi Struggle to Survive Because of COVID-19 (20 May 2020).

Camilo Montoya-Galvez, U.S. suspends protections for migrant kids at border, expelling hundreds amid pandemic (7 May 2020).

Trishna as told to Pallavi Pundir, Being Forced into Sex Trade as a Teenager was Devastating. But being Shamed for it Made it Worse (6 May 2020).

United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, COVID-19: UNODC Warns of Increased Risks to Human Trafficking Victims (5 May 2020).

Deutsch Welle, Coronavirus Threatens Millions Displaced by Extreme Weather and Conflict (28 April 2020).

António Guterres, The Fury of the Virus Illustrates the Folly of War (23 March 2020).

Tasmasha Hussein, Power Talks (18 June 2019).

Rahaf Albalkhi, Power Talks (18 June 2019).

SEND US YOUR NEWS AND EVENTS

Displaced Peoples (CRN11) newsletter is published monthly.  The Newsletter is a venue for sharing information regarding displaced peoples, broadly defined. Your contribution to the monthly newsletter is crucial to its sustenance, success and quality. To contribute to the Newsletter, please contact Veronica Fynn Bruey and Steven Bender: veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org and benders@seattleu.edu. To subscribe or unsubscribe visit CRN 11 Displaced Peoples.

 

APRIL NEWSLETTER: VOLUME 2, ISSUE 4

APRIL NEWSLETTER: VOLUME 2, ISSUE 4

CRN11_Newsletter_Vol2Iss4_April2020_Final

WELCOME: COVID-19 & Displacement

Dear Colleagues:
Welcome to the CRN 11 April 2020 Newsletter: volume 2, Issue 4. Even though there is a sign of developing treatment for COVID-19 and a historic decline in new cases, we are still faced with a major public health emergency, especially in the United States. At 30 April 2020, the United States had 1.1 million confirmed cases (a third of the global cases of 3.1 million) and 57,400 deaths due to Coronavirus.

In addition to the race against time to discover vaccines and treatments, state-of-the art technology is also making its mark. The University of Washington is teaming up with Microsoft to develop a “contact-tracing app that helps public health agencies and doesn’t compromise your privacy”. Similarly, Apple and Google are partnering to release application programming interfaces (APIs) between Android and IOS devices using apps from public health authorities on COVID-19 contact tracing.

In spite of the immense progress being made to manage and curb COVID-19, the experience of displaced peoples is grimmer.  Displaced Peoples (i.e., internally displaced peoples, refugees and forced migrants) continue to be disproportionally impacted by COVID-19. On 20 April 2020, President Donald J. Trump tweeted that he would be “signing an Executive Order to temporarily suspend immigration into the United States”. In France, a country with the fifth highest number of COVID-19 cases in the world, homeless peoples are “fined for not staying indoors”.

In spite of the challenge faced by Displaced Peoples, some  efforts are being made by organizations such as UNICEF and the Zolberg’s Institute to ensure their protection.

Veronica Fynn Bruey and Steven Bender

DISPLACED PEOPLES’ RIGHTS AND PROTECTION

According to UN Women, emerging data shows that since the outbreak of COVID-19, reports of violence against women, and particularly domestic violence, have increased in certain countries as security, health, and money worries create tensions and strains accentuated by the cramped and confined living conditions of lockdown. More information is available here.

Working in close coordination with the World Health Organization (WHO), the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) will support countries to assess the social and economic impacts of COVID-19 and take urgent recovery measures to minimize long-term impact, particularly for vulnerable and marginalized groups. More information is available here.

The United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) says respect for human rights across the spectrum, including economic and social rights, and civil and political rights, will be fundamental to the success of the public health response. More information is available here.

The United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR) says the coronavirus pandemic endangers everyone on the planet, including refugees and other people displaced by conflict or persecution. More information is available here.

The International Chamber of Commerce in its Call to action to save Small and Medium Size Enterprise (SMEs) stated that governments should ensure tailored support for the most marginalized workers including women, migrant workers and refugees to avert worse-case scenarios of COVID-19. More information is available here.

The International Organization for Migration (IOM) says COVID-19 is having an unprecedented impact on mobility both in terms of regimes for border and migration management, and the situation of all people on the move, including those displaced by conflict or disaster. More information is available here.

The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) Executive Director, Henrietta Fore cautioned that COVID-19 will almost certainly gain foothold in refugee camps, crowded receptions centers, or detention facilities holding migrant families. Given how quickly the virus is spreading, such a scenario is looking imminent. More information is available here.

The World Bank, United Nations Educational (UNESCO), Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), UNICEF, and theWorld Food Program (WPF) issued a new guideline for reopening schools stressing the exacerbated negative impact and disruption prolonged closure of schools can have on marginalized children which includes the forcibly displaced. More information is available here.

