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JUNE/SEPTEMBER NEWSLETTER: VOLUME 6-7, ISSUE 2-3, 2023

JUNE/SEPTEMBER NEWSLETTER: VOLUME 6-7, ISSUE 2-3, 2023

CRN11_Newsletter_Vol4Iss2_09Jun22_FINAL CRN11_Newsletter_Vol6-7Iss2-3_Sep23_Final

WELCOME: LSA 2024, Global Refugee Forum – Australia, Morocco, and Libya

Dear Colleagues:

Welcome to our combined newsletter for June and September 2023.

First and foremost, on 5 September the Law and Society Association (LSA) released the Call for Papers for the Annual Meeting 2024.  Marking the 60th anniversary of LSA under the theme Unsettling Territories: Tradition and Revolution in Law and Society, the annual meeting will be held in Denver, Colorado, USA on 6-9 June 2024.  We invite you to submit an abstract to CRN 11 and consider volunteering for a chair, discussant, or note-taking role. More details are provided on page 3 (CRN-11 Events).

The Global Compact on Refugees (GCR), affirmed by the United Nations General Assembly in 2018, put in place a new comprehensive refugee response model to envision a more sustainable support for refugees. The first Global Refugee Forum took place on 16-18 December 2019. The second Global Refugee Forum will take place on 13-15 December 2023 where progress made by governments and stakeholders on implementation of pledges will be discussed.

On 14 October 2023, Australians will vote on a referendum. The question is whether to approve a proposed law to alter the Constitution to recognise the First Peoples of Australia by establishing an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Voice.

On 8 September 2023, a 6.8 magnitude earthquake hit Morocco. To date some 2,946 people have lost their lives, more than 6,125 are injured; and an estimated 300,000 people are affected. On 10 September 2023, Storm Daniel struck eastern Libya leaving 4,000 dead and 9,000 more still unaccounted for. We reaffirm our support for all those displaced by the war, violent conflict, environmental disaster, climate change, modern day slavery, economic hardship and more.

Veronica Fynn Bruey and Steven Bender

DISPLACED PEOPLES’ RIGHTS AND PROTECTION

According to United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) teams in Sudan’s White Nile state, more than 1,200 refugee children under 5 have died in nine camps in the period between 15 May and 14 September, due to a deadly combination of a suspected measles outbreak and high malnutrition. Across South Sudan, over 5,770 suspected cases of measles have been reported with 142 deaths. In Ethiopia’s Amhara region, as of 12 September, eight people have died from cholera among 435 reported suspected cases. The number of children with malnutrition being admitted to hospitals has increased by 56 per cent across the province of Ouaddai in Chad which is hosting more than 80 per cent of the refugees, since the beginning of the conflict in Sudan. More information available here.

European statelessness conference pushes for concrete action and commitments to resolve statelessness in Europe. The conference, titled “Addressing Statelessness in Europe”, was organized by the European Network on Statelessness (ENS), with Fundación Cepaim and the Universidad Complutense of Madrid; and “aim[ed] to raise awareness about statelessness in Europe, foster meaningful dialogue, and ultimately drive policy changes needed to address the needs and rights of stateless individuals”. The conference in Madrid comes at an opportune moment, in advance of Spain taking up the EU Council Presidency in the second half of 2023. More information available here.

The International Organisation for Migration (IOM) is appealing for governments in Central America and Mexico to collaborate to address the immediate humanitarian needs of people on the move as unprecedented numbers of vulnerable migrants in transit through the region, while also working on long-term solutions to tackle the drivers of migration. “The situation underscores the urgent need for the immediate collective involvement of governments from origin, transit and destination countries to provide humanitarian assistance, especially to vulnerable groups like women and children,” said Michele Klein Solomon, IOM Regional Director for Central America, North America and the Caribbean. More information available here.

On 25 August 2023, the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) warned that one year after historic floods devastated Pakistan and a national state of emergency was declared, millions of children continue to need humanitarian assistance and access to essential services. This season’s monsoon rains are worsening already challenging conditions for flood-affected communities, tragically claiming the lives of 87 children across the country. UNICEF estimates there are still 8 million people, around half of whom are children, that continue to live without access to safe water in flood-affected areas. Over 1.5 million children require lifesaving nutrition interventions in flood-affected districts. More information available here.

An in-depth United Nations (UN) report focused on reparatory justice for people of African descent, published today, urges States to show strong leadership and political will in tackling the lasting consequences of enslavement, the trade in enslaved Africans and colonialism The report to the UN General Assembly, by the UN Secretary-General, sets out a series of concrete steps for States and the international community to address the continued harms suffered by people of African descent – highlighting the intrinsic link between the legacies of colonialism and enslavement and contemporary forms of systemic racism and racial discrimination, intolerance and xenophobia faced by people of African descent. More information available here.

