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OCTOBER-DECEMBER NEWSLETTER: VOLUME 3, ISSUE 3, 2021

OCTOBER-DECEMBER NEWSLETTER: VOLUME 3, ISSUE 3, 2021

CRN11_Newsletter_Vol3Iss3_Oct-Dec_2021_Final

WELCOME: LSA 2022

Dear Colleagues:

Welcome to the CRN 11 October-December 2021 Newsletter: Volume 3, Issue 3, the third quarterly issue of 2021. We really hope you and your family are well during this “fourth wave” of the COVID-19 pandemic even as the developing world struggles with access to vaccines while others refuse to be vaccinated.

First and foremost, we are excited to share the Call For Papers for the Law and Society Annual Meeting in Lisbon, Portugal, 13-16 July 2022. The 7th Global Meeting on Law and Society: Rage, Reckoning, & Remedy will be held both in-person and virtually. CRN 11 is inviting you to submit an individual paper online directly via LSA website by 10 November 2021 (remember to click CRN-11 before submitting) OR send your abstract to us by 27 October 2021 to be considered for a CRN-11 panel or roundtable presentation.

Authors interested in doing a New Book in the Field session, please provide us with your name, email address, institutional affiliation, book title, and publication date by 27 October 2021. Additionally, in the LSA Annual Meeting, there is a Call for application for the Graduate Students and Early Career Workshop. LSA will provide flat amounts of USD $750 for participants who travel to the workshop in Lisbon. Submit your application by 17 November 2021.

CRN 11 is committed to advocating for the rights and protection of displaced peoples through this medium. We are seeking a newsletter editor who will commit to producing the quarterly newsletters for 2022. Consider applying and joining us today! Also, we are in the process of finalising a book series contract with Rowman and Littlefield entitled: Migration, Displacement, and Development. Kindly email us for more detail if you are interested in turning your research into a full book.

In closing, we affirm our support for survivors, families, loved ones, and friends of the recent regime change in Afghanistan which has resulted in the forced displacement of many, especially women and children. Last but not the least, join us in congratulating Veronica for being elected president of IASFM 2021-2022 and awarded the ANU International Alumna 2021.

Veronica Fynn Bruey and Steven Bender

DISPLACED PEOPLES’ RIGHTS AND PROTECTION

On 6 October 2021, the UN Human Rights Office (OHCHR) Special Rapporteur on the human rights of migrants, Mr. Felipe González Morales; Special Rapporteur on torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment, Mr. Nils Melzer; and Special Rapporteur on the right to physical and mental health, Ms Tlaleng Mofokeng said Belarus and Poland must work together to keep more migrants from dying on their border as victims of a political dispute. “It is absolutely tragic that six people have already died; not one more person must be allowed to die as a result of this political dispute,” they said. “Belarus reportedly has encouraged refugees and other migrants from as far away as Iraq and Afghanistan to cross its borders into the European Union, while Poland and other EU countries have declared ‘states of emergency’ in an attempt to deny asylum-seekers access to protection in their countries, but now they must work together to save the lives of all those stranded at their common border.” More information is available here.

On 30 September 2021, the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR), the International Organization for Migration (IOM), the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the UN Human Rights Office (OHCHR) called on states to refrain from expelling Haitians without proper assessment of their individual protection needs, to uphold the fundamental human rights of Haitians on the move, and to offer protection mechanisms or other legal stay arrangements for more effective access to regular migration pathways. More information is available here.

On 29 September, a Yemeni humanitarian organization that has provided a lifeline to tens of thousands of people displaced by the country’s conflict is the winner of the 2021 UNHCR Nansen Refugee Award. The Jeel Albena Association for Humanitarian Development, founded in 2017, won the prestigious award for its unwavering support for displaced Yemenis, even as shifting frontlines brought gun battles and explosions to its doorstep. Its founder Ameen Jubran, 37, has himself been displaced by fighting and nearly killed. More information is available here.

On 25 August 2021, the World Food Programme (WFP) reported that one-in-three Afghans, or 14 million people, are hungry today and two million malnourished children urgently need treatment. Meanwhile, since the beginning of the year, conflict and insecurity have driven more than 550,000 Afghans from their homes as some 70,000 displaced people have converged from across the country into the capital, Kabul. Regional Director, John Aylieff pointed out that 14 million people in Afghanistan are struggling to put food on the table. More information is available here.

On 21 June 2021, Bill C-15 (UNDRIP Act) received Royal Assent and was enacted into law. TThe UNDRIP Act is Canada’s first substantive step which provides that the Government of Canada must take all measures necessary to ensure that the laws of Canada are consistent with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and must prepare and implement an action plan to achieve the objectives of the Declaration. More information is available here.

CALLS: CRN-11 EVENTS

Call For Papers: Law and Society 2022 Lisbon, Portugal 

CRN 11 invites you to submit a paper to be considered for a panel, salon, or round-table presentation for the Law and Society Annual Meeting in Lisbon, Portugal, 13-16 July 2022. The 7th Global Meeting on Law and Society: Rage, Reckoning, & Remedy will be held both in-person and virtually. CRN 11 is inviting you to submit an individual paper directly online via LSA website by 10 November 2021 (remember to click CRN-11 before submitting) OR send your abstract to vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca and benders@seattleu.edu by 27 October 2021 to be considered for a CRN-11 panel or roundtable presentation. All abstracts must align with the Law and Society Association abstract guidelines.

New Book in the Field Session
Introduced for the 2016 Annual Meeting, the CRN New Books in the Field Session is an opportunity for CRNs to introduce several new books in one session. Book titles and authors will be listed in the program, as well as the chair/facilitator of the session. Authors interested in doing a New Book in the Field session, email vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca and benders@seattleu.edu with your name, email address, institutional affiliation, book title, and publication date by 27 October 2021.

Graduate Students and Early Career Workshop
“Finding Your Footing, Building Your Standing, & Challenging What’s Expected” LSA is accepting applications for the Graduate Student & Early Career Workshop, in summer 2022. The two-part workshop will convene first in late June, and then on July 12 immediately preceding the Global Meeting on Law & Society in Lisbon, Portugal. Students currently enrolled in graduate/doctoral programs in the social sciences, humanities, and law, as well as early career scholars who received their highest degree after 1 May 2019, including post-doctoral fellows, adjunct faculty, and pre-tenure faculty are welcome to submit their application for the Graduate Students and Early Career Workshop. LSA will provide flat amounts of USD $750 for participants who travel to the workshop in Lisbon. Submit your application by 17 November 2021.