A joint statement by the Special Rapporteur on the Human Rights of IDPs, UNHCR, UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), and IOM marked the 10th anniversary of the adoption of the Protection and Assistance of Internally Displaced Persons in Africa (the Kampala Convention) on 23 October 2019. More information is here.

Lancet Migration Global Collaboration to advance migration health: Leaving no one behind in the COVID-19 pandemic is a call to urgent global action to include migrants and refugees in the COVID-19 response. More information is available here.

Human mobility and Human Rights in the COVID-19 Pandemic: Principles of protection for migrants, refugees, and other displaced persons. More information is available here.

EVENTS CANCELLATION AND COVID-19

LSA 2020 In-Person Annual Meeting Cancelled

On 20 March 2020, the Law and Society In-Person Annual Meeting was canceled and converted to a Virtual Conference expected to occur from 27 May to 31 May 2020.

IASFM 18 In-Person Annual Meeting Postponed

Due to current travel restrictions related to the COVID-19 virus, and uncertainties about when these restrictions will be lifted, the IASFM Executive Committee has taken the difficult decision to postpone the Ghana conference to July 26-29, 2021. If your paper or panel has been accepted, this acceptance will be carried over to next year.

GENERAL CALLS: CRN 11 EVENTS

The Journal of Internal Displacement—Call for Submissions

Theme: ‘A Crisis within a Crisis: Global Pandemics and Displacement’
Publication: January 2021 (Volume 11, Issue 1)
Submission Deadline: 1 September 2020

The Journal of Internal Displacement is now accepting submissions for its January 2021 (Volume 11, Issue 1). We are particularly interested in topics on global pandemics and displacement: SARS, Ebola, H1N1 and COVID 19. Download the Call for Paper here.

The Journal of Internal Displacement (ISSN 1920-5813 Online), established in 2009, is the only scholarly and inter-disciplinary platform for raising the profile of displaced populations through discussions, critical dialogue, emerging themes, reflections and explorations on a wide range of topics and regions around the globe. The JID promotes free and open access and does not charge authors for submissions. Visit our website to submit a paper or subscribe for free.

The Journal of Internal Displacement: Research Assistant Position

The Research Assistant will work closely with the Editor-in-Chief and assist the editorial team by researching, collecting, assessing data on institutions (e.g., libraries) and organisations (e.g., humanitarian agencies) interested in global displacement. The overall goal is to promote free and open access to the Journal Internal Displacement to help increase the JID’s impact factor. Download job ad here.

Call for Book Chapters

As the CRN 11 lead on the Research and Development Committee, I am planning to publish an international book on displaced children. I have already contacted potential publishers (e.g., Rowman & Littlefield). The book will attempt to engage academics, researchers, and specialists working on the topic of displaced peoples with a focus on displaced children globally. I am interested in papers concerning:

  • children rights
  • children with families
  • the right to home
  • displaced children
  • children in society
  • children and war
  • children and families of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIS)
  • children and families during migration

The deadline for chapter proposal is 25 June 2020. Please send your proposal to
magdalena.butrymowicz@upjp2.edu.pl and ollytola@yahoo.com

Call For Members: Research and Development Committee

CRN 11 is currently recruiting members to join Magdalena Krystyna Butrymowicz who leads the Research and Development Committee. Those interested, please email Magdalena: magdalena.butrymowicz@upjp2.edu.pl.

Call For Volunteers: Newsletter Editor

CRN 11 is currently recruiting volunteers to lead the Advertisement and Promotion Committee. Those interested, please send a cover letter and CV to veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org.

Interested in making the best use of your time during COVID-19 lockdown? Apply for the CRN11 newsletter editor position.  Submit a cover letter and CV to veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org  and benders@seattleu.edu.

Become a CRN 11 Research Collaborator

Interested in being a bona fide research collaborator with CRN 11? Email veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org for details on how to apply.

Invitation to be a Guest Blogger for CRN 11

Do you have an interesting story to tell about internal and international migration and displacement? CRN 11 is eager to share your piece as a guest blogger for our monthly newsletter.  Please submit your stories to veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org and benders@seattleu.edu.