On World Day against Trafficking in Persons 2023, the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC ) and theEuropean Union Anti-Trafficking Coordinator urge States to ‘leave no one behind’. Our message this year is clear – ‘reach every victim of trafficking, leave no one behind’,” said John Brandolino, UNODC Director of the Division for Treaty Affairs. “The European Union is a key partner for UNODC and together we strive to strengthen global anti-trafficking responses.” UNODC, with the support of the EU, delivers legal and technical expertise to crime prevention and criminal justice agencies and victim support organizations in several regions of the world, especially in low-income countries. More information available here.

The Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre (IDMC) reports that the February earthquakes in Türkiye triggered more than 677,000 internal displacements in neighbouring Syria, the largest disaster displacement event recorded for the country since data became available in 2014. Idlib and Aleppo governorates, which between them were hosting almost half of the 6.8 million IDPs by the country’s conflict as of May 2022, were hardest hit. The quakes heightened the vulnerabilities of many IDPs who are forced to move each winter as snowstorms and floods hit their shelters. More information available here.

CRN-11 EVENTS AND ACTIVITIES

Presentation: Transnational Indigeneity in Canada – Beyond s35

How can settler law be reimagined to recognise all Indigenous Peoples, especially those that are displaced? This research draws on theories of decolonisation/decoloniality, critical race theory, Indigenous Studies, (Black African) feminist jurisprudence, and an emerging conceptual framework – critical migrant-displaced theory, to examine section 35(2) of the Canadian Constitution. This is a free virtual event hosted presented by Veronica Fynn Bruey and hosted by Athabasca University Research Unit on 4 October 2023 at 10:00 AM (Mountain Time). To join, click here.

Call for Papers: Law and Society 2024 Denver, Colorado, USA

CRN 11 invites you to submit a paper to be considered for a panel, salon, round-table presentation, or new book in the field for the Law and Society Annual Meeting in Denver, Colorado, USA, 6-9 June 2024. This year’s annual meeting marks the 6oth anniversary of LSA and returns to Denver, the site of the Association’s first summer institute on social science methods in legal education. The theme for this year’s in-person annual meeting is Unsettling Territories: Tradition and Revolution in Law and Society. CRN 11 is inviting you to submit an individual paper directly online via LSA website by 24 October 2023 (remember to select CRN-11 before submitting) OR send your abstract to vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca and benders@seattleu.edu by 20 October 2023 to be considered for a CRN-11 panel, roundtable, New Books in the Field or Author Meets Reader session.  All abstracts must align with the Law and Society Association abstract guidelines.

Presentation: Indigeneity, Displacement, and Patriarchy

In Canada, indigeneity is embedded and localized in section 35 of the colonial settler Constitution Act, 1867-1982. Adopting a complex mixed methodological design, the research draws on decolonisation, intersectionality, critical race, social determinants of health, and (Black African) feminist jurisprudence, this roundtable discussion examines geographical limitations of Aboriginality and the erasure of the multiplicities of displace transnational (African) Indigenous Peoples. This paper will be presented by Veronica Fynn Bruey during the 6th Metropolis Identities Summit on 1-3 November 2023. To register, click here.

Presentation: Settler Law and Displaced Transnational Indigenous Peoples in Canada

Documenting and validating Indigenous Peoples collective experiences with colonial violence, land dispossession, forced displacement, systemic racism, and ongoing exclusion from the nation-building process is fundamental to the idealised Westphalian state such as Canada’s constitutional monarchy. Using a complex mixed methodological design, this research project examines how law normalises discrimination and inequalities by claiming equal rights yet differential treatment for transnational Indigenous migrants in Canada. This paper will be presented by Veronica Fynn Bruey during the Decolonization and Development for Africa and People of African Descent Conference on 2-4 November 2023 hosted by the University of Dayton School of Law. To register, click here.

Presentation: Who is an Indigenous Person?

How can settler law be reimagined to recognise all Indigenous Peoples especially those that are displaced? This research draws on theories of decolonisation/decoloniality, critical race theory, Indigenous Studies, (Black African) feminist jurisprudence, and an emerging conceptual framework – critical migrant-displaced theory, to examine section 35(2) of the Canadian Constitution. This paper will be presented by Veronica Fynn Bruey on 11 November 2023 during the 12th Annual Decolonizing Conference hosted by the Centre for Integrative Anti-Racism Studies at the University of Toronto. To register, click here.

Presentation: Lived Experience of Displacement

Veronica Fynn Bruey was invited to share her work and story of displacement during the Center for Migration Studies Annual Gala on 14 November 2023 in New York.  To register, click here.

Call for Book Proposal: Migration, Displacement and Development

The Migration, Displacement, and Development book series with Rowman and Littlefield is an interdisciplinary series that critically examines the obstinacy to expand legal protection to displaced peoples beyond the bona fide refugee within local, regional, and international contexts. Extending protection to a wide range of displaced persons, the series promises to address adverse effects on those forced to leave their homes in the name of globalization by improving the economic, social, and political conditions driving migration in favour of sustaining growth. The series strives for law and policy reform particularly in areas of trade, economy, remittance and aid as well as protecting individual rights to stay home and live a dignified life. If you are interested in turning your research into a full book visit the MDD Book Series website or  email vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca and benders@seattleu.edu.