Expression of Interest: Migration, Displacement and Development Book Series

Veronica Fynn Bruey and Steven Bender are in the process of finalising a book series contract with Rowman and Littlefield entitled: Migration, Displacement, and Development. The interdisciplinary series critically examines the obstinacy to expand legal protection to displaced peoples beyond the bona fide refugee within local, regional, and international contexts. Extending protection to a wide range of displaced persons, the series promises to reverse adverse effects on those forced to leave their homes in the name of globalisation by improving the economic, social, and political conditions driving migration in favour of sustaining growth. The series strives for law and policy reform particularly in areas of trade, economy, remittance and aid as well as protecting individual rights to stay home and live a dignified life. If you are interested in turning your research into a full book, email vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca and benders@seattleu.edu.

Call for CRN-11 Newsletter Editor

CRN-11 Newsletter is produced quarterly per annum and must be released on the last day of March, June, September, and December. The Newsletter Editor will be responsible for:

  • Researching and compiling information for the Newsletter,
  • Assisting with the distribution of the Newsletter electronically to subscribers and other social networks,
  • Inviting and showcasing guest blogger written pieces, and
  • Promoting and advertising the Newsletter with the aim of expanding its reach.

To apply, submit a cover letter and CV to vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca  and benders@seattleu.eduApplication Deadline: 30 November 2021

Call For Volunteers: LSA 2022 in Lisbon, Portugal

CRN-11 is in need of volunteers as chairs,  discussants, and notetaker for LSA 2022 conference in Lisbon, Portugal. All interested please email vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca  and benders@seattleu.eduDeadline: 27 October 2021.

Call For Volunteers: Advertisement and Promotion Committee

CRN-11 is also recruiting volunteers to lead the Advertisement and Promotion Committee. To apply, submit a cover letter and CV to vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca  and benders@seattleu.edu. Deadline: 30 November 2021.

Become a CRN-11 Research Collaborator

Interested in being a bona fide research collaborator with CRN-11? To apply, submit a cover letter and CV to vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca  and benders@seattleu.edu. Deadline: Open

Invitation to be a Guest Blogger for CRN-11

Do you have an interesting story to tell about internal and international migration and displacement? CRN 11 is eager to share your piece as a guest blogger in our quarterly newsletter.  Submit your stories to vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca and benders@seattleu.edu. Deadline: Open

Deadly Voyages Book Talk

Veronica Fynn Bruey, Steven Bender, Angel Escamilla Garcia, Niklas Hultin, MichaelAddaney, Tarini Mehta, “Deadly Voyages: Migrant Journeys Across the Globe”, Free Virtual Book Launch hosted by the Refugee Hub, University of Ottawa, Virtual, 25 June 2021, available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tawRlZUSpHc

Veronica Fynn Bruey, “Deadly Voyages: Migrant Journeys Across the Globe”, Free Virtual Book Launch hosted by the World University Service of Canada, World Refugee Day Event, Virtual, 7 June 2021, available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x-ZvS1Uemmg.

Veronica Fynn Bruey, Steven Bender, Chien-yu Liu, “Deadly Voyages: Migrant JourneysAcross the Globe”, Free Virtual Book Launch hosted by the Institute of Social Studies, Erasmus University, Virtual, 12 May 2021, available at: https://eur.cloud.panopto.eu/Panopto/Pages/Viewer.aspx?id=1050ccb8-37b1-46dd-9f0f-ad26011fc2b6.

Veronica Fynn Bruey, Michael Addaney, Maja Grundler, Tarini Mehta, and Franzisca Zanker,“Deadly Voyages: Migrant Journeys Across the Globe”, Free Virtual Book Launch hosted by University of London, Virtual, 21 April 2021, available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZKz434SSIvo

GENERAL CALLS: UPCOMING CONFERENCES

Geographies of Migration in Conflict Settings

What about conflict drives some people to move, while others stay behind? Proposed session for the Annual Meeting of American Geographers 2022, on the geographies of migration during conflict and the dynamics of migration-decision making in conflict settings. The proposed paper session will be submitted for the Annual Meeting of American Geographers 2022   – AAG – to be held in New York, 25 Feb – 1 March. More information is availablehere. Deadline: 10 October 2021

Regional Refugee Settlement Forum, 2021

The Regional Refugee Settlement Forum: Learning from the Past in Australia, Preparing for the Future invites registrations to participate in a forum and roundtable on 12 and 15 October 2021, respectively.  More information is available here.

Whose Move? Addressing Migration and Displacement in the Face of Climate Change, 2021

At this crucial time in global policymaking, the Kaldor Centre Virtual Conference 2021 brings together world experts to share evidence, experience and solutions for people at risk of displacement in the context of climate change and disasters. Whose move? Addressing migration and displacement in the face of climate change will be held in Sydney on 19-21 October 2021. More information is available here.

International Conference on Critical Migration Scholarship

The Masters in Migration Studies Program (MIMS), in conjunction with Jesuit universities, the Jesuit Migration Network, and Global community partners, will host an international virtual conference on Critical Migration Scholarship on November 1 and 2, 2021 at the University of San Francisco, California. More information is available here.

Colloquium on Refugee Sponsorship: Insights and Issues in Comparative Perspective

Colloquium on Refugee Sponsorship: Insights and Issues in Comparative Perspective Innovations in Sponsorship Research Workshop – Nov 2021. The University of Ottawa Refugee Hub and our project partners invite paper or project presentations on research-in- progress and recently published research (~past 12 months) related to refugee sponsorship. The workshop, to be held in November 2021 (date TBC) will feature a series of brief “snapshot” presentations that highlight very recent (and upcoming) developments in the field. For more information, email: eliza.bateman@refugeehub.ca.

Migrant Domestic Workers in Middle East and North Africa, Amman, Jordan, 2022

The ‘Migrant domestic workers in the Middle East and North Africa’ conference is funded by the British Academy and Centre for British Research in the Levant and will be held on 15th February 2022 in Amman, Jordan. The conference will offer a space for critical reflection and exploration on MDW experiences in the region, as well as exploration for how academic work can inform activism and policy change. We invite migrant domestic workers, NGO representatives, academics, practitioners, policymakers, journalists and other stakeholders who engage with these issues to contribute their reflections. More information is available hereDeadline: 10 December 2021.