Call for Abstracts: APHA’s 2020 Annual Meeting

The International Health Section of the American Public Health Association has put out a special call for abstracts on the COVID-19 pandemic for the 2020 APHA Annual Meeting. Submission on the following themes are encouraged:

  • COVID-19 effects on the strength and resiliency of health systems
  • COVID-19 among displaced populations or in conflict settings
  • COVID-19 effects on NCDs (mental health, chronic conditions/comorbidities, etc.)
  • COVID-19 and human rights
  • COVID-19 and social determinants/marginalized populations
  • COVID-19 as a threat to and an opportunity for the integration of medical and public health systems
  • COVID-19 globalism, and the goals of global health

For more information contact, Jessica Keralis: jmkeralis@gmail.com

Call to Participate in LSA 2020 Virtual Conference

Despite the LSA 2020 face-to-face meeting cancellation, CRN 11 is calling on its members to kindly register and participate in the LSA 2020 Virtual Conference (probably via Zoom meetings). Here are some of the Program Committee Plans:

  • Paper sessions that allow panelists to deliver papers to an audience of interested participants, with those participants able to engage in meaningful ways – with a “chat” function, everyone can ask their question!
  • Plenaries will be available both live and recorded giving you an option to attend even if it’s scheduled at an inconvenient time.
  • Author Meets Reader sessions may be longer, allowing us to discuss more thoroughly the newest books in our field.
  • Professional development panels – on getting grants, publication, tenure, and other topics – available at the LSA web site all year long.

Since plans are underway and details are still sketchy, please do not hesitate to forward your questions to veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org.

Call for Publications: Quarantine Across Borders

Quarantine Across Borders: A call for blog/e-book entries of personal narratives, commentaries, and critical essays on immigrant, diasporic, borderland communities during the lockdown, quarantine, or shelter-in-place issued during the COVID-19 global pandemic. For more information contact Dr. Srivi Ramasubramanian at srivi@tamu.edu or visit here.

Call for Papers: Improving Attention to Internal Displacement Globally

In February 2020, a new High-Level Panel on Internal Displacement appointed by the UN Secretary-General began work, preparing concrete and practical recommendations on improving the response to internal displacement, with particular attention to achieving solutions. It gives added momentum to existing initiatives, such as the GP20 process, launched on the 20th anniversary of the UN Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement in 2018. The Refugee Survey Quarterly will publish a special collection to engage researchers, practitioners and policy-makers afresh by feeding into this public debate and to promote new insights and thinking on policy-oriented challenges and solutions to internal displacement. Deadline for submission is 5 July 2020. For more information, visit here.

RESEARCH, JOBS, AND SCHOLARSHIPS

UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, Job Opportunities. Deadline: Various

UNHCR is hiring international professional staff, vacancies. Deadline: Various

Rotary Peace Fellowship, Each year, Rotary awards up to 130 fully funded fellowships for dedicated leaders from around the world to study at one of our peace centers. Published date: 3 May 2020.

1325 and Beyond, An international essay competition. Deadline: 10 May 2020.

UN Women, Programme Analyst (Gender, Forced Migration and Trafficking). Deadline: 11 May 2020.

Galina Starovoitova Fellowship on Human Rights and Conflict Resolution, Kennan Institute, USA. Deadline: 15 May 2020.

GEMMA, Spain, Master’s degree in Women’s and Gender Studies 2020. Deadline: 15 May 2020.

University of Pannonia, Hungary, International Studies Master Program 2020. Deadline: 30 May 2020.

Sheffield Methods Institute PhD scholarships, UK. Deadline: 31 May 2020.

Birkbeck University of London, School of Law Postgraduate Fee Awards for Master’s Students 2020. Deadline: 30 June 2020.

DePaul University, Part Time Faculty, Refugee and Forced Migration Studies. Deadline: 30 June 2020.

D-Prize supports a new entrepreneurs who can distribute proven poverty interventions. Deadline: 13 July 2020.

Journal of Transient Migration – call for submission on Contemporary dynamics of the future of work, the platform economy and transient migrants. Deadline: 15 July 2020.

UQIDAR joint-PhD Program 2020, Australia and India, University of Queensland. Deadline: 31 December 2020.

UPCOMING CONFERENCES

Conflict Research Network West Africa

Conflict Research Network West Africa, Micro Dynamics of Armed Conflict and Political Violence in West Africa, 20-23 April 2020, Lagos State University, Lagos State, Nigeria.

International Conference at Universidad de la Salle

Boundaries of the Natural: Matter, Territory, Community (Limites de lo natural: Materia, Territorio, Comunidad), 28-30 May2020, Universidad de la Salle, Bogotá, Colombia.

Armenia and Byzantium Without Borders III

Armenia & Byzantium Without Borders III’ Austrian Academy of Sciences, 8–10 May 2020, Vienna, Austria.

ZEW Research Department

The Integration of Immigrants and Attitudes towards the Welfare State (IMES) group, a joint research group of ZEW Mannheim and the Mannheim Centre for European Social Research (MZES) at the University of Mannheim Workshop, Immigration, Integration and Attitudes, 5-6 June 2020, Mannheim, Germany.