Call for Editors and Reviewers: Journal of Internal Displacement

The Journal of Internal Displacement is accepting applications for editorial board membership and reviewers. All interested should email: internaldisplacement@gmail.com. Deadline: Open

Call For Volunteers: LSA 2024 in Denver, Colorado, United States

CRN-11 is in need of volunteers as chairs, discussant and notetakers during LSA 2024 in Denver, Colorado, United States. All interested please email vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca  and benders@seattleu.edu.

Deadline: 29 February 2024.

Call For Newsletter Editors

CRN-11 Newsletter is produced quarterly per annum and must be released by the last day of March, June, September, and December. The Newsletter Editor will be responsible for:

  • Researching and compiling information for the Newsletter,
  • Assisting with the distribution of the Newsletter electronically to subscribers and other social networks,
  • Inviting and showcasing guest blogger written pieces, and
  • Promoting and advertising the Newsletter with the aim of expanding its reach.

To apply, submit a cover letter and CV to vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca  and benders@seattleu.edu.

Deadline: Open

Call For Advertisement and Promotion Committee

CRN-11 is recruiting volunteers to lead the Advertisement and Promotion Committee. To apply, submit a cover letter and CV to vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca  and benders@seattleu.edu. Deadline: Open

Become a CRN-11 Research Collaborator

Interested in being a bona fide research collaborator with CRN-11? To apply, submit a cover letter and CV to vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca  and benders@seattleu.edu. Deadline: Open

Invitation to be a Guest Blogger for CRN-11

Do you have an interesting story to tell about internal and international migration and displacement? CRN 11 is eager to share your piece as a guest blogger in our quarterly newsletter.  Submit your stories to vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca and benders@seattleu.edu. Deadline: Open 

GENERAL CALLS: UPCOMING EVENTS

Right to Asylum

The Zolberg Institute on Migration and Mobility is pleased to host a series of events commemorating the 75th anniversary of the signing of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights on 13 October 2023. The day will feature a panel on the current situation regarding asylum seekers and migrants, a panel on the future of the asylum system, and a film screening on the new documentary Adrift. The evening will conclude with an address and Q&A session with the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, Volker Turk. More information available here.

APAD Panel: Call for Proposal

The next colloquium of the Association for the anthropology of social change and development (APAD), entitled “Au prisme du travail: capitalisme, développement et changement social dans le Sud global”, to be held 22-24 May 2024 in Liège (Belgium). We are proposing panel that focuses on Migrant Work in the Age of Capitalism: insertions, daily life and Professional sociability and that will lead to publication.
Proposals are due by 15 November 2023 on the APAD website by clicking here.

Call for Papers: Internal Displacement and Solutions

This online conference marks the culmination of five years of increasing international engagement with the pressing challenge of ‘solutions’ to internal displacement. This conference provides a forum for researchers, practitioners, policy-makers and students from all disciplines to come together to present, debate and reflect on ‘solutions’ to internal displacement and their future. It offers the chance to develop new research agendas and collaborations. Organised by the University of London, the conference will be held on 14-15 March 2024. More information available here. Deadline: 17 November 2023 on the APAD website by clicking here.

Kaldor Centre Conference 2023

“Learning from the future: Foresight for the next decade of forced migration” on 20 November 2023; an in-person conference held at the Clancy Auditorium, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. As the Kaldor Centre embarks on its 10th anniversary, our flagship conference will harness strategic foresight to inform the agenda for the decade to come. To register click here.

Call for Papers: Inclusive Education, and Forced Migration, and Justice

For too many children forcefully displaced from the places that were once their homes, the way societies can marginalise and exclude is a lived reality—a reality that brings urgency to research that illuminates both exclusion in society and concrete possibilities for the creation of inclusive and safe learning communities where all displaced children might belong and flourish. It is precisely this reality that inspires this Special Issue. We welcome original research articles, theoretical scholarship, and reviews. More information available here. Deadline: 15 March 2024

2024 IMISCOE Spring Conference

The MiReKoc 2024 IMISCOE Spring Conference will take place at Koç University, known for its unwavering commitment to academic excellence and cutting-edge research. From April 17-19, 2024, our gathering will bring together distinguished academics, policymakers, and practitioners from around the globe, providing an enriching opportunity for cross-disciplinary dialogue and collaborative knowledge exchange. Register here.

Petition: Support to Help Iranian Men who Performed Mandatory Military Service

A petition affirming support of Sen Durbin’s efforts in helping Iranian descent men who performed mandatory military service. More information available here.