New Series on Health and Internal Displacement

Although the health of IDPs appears significantly worse than refugees and host communities, research is limited on the health needs of IDPs. This new series by the Journal of Migration and Health on health and internal displacement seeks to increase engagement on the health needs of IDPs and support research, policy and programming responses.  The series focuses specifically on IDP health but is not prescriptive in terms of health conditions, age groups, geographic region, or camp or urban setting, and we hope the series reflects the diversity of IDP populations, contexts and needs. Deadline: 15 December 2021

IASFM ’19, San Paolo, Brazil, 2022

The 19th International Association for the Study of Forced Migration Conference (IASFM19), with the theme, “Global Issues, Regional Approaches – Contexts, Challenges, Dialogues and Solutions”, will be held from August 1-5 August 2022 and hosted online by Universidade Católica de Santos (UniSantos). More information is available here. Deadline: 31 January 2022

Changing Migration, Migration in Change, Berlin, 2022

The 25th International Metropolis Conference Berlin, Changing Migration, Migration in Change, will be held at the Berlin Congress Center in Germany on 4-9 September 2022. Migration is changing. Complex interconnections between technology and digitisation, climate and demographic change, and political unrest are creating a constant state of flux for patterns of, and issues concerning, international migration. The COVID-19 pandemic is an additional challenge. The Conference will consider these challenges. More information is available here. 

RESEARCH, AWARDS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND FELLOWSHIPS

Maria Sibylla Merian Institute for Advance Studies: Individual Fellowships

The Maria Sibylla Merian Institute for Advanced Studies in Africa (MIASA) is dedicated to research in the Humanities and Social Sciences, with ‘Sustainable Governance’ as its central topic. Our main thematic corridors are conflict and sustainable peace, democracy and environmental transformation. We are also interested in a wide range of intersectional sub-topics, such as landownership and acquisition, migration and mobility, restitution of cultural objects, African cities, human rights and other related themes. MIASA is committed to reduce global asymmetries in knowledge production, to promote female scholarship and to bridge cultural divides. The institute offers time and space for supporting innovative academic projects of top international quality. MIASA is offering up to 10 Individual Residential Fellowships for 3-12 months each at the University of Ghana for the academic year 2022/2023. More information is provided here. Deadline: 15 November 2021

Maria Sibylla Merian Institute for Advance Studies: Tandem Residential Fellowships

The Maria Sibylla Merian Institute for Advanced Studies in Africa (MIASA) is dedicated to research in the Humanities and Social Sciences, with ‘Sustainable Governance’ as its central topic. Our main thematic corridors are conflict and sustainable peace, democracy and environmental transformation. We are also interested in a wide range of intersectional sub-topics, such as landownership and acquisition, migration and mobility, restitution of cultural objects, African cities, human rights and other related themes. MIASA is committed to reduce global asymmetries in knowledge production, to promote female scholarship and to bridge cultural divides. The institute offers time and space for supporting innovative academic projects of top international quality. MIASA is offering up to 2 Tandem Residential Fellowships for 3-5 months each at the University of Ghana for the academic year 2022/2023. More information is provided here. Deadline: 15 November 2021

PUBLICATIONS

New Report: ‘2021 Trafficking in Persons Report’
This year’s Trafficking in Persons Report sends a strong message to the world that global crises, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, climate change, and enduring discriminatory policies and practices, have a disproportionate effect on individuals already oppressed by other injustices. Access the full report here.

New Report: ‘Profiles in Resilience: Why Survivors of Domestic Violence and Gang Violence Qualify for International Protection’
Although protection for refugees is a longstanding U.S. legal commitment under federal and international law, immigration policy has become a deeply politicized topic in the United States in recent years. Domestic violence and violence by organized gangs represent a major cause of forced displacement for those arriving at the U.S. border. Yet these forms of persecution are viewed skeptically by some policymakers who favor restricting immigration in spite of U.S. legal obligations to ensure the right to seek asylum. Access the full report here.

New Report: ‘Migrant Workers Abuse in Qatar’s World Cup Luxury Hotel
As kick-off to the FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022 draws closer many national football teams have taken recent stands against racial injustice to highlight the plight of migrant workers in Qatar. As far back as 2019, Liverpool Football Club refused FIFA’s offer to stay in the Masa Malaz Kempinski during the Club World Cup after a Guardian investigation alleged forced labour among subcontracted workers. Access the full report here.

New Report: ‘Migrant Workers’ Rights in Oil Palm Estates in Malaysia’
This report summarizes the findings of an investigation into Malaysian palm oil company IOI Group’s working conditions and a dialogue process with the company. Translated from Finnish report. In the event of interpretation disputes the Finnish text applies. Access the full report here.

New Report: ‘Back to School? Refugee children in Greece denied right to education’
Refugee children in Greece also face dire prospects of receiving a quality education. Even before Covid-19, less than a third of refugee and migrant children were actually enrolled and attending school. The education crisis on the Greek islands is particularly acute. Less than 15% of children in refugee camps attended formal school in the previous year. In the notorious Reception and Identification Centres (RICs), the attendance rate drops to 0.3%, with only seven children out of 2,900 attending class. In this publication, Save the Children and the Greek Council for Refugees call on the Greek Government and European Union to fulfil their clear obligation to enroll and facilitate school attendance of all children living in Greece, regardless of their legal status. Access the full report here.

New Report: ‘Educating Newcomers: K-12 Public Schooling for Undocumented and Asylum-Seeking Children in the United States’
The report specifically aims to help various stakeholders understand the broad range of issues and implications related to population increases in undocumented and asylum-seeking children over the southwest border, including the affordances and challenges of current federal and state immigration policies, numbers of school staff necessary to serve these students, and critical strategies and remaining challenges for supporting these children in U.S. school systems. Access the full report here.

New Report: ‘The Road from Refugee to Resident: How working with displaced people can help create more inclusive and sustainable cities’
About ten years ago, Firas had much to look forward to. A newly qualified lawyer, he and his wife were living among friends and family in the ancient city of Daraa, in southwest Syria. He had ambitions to protect the innocent and provide a good life for his family. The Syrian civil war changed everything. Access the full report here.