Summer School – Central Eurasian Studies Society

Summer School – Innovations in Disaster and Climate Risk Reduction, 29 June – 3 August 2020, CEU, Hungary.

Colloque international de l’APAD 2020

Colloque international de l’APAD 2020, Les Circulations Dans le Sud Global: Ethnographies des échanges Mondialisés, 23-26 June 2020, l’ Université of Lomé, Togo. For more information contact:Elieth Eyebiyi (eelieth@yahoo.fr) and Johara Berriane (johara.berriane@gmail.com).

Dipartimento di Giurisprudenza Universita di Napoli Federico II

The 2020 EULAB Summer School on Labour Migration in the European Union, 7-16 July 2020, Department of Law of the University of Naples Federico II, Italy.

VAD 2020

VAD 2020, Africa Challenges, Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, 22-25 September 2020, Frankfurt, Germany.

Association of Commonwealth University Summer School

Association of Commonwealth University Summer School 2020, The Migration Generation? Climate, Youth and Refugees, 2-10 August 2020, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast, Ghana.

Utrecht University, The Netherlands: Connecting Europe Project

Utrecht University, The Netherlands and Connecting Europe Project Conference, Migrant Belongings: Digital Practices and the Everyday, 4-6 November 2020, Utrecht University, The Netherlands.

German Historical Institute

Annual Academic and Policy Symposium, Contested Meanings of Migration Facilitation: Emigration Agents, Coyotes, Rescuers, and Human Traffickers, 16-17 November 2020, Washington, DC.

The Centre for History of the University of Lisbon

The Centre for History of the University of Lisbon, 11th Iberian African Studies, African Transits in the Global World: History and Memories, Heritage and Innovation, 21-23 January 2021, Lisbon, Portugal.

Maastricht Centre for Citizenship, Migration, and Development

Visit the Maastricht Centre for Citizenship, Migration and Development, Maastricht University, The Netherlands for a list of events on Migration.

PUBLICATIONS

IOM, Migration Research Series No. 60 (2020).

IOM, International Migration Early View Articles (5 May 2020).

IOM, Migration Policy Practice (Volume X, Number 2 (April-June 2020).

Refugee Law Initiative, Blog on Refugee Law and Forced Migration (April 2020).

Julia Sachseder, Cleared for investment? The intersections of transnational capital, gender, and race in the production of sexual violence and internal displacement in Colombia’s armed conflict (3 March 2020).

Roberto Ariel Abeldano Zuniga and Javiera Fanta Garrido, Internal displacement due to disasters in Latin America and the Caribbean (15 February 2020).

Tanja Bastia and Ronald Skeldon, Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development (14 February 2020).

Sergio Parra Cely and Cotilde Mahe, Does internal displacement affect educational achievement in host communities? (January 2020).

IN THE NEWS

Wired, For homeless people, COVID-19 is horror on top of horror (2 April 2020).

The Guardian, Slavery in New Zealand: Inside the story of the Samoan chief who abused power for profit (3 April 2020).

Fabio Teixeira, Olympic games building firm, cult added to Brazil’s slavery “dirty list” (3 April 2020).

Faras Ghani, Libya: Coronavirus outbreak could be “catastrophic” for migrants (4 April 2020).

Chantal da Silva, ICE faces criticism after sheriff’s department called on detainees refusing to work over coronavirus fears (4 April 2020).

Amnesty International, Qatar: Migrant workers tricked into detention then expelled during COVID-19 pandemic (15 April 2020).

IOM, COVID-19 Analytical Snapshots captures the latest information and analysis in a fast-moving environment (20 April 2020).

The Global Legal Action Network and the World Uyghur Congress, UK: Halt forced prison labour goods from China (23 April 2020).

Timour Azhari and Fidelis Mbah, Lebanon arrests suspects for putting Nigerian worker up “for sale” (23 April 2020).

Danica Jorden, COVID-19 sweeping through US immigrant farmworker and meatpacker ranks (23 April 2020).

Aidan McQuade and Ritwajit Das, COVID-19 poses new risks to India’s enslaved waste pickers (27 April 2020).

Borzou Daragahi and Bel Trew, “Living in absolute despair”: Coronavirus trapping domestic workers in virtual “slavery” (30 April 2020).

Freedom United, Petition to End Forced Labor in Qatar (1 May 2020).

SEND US YOUR NEWS AND EVENTS

Displaced Peoples (CRN11) newsletter is published monthly.  The Newsletter is a venue for sharing information regarding displaced peoples, broadly defined. Your contribution to the monthly newsletter is crucial to its sustenance, success and quality. To contribute to the Newsletter, please contact Veronica Fynn Bruey and Steven Bender: veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org and benders@seattleu.edu. To subscribe or unsubscribe visit CRN 11 Displaced Peoples.