RESEARCH, AWARDS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND FELLOWSHIPS

PhD Opportunity: Refugee Rights Project

Associate Professor Kate Ogg has been awarded an Australian Research Council grant to undertake a project on strategic human rights litigation. The project includes a PhD position for a student from a refugee background. The PhD project will examine the conduct and impact of strategic refugee rights litigation from the perspective of refugee communities. This includes how refugees are depicted in litigation and accompanying media and political campaigns as well as how refugee communities can and should be involved in legal campaigns addressing refugee rights. The PhD candidate will receive an ANU PhD scholarship and $9,500 from the ANU College of Law for fieldwork and travel over the course of the PhD. Apply here. For more information contact kate.ogg@anu.edu.au. Deadline: 30 October 2023.

CERES Programme for 2023-2024

CERES is currently offering nine courses in the 2023-2024 academic year (one offered twice). This has been in response to demand from many PhD researchers and member institutions for more PhD-level teaching tailored to Development Studies, which is the comparative advantage of CERES and where it adds value to its members. More information is available here.

Georgetown MA in International Migration and Refugees

This cutting-edge program addresses the pressing challenges arising from population movements
and prepares a new generation of professionals to navigate the intricate intersections of migration, displacement and policy-making. With migration shaping diverse industries and societies worldwide, this immersive program, offered by Georgetown’s Institute for the Study of International Migration (ISIM), equips students with the expertise needed to understand, respond to and positively impact the lives of those on the move. More information available here.

Scholarships and Fellowships in Migration Studies

ARMACAD database is a rich resource for those looking for academic and professional programs and events in the field of migration studies and other related areas. More information is available here. Deadline: varied

Coming Soon: XIV Global Forum on Migration and Development Summit

On The Global Forum on Migration and Development will be hosting the fourth Migration Youth Forum in Geneva and online as the official preparatory space for youth to consolidate and exchange priorities, recommendations, youth-led solutions and best practices. Our main bid is to deliver on a strong, inspirational and substantive youth presence at the 14th GFMD Summit (23-25 January 2024). All youth forum participants will form the GFMD Summit delegation. The Youth Forum will be held on the 21st of January 2024, two days prior to the beginning of the GFMD Summit. More information is provided here. 

JOB POSTS

Assistant Professor of Media, Culture and Law (Black, Indigenous, Migrant Focus)

The Department of Communication (https://communication.ucsd.edu/) at UC San Diego seeks faculty candidates at the level of Assistant Professor whose research, teaching, and service will advance scholarship and institutional solutions for designing more just and equitable systems and structures. We seek an interdisciplinary scholar, artist, or practitioner who engages with the study and design of laws and policies related to media, communication, and culture with a focus on Native American/Alaska Native/Pacific Islander, Indigenous, Black, and/or migrant futures. More information is available here. Deadline: 13 October 2023.

PUBLICATIONS

New Report: Socio-spatial Initiatives to Foster Belonging Among Refugee Families Resettled in Canada: A Narrative Review and Future Directions

Displacement and resettlement can be a destabilizing experience for refugee families, exacerbating feelings of isolation and detachment. Refugee families arrive in the receiving country after facing a variety of challenges ranging from traumatic stress reactions related to living in a war-affected context to stress during displacement journeys. Displacement and resettlement in an unfamiliar place far from their country of origin has important impacts on virtually every aspect of families’ socio-spatial environments including cultural norms, religious traditions, and support networks. Access the report here.

New Report: UNHCR Global Trends 2023

The latest Global Trends report, published in June 2023, provides key statistical trends on forced displacement. It includes the latest official statistics on refugees, asylum-seekers, internally displaced and stateless people, as well as the number of refugees who have returned home. Access the report here.

New Report: Global Report on Internal Displacement 2023

IDMC’s Global Report on Internal Displacement (GRID) is the world’s leading source of data and analysis on internal displacement. This year’s edition includes a special focus on the complex relationships between disasters, conflict and violence, food security and internal displacement. Access the report here.

New Report: Migrants, Refugees and Societies

World Development Report 2023 proposes an integrated framework to maximize the development impacts of cross-border movements on both destination and origin countries and on migrants and refugees themselves. The framework it offers, drawn from labor economics and international law, rests on a “match and motive” matrix that focuses on two factors: how closely migrants’ skills and attributes match the needs of destination countries and what motives underlie their movements. This approach enables policy makers to distinguish between different types of movements and to design migration policies for each. International cooperation will be critical to the effective management of migration. Access the report here.

New Report: Closing the Implementation Gap – Federalism and Respect for International Human Rights in Canada

Canada has long enjoyed an international reputation for having a stellar human rights record. Looking closer at Canada’s domestic record of human rights implementation presents a murkier picture of a country that is often reluctant to incorporate international human rights treaties and recommendations at home. This study sets out a comprehensive agenda for advancing reforms, to help shape the work of the forum and address the implementation gap. Access the report here.