New Report: ‘After the Airlift: Protection for Afghan Refugees and Those Who Remain at Risk in Afghanistan’
The scenes at the Kabul airport in recent weeks have been devastating. The airlifts were a race against time to evacuate U.S. citizens, citizens of allied countries, Afghans associated with the United States and allied presence in Afghanistan, and a limited number of Afghan men and women most at-risk under a Taliban rule. The United States and its partners did manage to rescue tens of thousands of people—an essential achievement. However, the airlift must be just the beginning of a sustained effort to ensure protection for Afghans still at-risk, whether seeking safety outside their country’s borders or in need of support within. Access the full report here.

Discussion Paper: ‘International Evacuations of Refugees and Impact on Protection Spaces: Case Study of UNHCR Evacuation Program in Libya’
This essay researches the UNHCR evacuation programme from Libya. The programme has successfully evacuated circa 4,500 persons to safety, yet there are concerns regarding its scalability and impact on protection spaces. Access the paper here.

Discussion Paper: ‘Countering the Politics of Fear – Reframing Threat Narratives about Refugees in Hungary’
The research draws on literature about right-wing populism, the securitisation of migration – including the ‘war on terrorism’ – the impact of securitisation policies and right-wing populist rhetoric on stoking fears among the public, as well as the concepts and assumptions underlying human rights advocacy in challenging the status quo. Access the paper here.

Discussion Paper: ‘Integration to Belonging? Exploring the Trajectory of Integration for Short-term Settled Refugee Women in Berlin’
This paper therefore, has three main aims: first, to provide a case study that prioritises the perspectives of refugee women living in Berlin as experts re their own experiences; second, to fill a research gap in refugee and migrant integration studies through focusing on the first five years of protracted displacement; third, to reassess the trajectory of integration in light of semi-structured interviews with nine refugee women, aged between 19 and 35. Crucially, the paper emphasises the agency of the interviewees in shaping their unique integration process and outcome. Access the paper here.

Journal Article: ‘Migrants and Their Access to the Labour Market in Tanzania: A Feminist Perspective’
The globe is witnessing an increasing feminization of migratory movements, with one estimate putting the share of women higher than it was before. According to International Organization for Migration, by the end of 2019, female migrant workers constituted 40% of all migrant workers in Tanzania. These female migrants are prone to facing a number of challenges in their quest to find work. Access the paper here.

Journal Article: ‘Forced labour and Access to Education of Rohingya Refugee Children in Bangladesh: Beyond a Humanitarian Crisis’
Rohingya refugee children in Bangladesh are forced into labour both inside and outside the camps for a wide range of reasons. This article examines this situation in relation to the access to education for those children living in the camps in Cox’s Bazar. Being informed by several perspectives concerning child labour and access to schooling in developing country contexts, this research work has adopted a qualitative approach to study various factors working behind this pressing issue. Access the paper here.

Journal Article: ‘Hope Springs Eternal: Exploring the Early Settlement Experiences of Highly Educated Eritrean Refugees in the UK’
Millions of people around the world have been forced to flee their homes for socio-economic and political reasons. This paper explores the early settlement experiences of highly educated Eritrean refugees in the UK. It is a phenomenological study informed by narrative interviews with 24 Eritrean refugees who gained a university degree in Eritrea, before migrating to the UK. The participants of this study are what Bauman (1996) calls ‘vagabonds’ who mainly left their country due to the lengthy national service, human rights abuses and/or the political situation of the country. They chose the UK, as their final destination, for its democratic principles and English language. Access the paper here.

Journal Article: ‘The Effects of Inhumane Treatment in North Korean Detention Facilities on the Posttraumatic-Stress Disorder Symptoms of North Korean Refugees’
The study investigated the effects of severe human rights abuses in North Korean on Posttraumatic-stress disorder (PTSD) in North Korean Refugees (NKRs). The study included 300 NKRs (245 females and 55 males) who completed self-report questionnaires that assessed PTSD, experiences of imprisonment, and exposure to inhumane treatment, by authorities in North Korea. Access the paper here.

Journal Article: ‘Between liberal legislation and preventive political practice: Ecuador’s political reactions to Venezuelan forced migration’
The political handling of Venezuelan forced migration in Ecuador has evolved since 2017. This article distinguishes three stages in this evolution. First, from 2017 to mid-2018, Ecuadorian authorities treated Venezuelan entries as those of other South American citizens. Second, from mid-2018 to mid-2019, the Venezuelan exodus was managed as a humanitarian crisis. In the third phase, since mid-2019, authorities imposed restrictive measures, including a mandatory entry visa. Access the paper here.

Journal Article: ‘The Gender-Based Violence and Precarity Nexus: Asylum-Seeking Women in the Eastern Mediterranean’
This paper derives from a larger research on gender-based violence and precarity in the forced migration journeys of asylum-seeking women transiting through the Eastern Mediterranean route and arriving in Greece, in the tumultuous, second decade of the 21st century. In this paper we present the findings from the first phase of the research. Access the paper here.

Journal Article: ‘Conflict, Displacement … and Peace? A Critical Review of Research Debates’
The nexus of violent conflict and forced migration has received continuous scholarly attention since the 1980s, but what are the focus areas and key strands in these research debates? Based on a semi-systematic review of research published between 1980 and 2020, this article examines debates about conflict, displacement, and peace. The review leads to the identification of three main strands that are closely connected: the structural links outlining how conflicts contribute to displacements; the various prevailing risks of violence; and the individual and collective strategies of displaced people to cope with dangers and experiences especially in host countries and regions. Access the paper here.

 New Book: ‘Children of the Camp: The Lives of Somali Youth Raised in Kakuma Refugee Camp, Kenya’
Chronic violence has characterized Somalia for over two decades, forcing nearly two million people to flee. A significant number have settled in camps in neighboring countries, where children were born and raised. Based on in-depth fieldwork, this book explores the experience of Somalis who grew up in Kakuma refugee camp, in Kenya, and are now young adults. This original study carefully considers how young people perceive their living environment and how growing up in exile structures their view of the past and their country of origin, and the future and its possibilities. Access the book here.

New Book: ‘At the Margins of Globalization: Indigenous Peoples and International Economic Law’
Despite the tremendous progress in the development of scientific knowledge, the understanding of the causes of poverty and inequality, and the role of politics and governance in addressing modern challenges, issues such as social inclusion, poverty, marginalization and despair continue to be a reality across the world – and most often impact Indigenous Peoples. At the Margins of Globalization explores how Indigenous Peoples are affected by globalization, and the culture of individual choice without responsibility that it promotes, while addressing what can be done about it. Though international trade and investment agreements are unlikely to go away, the inclusion of Indigenous rights provisions has made a positive difference. This book explains how these provisions operate and how to build from their limited success. Access the book here.