FEBRUARY-MARCH NEWSLETTER: VOLUME 2, ISSUE 2-3

FEBRUARY-MARCH NEWSLETTER: VOLUME 2, ISSUE 2-3

CRN11_Newsletter_Vol2Iss2&3_Feb-Mar2020_Final

WELCOME: COVID-19 & Displacement

Dear Colleagues:

Welcome to the CRN 11 February-March 2020 Newsletter, our second issue in volume 2. Humanity is faced with a public health emergency- the coronavirus disease.

On 10 December 2019, one of the earliest known cases of a newly discovered coronavirus was reported in Wuhan Central Hospital. By 31 December 2019, 27 cases of what is now known as COVID-19 were confirmed by the Wuhan health officials as China officially notifies the World Health Organisation. On 30 January 2020, the World Health Organisation declared the Outbreak of COVID-19 a Public Health Emergency of International Concern and the Director General raised the outbreak to a pandemic on 11 March 2020.  According to the World Health Organisation Situation Report 75, as of 4 April 2020, there were 1,051,635 cases and 56,935 deaths of COVID-19 reported in 208 countries and territories world-wide.

We are aware of the disproportional impact of COVID-19 on vulnerable populations especially internally displaced peoples, refugees and forced migrants. We know how challenging it can be to practice social distancing in transit whether during flight or displaced at a make-shift camp. Whatever the situation, we encourage you to do all you can to keep surviving.

Interested in making the best use of your time during COVID-19 lockdown? Apply for the CRN11 newsletter editor position.  Submit a cover letter and CV to veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org  and benders@seattleu.edu.

Veronica Fynn Bruey and Steven W. Bender

DISPLACED PEOPLES’ RIGHTS AND PROTECTION

The United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights says there should be no exception with COVID-19: People with disabilities, older persons, minority communities, indigenous peoples, internally displaced people, people affected by extreme poverty and living in overcrowded settings, people who live in residential institutions, people in detention, homeless people, migrants and refugees, people who use drugs, LGBT, and gender diverse persons – these and other groups need to receive support from governments. More information is available here.

According to the United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR), although the number of reported and confirmed cases of COVID-19 infection among refugees remains low, over 80 per cent of the world’s refugee population and nearly all the internally displaced people live in low to middle-income countries, many of which have weaker health, water and sanitation systems and need urgent support. The UN Refugee Agency provides a series of measures it is taking in its field operations to help respond to the COVID-19 public health emergency and prevent further spread. More information is available here.

The International Chamber of Commerce is supporting a call from the United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR) to prevent further spread of COVID-19 to the world’s most vulnerable communities and to advocate for inclusion of refugees and displaced people in national response plans. More information is available here.

The International Organization for Migration (IOM) released guidance for employers and businesses on protection of migrant workers during the COVID-19 crisis. Antonio Vitorino, IOM Director General, said the private sector, governments, and other stakeholders must protect the rights and well-being of the estimated 164 million international migrant workers and their communities around the world, as the number of COVID-19 cases passed 1.3 million. More information is available here.

In a statement released by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) Executive Director, Henrietta Fore cautioned that COVID-19 will almost certainly gain foothold in refugee camps, crowded receptions centers, or detention facilities holding migrant families. Given how quickly the virus is spreading, such a scenario is looking imminent. More information is available here.

In a press release, the International Organization for Migration (IOM) raised concern over increasing COVID-19 cases recorded in the Greece Mainland Refugee and Migrant Camp. Some 23 migrants have tested positive for COVID-19 in the Ritsona open accommodation site in Central Greece – an IOM-managed camp which hosts 2,700 people. More information is available here.

The International Organization for Migration (IOM) and the United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR)temporarily suspend resettlement travel for refugees. As countries drastically reduce entry into their territories owing to the COVID-19 global health crisis, and restrictions around international air travel are introduced, travel arrangements for resettling refugees are currently subject to severe disruptions. Some states have also placed a hold on resettlement arrivals given their public health situation, which impacts their capacity to receive newly resettled refugees. More information is available here.

A joint statement by the Special Rapporteur on the Human Rights of IDPs, UNHCR, OCHA and IOM marked the 10thanniversary of the adoption of the Protection and Assistance of Internally Displaced Persons in Africa (the Kampala Convention) on 23 October 2019. This ground-breaking treaty (the Kampala Convention) has been ratified by 28 of the 55 countries on the continent. As the world’s first and only continent-wide legally binding instrument for the protection and assistance of internally displaced persons (IDPs), the Kampala Convention is a testament to the determination of African States to address the multiple challenges of IDPs. More information is here.