Journal Article: ‘Testimony on the move: Navigating the borders of (In)visibility with migrant -led soundwalks’

With the Rome-based soundwalk initiative “Invisible Guides,” migrant narrators lead neighborhood tours, recounting Roman history while bearing witness to their own experiences. This essay discusses the potential for these testimonial transactions between authors, participants, and urban space to challenge the invisibilization of migrant realities within the city center. More information available here.

Journal Article: ‘Factors supporting settlement among Syrian refugee women: A longitudinal participatory action research study’

 Over 13 million Syrians have been forcibly displaced since the start of the Syrian civil war in 2011. In response to this humanitarian crisis, several high-income countries have settled thousands of Syrian refugees. In Canada, over 50,000 Syrian refugees have resettled through varying resettlement programs. Half of the refugees are women who are mothers or of child-bearing age, and who experience numerous health disparities. This article reports findings from a larger, Canadian-based study inquiring into the factors supporting and shaping the settlement and integration experiences among women who are Syrian refugees and mothering. More information available here.

Journal Article: ‘Participation of refugees and internally displaced persons (IDPs) in research: guidance for researchers from researchers’

This guide is for researchers (including humanitarian practitioners) who are seeking guidance on how to promote the participation of refugees and internally displaced persons (IDPs) within the research process. It is based on a qualitative study exploring how humanitarian practitioners and academics operationalise participation in their research with these populations, with a particular focus on experiences conducting research on gender equality and gender-based violence (GBV). More information available here.

Journal Article: ‘Living on the margins – The socio-spatial representation of urban internally displaced persons in Ethiopia’

Based on multi-sited ethnographic research in Kersa and Sululta IDP settlements of Ethiopia, this study reveals how IDPs experience similar spatial, social and symbolic marginality in different urban contexts. Our findings show the relational manifestation of segregation, social distance and stigmatization that impede IDPs’ access to urban space and services. This study also highlights how these dimensions of marginality interact and reproduce an additional layer of marginality. Our research suggests the need for inclusive urban governance in which IDPs contribute to and benefit from urbanization as citizens. More information available here.

Journal Article: ‘Blogosphere, vulnerability news and users’ engagement: The contribution of blogs in the reporting of internally displaced persons in Nigeria’

This study examines blog coverage (October 2018 to October 2019) and its engagement with citizens regarding internally displaced persons in Nigeria. Approximately 85 stories of internally displaced persons were covered on Naija.com. This study found a significant difference in the appearance of internally displaced persons’ stories on the blog, appearance of the stories in the headline, length of stories used in describing internally displaced persons and the tone used. More information available here.

Journal Article: ‘Untreated dental caries among Libyan children during and after the war and in internally displaced person camps’

The present study assessed whether living in a conflict zone and in internally displaced person (IDP) camps were associated with the number of untreated caries in primary, permanent and all teeth in Libyan children and whether these associations differed by parents’ educational attainment. More information available here.

Journal Article: ‘Evaluation of conditional cash transfers and mHealth audio messaging in reduction of risk factors for childhood malnutrition in internally displaced persons camps in Somalia’

A 2 × 2 factorial cluster-randomised trial was implemented in camps for internally displaced people (IDP) near Mogadishu, Somalia, starting in January 2019. The main study outcomes were assessed at midline and endline and included coverage of measles vaccination and the pentavalent immunisation series, timely vaccination, caregiver’s health knowledge, and child diet diversity. Twenty-three clusters (camps) were randomised to receive or not receive conditional cash transfers (CCTs) and an mHealth intervention, and 1,430 households were followed up over 9 months. All camps received cash transfers made at emergency humanitarian level (US$70/household/month) for 3 months followed by a further 6 months at a safety net level (US$35). More information available here.

Journal Article: ‘Climate Change, Migration, and Pandemics’

The 1951 Refugee Convention defines a refugee as someone with a “well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion.” Environmental refugees do not fall within its scope, nor does international human rights law adequately cover these migrants. The paper argues that if we do not modify international law in order to deal with the inevitable human migrations spurred by climate change and its accompanying pandemics then suffering, strife, and violence will be the unavoidable outcome. More information available here.

New Book: The Immigration Law Death Penalty

In immigration courts across America, a non-citizen convicted of an “aggravated felony” will almost certainly face deportation with no access to asylum. However, despite the ominous-sounding name, aggravated felonies need not be either “aggravated” or “felonies.” The term encompasses more than thirty offenses, ranging from check fraud and shoplifting to filing a false tax return. The recent expansion in the list of such offenses has resulted in astronomical rates of deportation. More information available here.

New Book: Migrant Protest and Democratic States of Exception

This book examines two types of migrant protest occurring in a sovereign context: faith-based sanctuary and self-harming protests of migrant detainees in US and Australian detention centers. Migrant protests create “democratic states of exception” as they exercise forms of counter-sovereignty. They offer a model of post-national politics aligned with human rights, exploding the primacy of the nation-state in understanding rights. More information available here.

New Book: Algerian Women Women and Disaporic Experience

This book uses the narratives of women who fled Algeria in the 1990s—known as the ‘Black Decade’—to offer a more intimate understanding of the violence women face in times of conflict. More information available here.