New Book: ‘Design to Live: Everyday Inventions from a Refugee Camp’
The power of art and design to create a life worth living: designs, inventions, and artworks from the Azraq Refugee Camp in Jordan. Access the book here.

New Book: ‘Global Views on Climate Relocation and Social Justice: Navigating Retreat’
This edited volume advances our understanding of climate relocation (or planned retreat), an emerging topic in the fields of climate adaptation and hazard risk, and provides a platform for alternative voices and views on the subject. Access the book here.

New Book: ‘The NGO Moment: The Globalisation of Compassion from Biafra to Live Aid’
This book is a study of compassion as a global project from Biafra to Live Aid. Kevin O’Sullivan explains how and why NGOs became the primary conduits of popular concern for the global poor between the late 1960s and the mid-1980s and shows how this shaped the West’s relationship with the post-colonial world. Access the book here.

New Book: ‘Outsiders: Memories of Migration to and from North Korea’
In this unique and insightful book, Markus Bell explores the hidden histories of the men, women, and children who traveled from Japan to the world’s most secretive state—North Korea. Through vivid ethnographic details and interviews with North Korean escapees, Outsiders: Memories of Migration to and from North Korea reveals the driving forces that propelled thousands of ordinary people to risk it all in Kim Il-Sung’s “Worker’s Paradise”, only to escape back to Japan half a century later. Access the book here.

New Book: ‘Planetary Specters Race, Migration, and Climate Change in the Twenty-First Century’
Neel Ahuja tracks the figure of the climate refugee in public media and policy over the past decade, arguing that journalists, security experts, politicians, and nongovernmental organizations have often oversimplified climate change and obfuscated the processes that drive mass migration. To understand the systemic reasons for displacement, Ahuja argues, it is necessary to reframe climate disaster as interlinked with the history of capitalism and the global politics of race, wherein racist presumptions about agrarian underdevelopment and Indigenous knowledge mask how financial, development, migration, and climate adaptation policies reproduce growing inequalities. Access the book here.

New Book: ‘Revisiting the Nomadic Subject: Women’s Experiences of Travelling Under Conditions of Forced Displacement’
This book follows the stories of forcefully displaced women and raises the question of whether we can still use the figuration of the nomadic subject in feminist theories and politics. This question is examined in the light of the ongoing global crises of mobility and severe border practices. In recounting their stories migrant and refugee women appear in the world as ‘who they are’ — unique and unrepeatable human beings —and not as ‘what they are’ —objectified ‘refugees’, ‘victims’ or ‘stateless subjects’. Access the book here.

New Book: Sa‘udi Policies towards Migrants and Refugees: A Sacred Duty”
A Sacred Duty sets out the Kingdom’s policy toward the global issue of migrants and refugees, with special emphasis directed toward Muslim societies. Discussion focuses on refugee communities currently living in Sa‘udi Arabia, some of which migrated due to war, forced displacement, environmental catastrophe, and economic hardship. Some migrants have come from bordering countries such as Iraq and Yemen; others reached the Arabian Peninsula from Africa and Asia. All have been welcomed and cared for, though settlement conditions, repatriation and deportation circumstances were not always ideal. Access the book here.

New Book: ‘Uncertain Refuge: Sanctuary in the Literature of Medieval England’
To seek sanctuary from persecution by entering a sacred space is an act of desperation, but also a symbolic endeavor: fugitives invoke divine presence to reach a precarious safe haven that imbues their lives with religious, social, or political significance. In medieval England, sanctuary was upheld under both canon and common law, and up to five hundred people sought sanctuary every year. What they found, however, was not so much a static refuge as a temporary respite from further action—confession and exile—or from further violence—jurisdictional conflict, harrying or starvation, a breaching of the sanctuary. Access the book here.

New Book: ‘Unfree: Migrant Domestic Work in Arab States’
A stirring account of the experiences of migrant domestic workers, and what freedom, abuse, and power mean within a vast contract labor system. Access the book here.

New Book: ‘Latin America and Refugee Protection: Regimes, Logics, and Challenges’
Looking at refugee protection in Latin America, this landmark edited collection assesses what the region has achieved in recent years. It analyses Latin America’s main documents in refugee protection, evaluates the particular aspects of different regimes, and reviews their emergence, development and effect, to develop understanding of refugee protection in the region. Drawing from multidisciplinary texts from both leading academics and practitioners, this comprehensive, innovative and highly topical book adopts an analytical framework to understand and improve Latin America’s protection of refugees. Access the book here.

New Book: ‘Invisibility in African Displacements: From Structural Marginalization to Strategies of Avoidance’
African migrants have become increasingly demonised in public debate and political rhetoric. There is much speculation about the incentives and trajectories of Africans on the move, and often these speculations are implicitly or overtly geared towards discouraging and policing their movements. What is rarely understood or scrutinised however, are the intricate ways in which African migrants are marginalised and excluded from public discourse; not only in Europe but in migrant-receiving contexts across the globe. Invisibility in African Displacements offers a series of case studies that explore these dynamics. Access the book here.

New Book: ‘Travelling While Black: Essays Inspired by a Life on the Move’
What does it feel like to move through a world designed to limit and exclude you? What are the joys and pains of holidays for people of colour, when guidebooks are never written with them in mind? How are black lives today impacted by the othering legacy of colonial cultures and policies? What can travel tell us about our sense of self, of home, of belonging and identity? Why has the world order become hostile to human mobility, as old as humanity itself, when more people are on the move than ever? Access the book here.