EVENTS CANCELLATION AND COVID-19

Postponement of the 24th Annual Conference of ASRF

On 12 March 2020, the Executive Committee of the African Studies and Research Forum decided to postpone the 24th Annual Conference, which was scheduled to be held in Cape Coast, Ghana, from March 26-28, 2020.

LSA 2020 In-Person Annual Meeting Cancelled

On 20 March 2020, the Law and Society In-Person Annual Meeting was canceled, and plans are underway to move to a Virtual Conference. If you have registered for the in-person Annual Meeting and you choose to join the virtual meeting, your registration will be honoured, otherwise, you can request a refund of your registration fee and not participate in the virtual meeting by filling out the refund form by April 15th. Refunds will not be processed after 15 April and you will remain in the program.

IASFM 18 In-Person Annual Meeting Postponed

Due to current travel restrictions related to the COVID-19 virus, and uncertainties about when these restrictions will be lifted, the IASFM Executive Committee has taken the difficult decision to postpone the Ghana conference to July 26-29, 2021. If your paper or panel has been accepted, this acceptance will be carried over to next year.

GENERAL CALLS: CRN 11 EVENTS

Call to Participate in LSA 2020 Virtual Conference

Despite the LSA 2020 face-to-face meeting cancellation, CRN 11 is calling on its members to kindly register and participate in the LSA 2020 Virtual Conference (probably via Zoom meetings). Here are some of the Program Committee Plans:

  • Paper sessions that allow panelists to deliver papers to an audience of interested participants, with those participants able to engage in meaningful ways – with a “chat” function, everyone can ask their question!
  • Plenaries will be available both live and recorded giving you an option to attend even if it’s scheduled at an inconvenient time.
  • Author Meets Reader sessions may be longer, allowing us to discuss more thoroughly the newest books in our field.
  • Professional development panels – on getting grants, publication, tenure, and other topics – available at the LSA web site all year long.

Since plans are underway and details are still sketchy, please do not hesitate to forward your questions to me at veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org.

Call for Book Chapters

As the CRN 11 lead on the Research and Development Committee, I am planning to publish an international book on displaced children. I have already contacted potential publishers (e.g., Rowman & Littlefield). The book will attempt to engage academics, researchers, and specialists working on the topic of displaced peoples with a focus on displaced children globally. I am interested in papers concerning:

  • children rights
  • children with families
  • the right to home
  • displaced children
  • children in society
  • children and war
  • children and families of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIS)
  • children and families during migration

The deadline for chapter proposal is 25 June 2020. Please send your proposal to

magdalena.butrymowicz@upjp2.edu.pl and ollytola@yahoo.com

Call For Members: Research and Development Committee

CRN 11 is currently recruiting members to join Magdalena Krystyna Butrymowicz who leads the Research and Development Committee. Those interested, please email Magdalena: magdalena.butrymowicz@upjp2.edu.pl.

Call For Volunteers

CRN 11 is currently recruiting volunteers to lead the Advertisement and Promotion Committee. Those interested, please send a cover letter and CV to veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org.

The Journal of Internal Displacement

Are you interested in being a part of a vibrant and scholarly network of passionate academic-advocates of displaced peoples globally? Consider applying for the following positions with the

Journal of Internal Displacement: editorial board membership, reviewer, and research assistant. Contact Veronica Fynn Bruey, Editor-in-Chief for more information at veronica.fynnbruey@journalofinternaldisplacement.com.

The Journal of Internal Displacement—Call for Submissions

The Journal of Internal Displacement (ISSN 1920-5813 Online) is now accepting submissions for its January 2021 issue (Volume 11, Issue 1). Established in 2009, the Journal of Internal Displacement is the only scholarly and inter-disciplinary platform for raising the profile of displaced populations through discussions, critical dialogue, emerging themes, reflections and explorations on a wide range of topics and regions around the globe. The JID promotes free and open access and does not charge authors for submissions. Visit our website to submit a paper or subscribe for free.

COVID-19 & Queer Asylum

COVID-19 & Queer Asylum is a virtual symposium featuring NGO representatives and lawyers working on queer asylum, LGBTQI+ activists and LGBTQI+ persons seeking asylum and refugees from Germany. This symposium is intended to provide a platform for discussing the manner in which such pandemic and its political responses affects LGBTQI+ persons in terms of  isolation and trauma, access to health services, and EU-policy. These panels are followed by a counselling forum led by lawyers and  judges. Join in from 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM on 29 April 2020.  For more information, click here.

Become a CRN 11 Research Collaborator

Interested in being a bona fide research collaborator with CRN 11? Email veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org for details on how to apply.