New Book: Trafficking in Antiblackness

In Trafficking in Antiblackness Lyndsey P. Beutin analyzes how campaigns to end human trafficking—often described as “modern-day slavery”—invoke the memory of transatlantic slavery to support positions ultimately grounded in antiblackness. Drawing on contemporary antitrafficking visual culture and media discourse, she shows how a constellation of media, philanthropic, NGO, and government actors invested in ending human trafficking repurpose the history of transatlantic slavery and abolition in ways that undermine contemporary struggles for racial justice and slavery reparations. More information available here. 

New Book: Asylum and Extraction in the Republic of Nauru

Asylum and Extraction in the Republic of Nauru provides an extraordinary glimpse into the remote and difficult-to-access island of Nauru, exploring the realities of Nauru’s offshore asylum arrangement and its impact on islanders, workforces, and migrant populations. More information available here.

New Book: Refugees – Towards a Politics of Responsibility

Nathan Bell argues for nothing less than a new concept of the political: that societies (liberal or not, in the mode of the sovereign state or some other form) embrace an ethos of responsibility for others, where the right to seek asylum becomes foundational for politics itself. Such a proposal is at the antipodes of Schmitt’s friend-enemy distinction, such that hospitality and not hostility forms the basis of political decision-making. More information available here.

New Book: Escape from Manus Prison

The awe-inspiring story of the only person to successfully escape Australia’s notorious offshore detention centre–and his long search for freedom. In 2013 Jaivet Ealom fled Myanmar’s brutal regime, where Rohingya like him were being persecuted and killed, and boarded a boat of asylum seekers bound for Australia. Instead of finding refuge, he was transported to Australia’s infamous Manus Regional Processing Centre. More information available here.

New Book: Displacement Governance and the Illusion of Integration

There is a poetic convergence between the struggles of people on the move and people in the peripheries of power, as they may collectively envision alternative forms of coexistence and fight together for fundamental rights and a dignified life. The emergence of fresh perspectives on solidarity from local communities across the board can become the driving force behind a transformative movement of the people. Examples of small yet impactful acts of solidarity in the northern Mediterranean region illustrate how migration fuels social change, leading to the alteration of established norms. These examples further challenge the dominant populist narrative of migration, and integration into mainstream society as the only viable solution. More information available here.

New Book: Beyond Homelessness

In Beyond Homelessness, Steven Bouma-Prediger and Brian Walsh explore the relationship between socioeconomic, ecological, and cultural homelessness. Bouma-Prediger and Walsh blend groundbreaking scholarship with stirring biblical meditations, while enriching their discussion with literature, music, and art. Offering practical solutions and a hope-filled vision of home, they show how to heal the deep dislocations in our society. More information available here.

New Book: Narrative Inquiry of Displacement

Narrative Inquiry of Displacement: Stories of Challenges, Change and Resilience describes a variety of displacement experiences in different cultures and contexts. The text uses narrative methodologies to share participant stories and explore the nature and effects of displacement. Each chapter examines and theorises the narrative approach used to show the link between the data collection and the story, illustrating research decisions and analysis in action. The book presents a range of displacement stories, including migration, immigration, social and political displacement. More information available here.

New Book Chapter: ‘The Enduring Impacts of Slavery: A Historical Perspective on South-South Migration’

Applying the “Global South” as a critical concept, this chapter examines the lasting impacts of the transatlantic enslavement of Black African peoples as a precursor of contemporary forms of South-South migration and associated responses, representation, and challenges. Arguing that much South-South migration is rooted in historical antecedents, the chapter also highlights the contemporary consequences of slavery for Liberia, where the return of captured and emancipated slaves led directly to the civil wars that devastated the country between 1989 and 2003, leading to significant displacement into other parts of West Africa. More information available here.

Policy Brief: Green Reintegration: Supporting Returning Migrants in Climate-Affected Communities

Climate change is affecting countries around the world, but some of its most intense impacts occur in low- and middle-income countries that have limited resources to prepare and adapt. Many of these countries also welcome back significant numbers of returned migrants. Those returning to areas where climate events and environmental degradation are negatively affecting livelihoods, the supply of safe housing, and community dynamics can find it difficult to re-establish themselves, facing challenges even beyond those typically experienced by returnees.  Access the brief here.

Policy Brief: Displacement at COP 22

Climate change is the defining challenge of our times: a challenge which interacts with and reinforces the other global megatrends such as population growth, urbanization, and growing food, water and energy insecurity. It
is a challenge which is adding to the scale and complexity of human displacement; and a challenge that has important implications for the maintenance of international peace and security. Access the brief here.

Policy Brief: Indigenous Peoples and Displacement

This paper is intended to improve the understanding of the unique risks, challenges and impacts indigenous peoples face in displacement and highlight how these communities can help achieve durable solutions. It also explains why better data on displaced indigenous peoples is essential to more inclusive responses. Access the brief here. 