JOB POSTS

Indigenous Faculty Appointment: University of British Columbia

The Peter A. Allard School of Law at the University of British Columbia seeks to recruit an outstanding Indigenous senior faculty member and invites applications from Indigenous candidates for a full-time tenure-track or tenured appointment, ideally at the rank of Associate or Full Professor. It is expected that the position will commence July 1, 2022, subject to negotiation with the successful candidate. The successful candidate will be appointed to the rank appropriate to their qualifications and experience. The position is also subject to budgetary approval. More information email: appointments@allard.ubc.ca. Deadline: 27 October 2021

Research Fellow: Osnabruck University

Osnabrück University’s Institute for Migration Research and Intercultural Studies (IMIS) is seeking to appoint a Research Fellow (m/f/d) (salary level E 15 TV-L, 100 %) to head the Junior Research Group “The Production of Knowledge about Migration”, sponsored by the Volkswagen Foundation funding initiative “Niedersächsisches Vorab”. The position is to be filled as soon as possible for a period of 3 years. For more information, email imis@uni-osnabrueck.de. Deadline: 31 October 2021

Departmental Lecturer in Forced Migration: University of Oxford

The Oxford Department of International Development seeks to appoint a Departmental Lecturer in Forced Migration. The post is fixed-term for twenty months to cover the research leave of a member of the permanent academic staff. The successful candidate will teach core and optional courses on the MSc in Refugee and Forced Migration Studies and will form part of the core academic teaching staff of the Refugee Studies Centre. More information is available here. Deadline: 11 October 2021

Research Fellow in Law: University of New South Wales

You will be working with an established team on the implementation of the ‘Improving the Regulation of Modern Slavery and Access to Remedy: Learning from Experience’ project within the Australian Human Rights Institute at UNSW. This is an opportunity to conduct independent research, contribute to high quality academic and professional publications and participate in defining the direction of the research. The position is part-time (3 days per week). More information available here. Deadline: 11 October 2021

ANNOUNCEMENTS

International Migration and Refugee Law Moot Court Competition

It is with great pleasure that the Migration Law Research Group from Ghent University is inviting you to the 2022 International Migration and Refugee Law Moot Court Competition. This international competition aims to bring together students interested in international migration and asylum law from around the globe. The moot court competition consists of a written round in October and November 2021 and a two-day oral round on 17 and 18 March 2022 in Ghent, Belgium. More information is available here.

Immigration, Refugee and Citizenship Canada Launches the Canadian Refugee Protection Portal

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) is pleased to announce the launch of the Canadian Refugee Protection Portal (CRPP). Beginning October 6, 2021, persons in Canada wishing to make a claim for refugee protection (with or without the assistance of a representative) can create a secure CRPP account, complete a questionnaire and submit supporting documents, including their completed basis of claim form, online. More information is available here.

Molloy Bursary

The Canadian Immigration Historical Society (CIHS) Board proudly announces the establishment of the CIHS Molloy Bursary for undergraduate students in Canadian universities.  The goal of the Bursary is to provide financial support to students studying Canadian history, especially the history of immigration to this country.  Each year a $1,000 Bursary will be awarded to a deserving student studying in either official language.  We invite newcomers to Canada to apply. More information available here.

Zolberg Institute on Migration and Mobility: Certificate in Migrations Studies

The Zolberg Institute on Migration and Mobility is pleased to announce that the noncredit Certificate in Migration Studies has officially launched. Registration is now open for Forced Migration and Cities, Climate, and Migration. These six-week courses will be delivered via asynchronous video recordings and include a live discussion component. More information is available here.

A New Module on Disasters, Climate Change and Displacement

A New MA Module on Disasters, Climate Change and Displacement will be launched in October 2021 as part of the MA in Refugee Protection and Forced Migration Students at the University of London. The new elective module focuses on human displacement, migration and (im)mobility in the context of disasters, climate change and environmental degradation. More information is available here.

Executive Master in European Law on Migration and Asylum

Organised by the Odysseus Academic Network for Legal Studies on Migration and Asylum in Europe, the aim of the Executive Master in European Law on Migration and Asylum program is to provide its participants with an in-depth understanding of the legal rules on migration and asylum adopted by the European Union and the specialised literature they generate. It will be of interest to all persons who wish to acquire a special knowledge of migration and asylum law, for instance EU or national civil servants, lawyers or judges, workers in NGOs, researchers and PhD students who frequently confront the complex legal dimension of immigration and asylum in their work. More information available here.

The Story of Migration Animation

MIDEQ and PositiveNegatives launched The Story of Migration, an animation in six languages that aims to tell the complex story of the relationship between migration and global inequalities.The animation, illustrated by Karrie Fransman, is based on a script written with MIDEQ’s partners in 11 countries in the Global South and challenges many of the ideas that currently dominate media representations of migration. More information available here.

Ethical Considerations in Research with People in Situations of Forced Migration

The Ethical Considerations in Research with People in Situations of Forced Migration is available here. Your Rights in Research is also available here.

Researching Internal Displacement Launched

Today we launch Researching Internal Displacement as a major new hub for independent analysis. This web platform connects researchers, practitioners, policy- makers, students, artists and people from displacement-affected communities with cutting-edge research, analysis, creative materials and events on internal displacement. We welcome new contributions! More information is available here

IN THE NEWS

Le Devoir: Le combat de Santiago Ávila dans les quartiers chauds du Honduras (2 Octobre 2021)

Joy News: Buduburam Demolition: Residents fail to leave area after deadline to relocate expires (30 September 2021)

Amnesty: Bangladesh: Investigate killing of prominent Rohingya activist Mohib Ullah (29 September 2021)

The Guardian: Indigenous children set to receive billions after judge rejects Trudeau challenges (29 September 2021)

France 24: Six years a slave: Indian farm workers exploited in Italy (11 July 2021)

Cal Matters: Supreme Court decision could mean increase in labor trafficking of farmworkers (9 July 2021)

Freedom United: How Accurate is the 2021 TIP report? (8 July 2021)

CBC: 4 things you should know about Canada’s first Indigenous governor general (6 July 2021)

The Guardian: ‘I want them to feel human again’: the woman who escaped slavery in the UK – and fights to free others (30 June 2021) 

SEND US YOUR NEWS AND EVENTS

Displaced Peoples (CRN11) newsletter is published quarterly.  The newsletter is a venue for sharing information regarding displaced peoples, broadly defined. Your contribution to the newsletter is crucial to its sustenance, success and quality. To contribute to the newsletter, please contact Veronica Fynn Bruey and Steven Bender: vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca and benders@seattleu.edu. To subscribe or unsubscribe, visit CRN 11 Displaced Peoples.

APRIL – JUNE NEWSLETTER: VOLUME 3, ISSUE 2, 2021

APRIL – JUNE NEWSLETTER: VOLUME 3, ISSUE 2, 2021

CRN11_Newsletter_Vol3Iss2_May-Jun 2021_Final

WELCOME

Dear Colleagues:

Welcome to the CRN 11 April-June 2021 Newsletter: Volume 3, Issue 2, the second quarterly issue of 2021, prepared by CRN 11 member and volunteer Dr. Azin Emami. We really hope you and your family are fully vaccinated as the number of cases seems to be declining where vaccines are available, although many countries are still struggling. According to the Director General of the World Health Organisation, Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, “[m]ore than 75% of all vaccines have been administered in just 10 countries”.