Invitation to be a Guest Blogger for CRN 11

Do you have an interesting story to tell about internal and international migration and displacement? CRN 11 is eager to share your piece as a guest blogger for our monthly newsletter.  Please submit your stories to veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org and benders@seattleu.edu.

RESEARCH, JOBS, AND SCHOLARSHIPS

Merian Institute for Advanced Studies in Africa, Two Interdisciplinary Fellow Groups (Junior/Senior), University of Ghana, Ghana. Deadline: 10 April 2020.

IASH-CTPI Duncan Forrester Fellowship, University of Edinburgh, UK. Deadline: 30 April 2020.

University of Edinburgh – University of Leiden Joint Funded PhD Studentship, UK and The Netherlands. Deadline: 1 May 2020.

Galina Starovoitova Fellowship on Human Rights and Conflict Resolution, Kennan Institute, USA. Deadline: 15 May 2020.

Sheffield Methods Institute PhD scholarships, UK. Deadline: 31 May 2020.

Journal of Transient Migration – call for submission on Contemporary dynamics of the future of work, the platform economy and transient migrants. Deadline: 15 July 2020.

UQIDAR joint-PhD Program 2020, Australia and India, University of Queensland. Deadline: 31 December 2020.

UPCOMING CONFERENCES

Conflict Research Network West Africa

Conflict Research Network West Africa, Micro Dynamics of Armed Conflict and Political Violence in West Africa, 20-23 April 2020, Lagos State University, Lagos State, Nigeria.

International Conference at Universidad de la Salle

Boundaries of the Natural: Matter, Territory, Community (Limites de lo natural: Materia, Territorio, Comunidad), 28-30 May2020, Universidad de la Salle, Bogotá, Colombia.

Armenia and Byzantium Without Borders III

Armenia & Byzantium Without Borders III’ Austrian Academy of Sciences, 8–10 May 2020, Vienna, Austria.

ZEW Research Department

The Integration of Immigrants and Attitudes towards the Welfare State (IMES) group, a joint research group of ZEW Mannheim and the Mannheim Centre for European Social Research (MZES) at the University of Mannheim Workshop, Immigration, Integration and Attitudes, 5-6 June 2020, Mannheim, Germany.

Summer School – Central Eurasian Studies Society

Summer School – Innovations in Disaster and Climate Risk Reduction, 29 June – 3 August 2020, CEU, Hungary.

Colloque International de l’APAD 2020

Colloque international de l’APAD 2020, Les Circulations Dans le Sud Global: Ethnographies des échanges Mondialisés, 23-26 June 2020, l’ Université of Lomé, Togo. For more information contact: Elieth Eyebiyi (eelieth@yahoo.fr) and Johara Berriane (johara.berriane@gmail.com).

Dipartimento di Giurisprudenza Universita di Napoli Federico II

The 2020 EULAB Summer School on Labour Migration in the European Union, 7-16 July 2020,Department of Law of the University of Naples Federico II, Italy.

VAD 2020

VAD 2020, Africa Challenges, Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, 22-25 September 2020, Frankfurt, Germany.

Association of Commonwealth University Summer School

Association of Commonwealth University Summer School 2020, The Migration Generation? Climate, Youth and Refugees, 2-10 August 2020, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast, Ghana.

Utrecht University, The Netherlands: Connecting Europe Project

Utrecht University, The Netherlands and Connecting Europe Project Conference, Migrant Belongings: Digital Practices and the Everyday, 4-6 November 2020, Utrecht University, The Netherlands.

German Historical Institute

Annual Academic and Policy Symposium, Contested Meanings of Migration Facilitation: Emigration Agents, Coyotes, Rescuers, and Human Traffickers, 16-17 November 2020, Washington, DC.

The Centre for History of the University of Lisbon

The Centre for History of the University of Lisbon, 11th Iberian African Studies, African Transits in the Global World: History and Memories, Heritage and Innovation, 21-23 January 2021, Lisbon, Portugal.

Maastricht Centre for Citizenship, Migration, and Development

Visit the Maastricht Centre for Citizenship, Migration and Development, Maastricht University, The Netherlands for a list of events on Migration.

PUBLICATIONS

Cees Gorter, Peter Nijkamp, Jacques Poot, Crossing Borders: Regional and Urban Perspectives on International Migration (30 June 2020).

Caroline Favas, Guidance for the Prevention of COVID-19 Infections among High-risk Individuals in Camps and Camp-like Settings (31 March 2020).

Refugee International, COVID-19 and the Displaced: Addressing the Threat of the Novel Coronavirus in Humanitarian Emergencies (30 March 2020).

Freedom United, Refugees subjected to forced labor in Libya now threatened by coronavirus (26 March 2020).

Oleg Bazaluk, Svitlana Balinchenko, Discursive Adjustments Indicators: The Case of Internal Displacement in Ukraine  (12 March 2020).

Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre, Women and Girls in Internal Displacement (5 March 2020).

Justin Mudekereza, A Word of Warning to the World (24 February 2020).

Sonia Elks, Slavery not a crime for almost half the countries in the world – study (12 February 2020).

Human Rights Watch, Deported to Danger: United States Deportation Policies Expose Salvadorans to Death and Abuse (5 February 2020).

Johannes Hoogeveen, Utz Pape, Data Collection in Fragile States: Innovations from Africa and Beyond (February 2020).

Marion Noack, Protracted Displacement in the Horn of Africa (February 2020).

Raymond A. Atugaba, Francis Xavier, Dery Tuokuu, Vitus Gbang, Statelessness in West Africa: An Assessment of Stateless Population and Legal Policy, and Administrative Frameworks in Ghana (31 January 2020).

Lisa Brown Buchanan, Jeremy Hilburn, Cara Ward, Wayne Jounell, Examining Internal Displacement through the Rohingya Crisis (8 January 2020).

International Organization for Migration, World Migration Report 2020 (December 2019).

Svitlana Balinchenko, Conflict-related Democracy Predictors in Ukraine: Tolerance and Participation Tendencies in Migration-affected communities (15 November 2019).

The World Bank Group, Informing Durable Solutions for Internal Displacement in Nigeria, Somali, South Sudan, and Sudan(November 2019).

Krista Rand, Margaret Kurth, Cody H. Fleming, Igor Linkov, A Resilience Matrix Approach for Measuring and Mitigating Disaster-induced Population Displacement (10 September 2019).

Sue Easton, Loretta Lees, Phil Hubbard, Nicholas Tate, Measuring and Mapping Displacement: The Problem of Quantification in the Battle against Gentrification (8 July 2019).

IN THE NEWS

UNHCR Live Blog, Refugees in the COVID-19 Crisis (8 April 2020).

Danish Refugee Council, DRC will remain and continue support to displaced people during COVID-19 crisis (8 April 2020).

Marie McAuliffe and Celine Bauloz, The coronavirus pandemic could be devastating for the world’s migrants 6 April 2020.

The Economist, The world’s refugee camps are on coronavirus disaster in waiting 6 April 2020.

AfricaNews, Coronavirus-Mauritania: Holding the line, border officials mobilise against COVID-19 1 April 2020.

Human Rights Watch, Myanmar: Displacement camps are COVID-19 tinderboxes (30 March 2020).

Ali Al Bayaa, Global displacement, COVID-19 and the risk of a False-positive flattened curve (25 March 2020).

Wendy Williams, COVID-19 and Africa’s Displacement Crisis (25 March 2020).

Tyler Gillett, New Uzbekistan law grants citizenship to nearly 50,000 stateless persons (22 March 2020).

Maysoon Dahab, Keven van Zandvoort, Stefan Flasche, et al., COVID-19 control in low-income settings and displaced populations: What can realistically be done? (20 March 2020).

Soleiman Al-Khalidi, Over 800,000 Syrians, mostly women and children, flee Russian backed offensive: U.N. (13 February 2020).

Zenit, Pope at Angelus calls for halt to human trafficking (9 February 2020).

Helen Davidson, ‘Finally, a life’: Canada comes to the rescue when a refugee family loses hope in Australia (7 February 2020).

Stefanie Glinski, US-Iran tensions fuel Afghan returns (6 February 2020).

Zita Holbourne, Stop the mass deportation flight to Jamaica on 11 February 2020 (4 February 2020).

Ryan Devereaux, Federal judge reverses conviction of border volunteers, challenging government’s “gruesome logic’ (4 February 2020).

Ruth Maclean and Abdi Latif Dahir, New U.S. travel ban shuts door on Africa’s biggest economy, Nigeria (2 February 2020).

Justice for Immigrants, U.S. Bishop Chairmen voice opposition to Proclamation that further restricts immigration and family reunification (2 February 2020).

UNHCR, Nakout, a refugee from South Sudan, pens a letter to her long-lost daughter (23 January 2020).

Damian McIver, Boy with Down syndrome, leukemia likely to go into foster care if Chinese mum is deported (3 June 2019).

SUBSCRIBE // SEND US YOUR NEWS AND EVENTS

Displaced Peoples (CRN11) newsletter is published monthly.  The Newsletter is a venue for sharing information regarding displaced peoples, broadly defined. Your contribution to the monthly newsletter is crucial to its sustenance, success and quality. To contribute to the Newsletter, please contact Veronica Fynn Bruey and Steven Bender: veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org and benders@seattleu.edu. To subscribe or unsubscribe visit CRN 11 Displaced Peoples.