Blog Post: Too Many Nerds in the Room

Sitting in our assortment of chairs, enjoying the relief of the air conditioning, with the buzz from a second breakout group on the other side of the room, our group of African and European migration researchers quickly settled into an intense conversation. On the small stage of the lecture room at International House, University of Ghana, we kept coming back to one central question: what is a theory? Relatedly, who makes theories, what can they explain, and who listens to them? The second major topic we decided to tackle was on terminologies in forced migration. Access the post here.

Blog Post: Will Asylum-seekers and Refugees in Rwanda be Mistreated?

Recently, the United Kingdom (UK) has chosen to send certain asylum-seekers to Rwanda, thereby creating the impression that they are unwelcome in its territory. A lot has been written on this topic, particularly focusing on the UK’s position and its possible violations of Refugee Law, Human Rights Law, and Anti-Trafficking Law. Access the post here.

Blog Post: Making “Makala”: A Response to the IDP Crisis in the Congo?

Since the resumption of hostilities between the M23 rebels and the loyalist forces of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), IDPs have faced economic crisis and food insecurity in eastern Congo. This has produced damaging environmental effects. Access the post here.

Magazine Article: Effects of land dispossession and forced migration on Indigenous peoples in North America

To date, we lack precise estimates of the extent to which Indigenous peoples in parts of North America were dispossessed of their lands and forced to migrate by colonial settlers, as well as how the lands that they were moved into compare to their original lands. Farrell et al. constructed a new dataset within the boundaries of the current-day United States and found that Indigenous land density and spread in has been reduced by nearly 99% (see the Perspective by Fixico). The lands to which they were forcibly migrated are more vulnerable to climate change and contain fewer resources. Research and policy implications of these findings are discussed. Access the article here.

YouTube: World Development Report 2023: Forced Displacement

The Center for Global Development, Refugees International, and the World Bank Group invite you to join us for a series of panels to launch the World Development Report 2023: Migrants, Refugees, & Societies at the Birdsall Conference Center. Access the podcast here.

Podcast: World of Migration

This podcast, launched in connection with MPI’s 20th Anniversary, explores these and other issues with top thinkers in the field, from MPI and beyond. Access the podcast here.

Podcast: You Have Been Told a Lie

The Tamil asylum seeker family from Biloela — you may think you know their whole story, but You Have Been Told A Lie. Access the podcast here.

Podcast: Borders and Belonging

What’s the difference between human smuggling and human trafficking? Did migration myths drive the 2016 Brexit vote? Do border walls stop migration? Access the podcast here.

Documentary Film: Displaced

Displaced is a heartbreaking story about the Kovalchuk family, who were among the first refugees to arrive in America after fleeing Ukraine at the start of the Russian invasion. The film follows three generations of the close-knit family through their first days and weeks in Southern California after traveling through six countries and two continents. More information available here.

Documentary Film: Who You Were Yesterday

Who You Were Yesterday follows the incredible journey of four young people as they uproot their lives and move from Dzaleka Refugee Camp in Malawi to Canada to pursue their post-secondary education. More information available here.

IN THE NEWS

City News, Indigenous women further endangered by East Hastings forced displacement: women’s groups (11 April 2023)

Toronto Star, Why do Roma living in Europe flee to Canada? Is life that bad there? (16 April 2023)

Migration + Tech Monitor, Fellowship Awardees (20 April 2023)

Reliefweb, Living with climate change, conflict and displacement (25 April 2023)

Toronto Star, Late-night texts, secret jobs, constant fear: Inside an undocumented worker’s life in the shadows and a new federal program that could change her life (23 May 2023).

Al Jazeera, Record 110 million people worldwide displaced: UN refugee agency (14 June 2023)

Boston Globe, Titan rescue efforts raise questions about whether migrants’ lives are also worth saving (23 June 2023)

New York Times, Canada Is Ravaged by Fire. No One Has Paid More Dearly Than Indigenous People (29 July 2023)

The Guardian, More than 1m acres of Indigenous land flooded by dams, new study finds (29 August 2023)

IOM, US-Mexico border world’s deadliest migration land route (12 September 2023)

The Conversation, Multiculturalism has failed, says Braverman in refugee speech (26 September 2023)

Africa News, Floods in eastern Libya displaced over 16,000 children – UNICEF (28 September 2023)

SEND US YOUR NEWS AND EVENTS

Displaced Peoples (CRN11) newsletter is published quarterly.  The newsletter is a venue for sharing information regarding displaced peoples, broadly defined. Your contribution to the newsletter is crucial to its sustenance, success and quality. To contribute to the newsletter, please contact Veronica Fynn Bruey and Steven Bender: vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca and benders@seattleu.edu. To subscribe or unsubscribe, visit CRN 11 Displaced Peoples.