Sadly, Liberia, still recovering from 14-years of civil war, is not one of the ten countries where the COVID-19 cases are declining. Having survived the Ebola Virus Disease, Liberia is faced with yet another challenge as the COVID-19 cases rise quickly. According to the Chief Medical Officer Dr. Francis Ketteh, the active confirmed cases in the country include 226 healthcare workers.

As you may know, there is an added vulnerability to being infected by the COVID-19 for displaced peoples including homeless peoples, Indigenous peoples, refugees, and internally displaced peoples (to name a few), hence the need to prioritise access to vaccines. Three of such populations include the children in the Tigray conflict in Ethiopia; Fulani settlers in Nigeria’s pastoralist-Farmers conflict; and students caught up in ongoing attacks by several Boko Haram’s factions in northeastern Nigeria.

In closing, we would like to express our support for survivors, families, loved ones, and friends of Aboriginal people (mostly children) buried in unmarked graves across Canada. Canada’s Residential School system forcibly displaced over 150,000 children in 150 institutions between 1870 and 1996.

In spite of the continuous challenge globally, CRN 11 is committed to advocating for the rights and protection of displaced peoples through this medium. Consider joining us today!

Veronica Fynn Bruey and Steven Bender

DISPLACED PEOPLES’ RIGHTS AND PROTECTION

The ongoing repression of protests in Myanmar could spark a “full-blown conflict” on a par with Syria, the United Nations’ top human rights official warned on 13 April, urging States with influence to take immediate and impactful action to halt the “slaughter” of civilians. More information is available here.

On 28th May, UN humanitarians expressed deep concern on Friday about serious and ongoing abuses carried out against displaced civilians who are also facing dire food insecurity in Ethiopia’s Tigray region, after months of conflict. More information is available here.

On 18 June 2021, UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, is today urging world leaders to step up their efforts to foster peace, stability and cooperation in order to halt and begin reversing nearly a decade-long trend of surging displacement driven by violence and persecution. More information is available here.

On 20 June, to mark World Refugee Day, General António Guterres announced that everyone has a duty to help refugees rebuild their lives after a particularly difficult year for so many. More information is available here.

GENERAL CALLS: CRN 11 EVENTS

Call For Members: Research and Development Committee

CRN 11 is currently recruiting members to join Magdalena Krystyna Butrymowicz who leads the Research and Development Committee. Those interested, please email Magdalena: magdalena.butrymowicz@upjp2.edu.pl. Deadline: Open

Call For Volunteers: Advertisement and Promotion Committee

CRN 11 is currently recruiting volunteers to lead the Advertisement and Promotion Committee. Those interested, please send a cover letter and CV to veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org.

Deadline: Open

Call For Volunteers: Newsletter Editor

Interested in making the best use of your time during COVID-19 lockdown? Apply for the CRN11 newsletter editor position.  Submit a cover letter and CV to veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org  and benders@seattleu.edu. Deadline: Open

Become a CRN 11 Research Collaborator

Interested in being a bona fide research collaborator with CRN 11? Email veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org for details on how to apply. Deadline: Open

Invitation to be a Guest Blogger for CRN 11

Do you have an interesting story to tell about internal and international migration and displacement? CRN 11 is eager to share your piece as a guest blogger for our quarterly newsletter.  Please submit your stories to veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org and benders@seattleu.edu. Deadline:Open

RESEARCH, AWARDS, AND SCHOLARSHIPS

The Comparative Network on Refugee Externalisation (CONREP). Publication Support Prize for Refugees. Deadline: 2 July 2021.

The Comparative Network on Refugee Externalisation (CONREP). The Best Journal Article or Book Chapter Prize. Deadline: 2 July 2021.

The Urban Citizen Fellowship is established by the Municipality of Amsterdam and NIAS-KNAW to stimulate the use of advanced research in political deliberation and public policymaking for the city of Amsterdam. This unique co-sponsored fellowship offers researchers the opportunity to carry out research projects around the concepts of Inclusivity (2020), Democratization and Representation (2021) and Citizenship and Education (2022). Read More.

As part of its Mobility, Temporality and Africa’s Future Politics project, the African Centre for Migration & Society has just completed data collection on 1500+ domestic and international migrants and long term residents in Accra, Johannesburg, and Nairobi. The data explore the trans-local moral and material economies shaping place and politics in these cities’ rapidly transforming neighborhoods. It has generated some of the first data on how COVID has reshaped lives and livelihoods across African cities. Conducted in collaboration with Samuel Hall (Nairobi) and University of Ghana (Accra), the first phase analysis will also involve Columbia University’s Center for Spatial Research. From mid-2022, the data will be widely available for researchers and students.

Applications are invited for a PhD scholarship at the Copenhagen Centre for Social Data Science (SODAS) at the University of Copenhagen as part of the ERC-funded project “DISTRACT: The Political Economy of Attention in Digitized Denmark.” Employment is scheduled to begin November 2021 or as soon as possible thereafter. Read More.

UPCOMING CONFERENCES/CALL FOR PAPERS

Journal of Refugee Studies (JRS) Call for Proposals

The Journal of Refugee Studies (JRS) is accepting proposals for special issues. JRS is a peer-reviewed journal featuring original, high-quality research related to diverse aspects of forced migration. We welcome proposals that engage with and significantly advance scholarly debates in the field of refugee and forced migration studies. For more information on the Journal and its aims, please see here.

Date: 31 August 2021.

Research Consultancy: Refugee-Led Organizations in Asia Pacific

Recruit up to four research consultants, including researchers with ongoing or former experience of forced displacement, to produce pioneering research that helps to better understand the work and contributions of refugee-led organisations in Asia and the Pacific. This research project is funded by Act for Peace and is supported by several key stakeholders in the region, including the Asia Pacific Network of Refugees, the Asia Pacific Refugee Rights Network, and the Kaldor Centre for International Refugee Law at UNSW Sydney. For more details on the roles, see here.

Date: 31 July 2021.

Law and Society Annual Meeting 2021 Radboud Summer school: The Science Behind Migrant Inclusion Policies: Evidence-Based Policies and Policy-Based Evidence

Many migrants in receiving countries are facing disadvantaged living circumstances when compared to natives. In most Western countries, we observe economic inequality, inequality in access to information, healthcare, and housing. Moreover, there are increasing concerns that migrants and the ‘native’ population live separated lives and rarely meet and mingle. When migrant inclusion is hampered, this limits migrants to reach their own full potential. Moreover, the resulting inequalities and the lack of social cohesion can pose a threat to the wellbeing and prosperity of the receiving country as a whole. It is therefore no surprise that to curb the cons of migration and to capitalize on the pros, migrant policy makers and scientists alike strive for a better inclusion of migrants into host societies.

Date: 12 – 16 July 2021
Mode of study: On campus
Fee: € 550 
Scholarship available!

18th IMISCOE Annual Conference

Crossing Borders, Connecting Cultures  will be held 7-9 July 2021 in Luxembourg.

IASFM 18 (Updated)

The International Association for the Study of Forced Migration (IASFM18) Bi-annual conference:
Disrupting Theory, Unsettling Practice: Towards Transformative Forced Migration Scholarship and Policy, will be held 26-28 July 2021 at the University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana.

JOB POSTS

Postdoctoral Associate in Law at the University of Florida, Levin College of Law  

The UF Law Race and Crime Center for Justice (RCCJ) is excited to announce its inaugural Postdoctoral Associate position.  The Center will focus on pressing national issues involving the impact of race on crime and justice. Policing, courts and corrections form the broad expanse of focal points for the Center’s work. As well, laws, criminal-legal policies, theories, and applications offer frameworks for the Center’s focus. The RCCJ will conduct research and produce scholarship with an eye towards policy application. The Postdoctoral Associate will work in collaboration with the Director, UF race scholars, and students, to establish and carry out a robust scholarly agenda.  This position provides a keen opportunity for a junior scholar to focus on critical race and crime issues and identify interdisciplinary and novel policy responses. More information is available here.

Lecturer in Politics and International Studies

Do you have a clear commitment to creating and delivering an excellent student experience in a research-intensive Russell Group university? Are you interested in teaching and scholarship with opportunities for progression and promotion? Do you have a background in Politics, International Studies or a related discipline?

The School of Politics and International Studies (POLIS) is a leading international department for creative and high-quality teaching. As such we intend to make a number of new lectureship appointments of scholars who are committed to pursuing a career specialising in teaching and scholarship. These posts provide the opportunity to teach in an ambitious school focused on challenge-led research and education. They provide in particular the opportunity to teach in a school which is developing curricula to deliver, in alignment with its strategic vision to study and teach the politics of global challenges, a diverse, inclusive, decolonial and digitally informed student experience.

The lectureships will afford successful candidates the opportunity to conduct ongoing scholarship work in areas that may include innovations in blended learning, construction of student placement opportunities and/or the pursuit of pedagogic projects. We are looking to recruit scholars who wish to develop an extended career focused on teaching and scholarship, supported through opportunities for progression and promotion. Crucially we seek candidates who are flexible, pro-active, and capable of providing both students and fellow staff with strong support. Further information is available here.

PUBLICATIONS

New paper: Sustaining the Private Sponsorship of Resettled Refugees in Canada’

Based on an original qualitative study, this paper probes how voluntary sponsorship has been sustained over decades, despite the high personal and financial costs it entails, by analyzing the insights of those who have experienced sponsorship: former refugees who came through the program, long-term sponsors, key informants, and other community leaders. Access the piece here.

New paper: ‘Migrant Smuggling in Africa: Challenges Yet to Be Overcome’

This paper focuses on the plight of the smuggling of migrants in Africa. Migrant smuggling has been documented along at least five major and several more minor routes in Africa. This study investigates whether current legislation and policies are effective in curbing the practice of smuggling in Africa. To evaluate the success rate of these measures, the author compares figures over recent years to establish whether there has been a decrease in the number of migrants smuggled throughout the various regions of the continent. Access the piece here.

New dynamic webpage: IOM

The International Organization for Migration’s (IOM) flagship publication has launched a dynamic new webpage that connects fact-based narratives on migration with interactive data visualizations on some of the latest global migration data and information. It is the first microsite of its kind since the World Migration Report (WMR) series began more than two decades ago. Read more here.

IN THE NEWS

BBC, Ethiopia’s Tigray Conflict: Street Celebrations as Rebels Seize Capital ( 29 June 2021)

UN News, Hospitals Barely Functioning, Famine Still Looming in Ethiopia’s Tigray Region ( 29 June 2021)

The New York Times, Unmarked Graves at Residential Schools in Canada: What We Know (25 June 2021)

The Guardian, Canada Discovers 751 Unmarked Graves at Former Residential Schools (24 June 2021)

Reuters, Northeast Nigeria Insurgency Has Killed Almost 350,000, UN ( 24 June 2021)

Reuters, Boko Haram Militants Kill 8 in Southeastern Niger, Says Defense Ministry ( 30 June 2021)

The Guardian, Migrants Forced to Wait Four Years for Benefits in Australian Budget’s Biggest Cost-Cutting Measure (11 May 2021))

CBS News, Biden’s First 100 Days: How US Immigration Policy Has and Hasn’t Changed (28 April 2021)

AP, Rights Groups Slam Denmark’s ‘Dangerous’ Decision to Return Syrian Refugees (9 April 2021)

Infomigrants, Mediterranean Sea: Charity Says Migrants Stranded in ‘Critical’ State, (3 April 2021)

Arab News, From Ethiopia to Yemen, a Perilous Migrant Route to Endless Misery (3 April 2021)

The New Humanitarian, What’s Behind the UK’s Harsh Post-Brexit Asylum Overhaul? (11 May 2021)

Reuters, Kenya Orders Closure  of Two Refugee Camps, Gives Ultimatum to UN Agency (24 March 2021)

Infomigrants, Syrian Refugees Tortured by Lebanese Security Forces: Amnesty (24 March 2021)

Scientific American, Biden Pushes U.S. and the World to Help Climate Migrants ( 8 February 2021) 

SEND US YOUR NEWS AND EVENTS

Displaced Peoples (CRN11) newsletter is published quarterly.  The newsletter is a venue for sharing information regarding displaced peoples, broadly defined. Your contribution to the newsletter is crucial to its sustenance, success and quality. To contribute to the newsletter, please contact Veronica Fynn Bruey, Steven Bender and Azin Emami: veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org benders@seattleu.edu, aziemami@gmail.com To subscribe or unsubscribe visit CRN 11 Displaced Peoples.