MARCH NEWSLETTER: VOLUME 5, ISSUE 1, 2023

MARCH NEWSLETTER: VOLUME 5, ISSUE 1, 2023

CRN11_Newsletter_Vol5Iss1_27Mar23_FINAL

WELCOME: Law and Society Annual Meeting 2023

Dear Colleagues:
Happy belated new year!

Welcome to our first quarterly newsletter of the year: Volume 5, Issue 1. This issue is overdue because of challenges we have had with filling the Newsletter Editor role. We invite you to consider volunteering to assist with producing the quarterly newsletter, advertising/promoting our activities, reviewing/editing the Journal of Internal Displacement, discussing/taking notes during the Law and Society Annual Meeting 2023 in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Have you ever wondered why securitization and protection of refugees dominate international (forced) migration discourse while settler colonial forced displacement of Indigenous Peoples and trans-Atlantic human cargo business are missing from law, policy, and advocacy on migration and development? If your work is focused in this subject area, consider submitting a book proposal to the Migration, Development and Displacement Book Series.

The impact of climate change and natural disaster is worsening each day. From Ecuador landslide; to food security threats in Kenya; Kiribati, Samoa, Solomon Islands, and Tonga vulnerability to natural disasters; and the mass displacement/extinction of wildlife, the story is bleak. Let’s continue to be intentional in our resolve to minimise displacement in all shapes and forms.

We would like to reaffirm our support for all those displaced by the war, violent conflict, environmental disaster, climate change, modern day slavery, economic hardship and more.

Veronica Fynn Bruey and Steven Bender

DISPLACED PEOPLES’ RIGHTS AND PROTECTION

At a meeting in Brussels on 20 March 2023, The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) Filippo Grandi, the Commissioner for Health, Humanitarian Affairs and Social Development of the African Union Commission, Minata Cessouma Samate, the EU Commissioner for Home Affairs, Ylva Johansson, and the IOM Director General, António Vitorino, discussed and advanced the priorities of the AU-EU-UN Tripatite Taskforce. The Taskforce on the Situation of Migrants and Refugees in Libya has called on the international community and Libyan authorities to work together to improve the plight of migrants and refugees in Libya. More information available here.

In a joint statement, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and the International Organisation for Migration (IOM) urged today increased international support for refugees and migrants from Venezuela and the communities in Latin America and the Caribbean that host them. Nearly 7.2 million Venezuelans have left their country in recent years. The vast majority, 6 million, are hosted by countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. While various regularization and documentation initiatives have been implemented in the region, enabling access to vital rights and services for many, the international community needs to continue protecting refugees and migrants from Venezuela and investing in the communities hosting them. More information available here.

On 25 December 2022, the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) strongly condemns the recent decree issued by the Taliban de facto authorities banning all female humanitarian workers at national and international NGOs from working across Afghanistan. This decision is a blatant violation of obligations under international humanitarian law and the most fundamental human rights of women in Afghanistan. It comes just days after the decision to ban all women from access to higher education. By banning female NGO workers, the Taliban de facto authorities are effectively denying these services to a significant portion of the population and putting the lives and well-being of all Afghans, especially women and children, at risk. More information available here.

State by Paulo Pinheiro, Chair of the Independent International Commission of Inquiry on the Syrian Arab Republic during the 52nd Session of the UN Human Rights Council. Today, we offer our heartfelt condolences to the victims of last month’s devastating earthquake in Türkiye and the Syrian Arab Republic and we urge the international community to respond generously to the appeals for support by local and international humanitarian agencies. Last week Syrians marked 12 years of continuing crisis and conflict that has killed over 300,000 civilians and injured many more. Last month the north and north-west of the country was decimated by a once in a century earthquake that has killed at least 50,000 in Türkiye; 4,500 in opposition-held northwest Syria; and 1,500 elsewhere. Syrians in both areas have condemned the actions of the Syrian state and other parties to the conflict who delayed and obstructed aid instead of facilitating it, and lamented the inaction or inability of the international community or the UN to help them rapidly. They feel abandoned and betrayed. More information available here.

IDMC has been monitoring displacement associated with disasters for over two decades. In 2021, we recorded 23.7 million disaster displacements. In line with previous years, weather-related disasters accounted for the majority of these internal displacements, with floods and storms jointly causing 21.6 million internal displacements. Beyond displacements caused by sudden onset hazards, we are also recording increasing numbers of new displacements associated with slow onset hazards such as droughts. To do so, we have developed a new methodology to increase confidence in displacement estimates, Our Pacific Response to Disaster Displacement (PRDD) project is generating new evidence to better understand, plan for, prevent, and respond to disaster displacement in the Pacific region. Already, we have published disaster displacement risk profiles for VanuatuTongaSolomon Islands and Marshall Islands. More information available here.

In their position on migrants, refugees, and asylum seekers, Amnesty International campaigns for a world where human rights can be enjoyed by everyone, no matter what situation they are in. Amnesty has championed the human rights of refugees, asylum seekers and migrants for decades. We campaign to make sure governments honour their shared responsibility to protect the rights of refugees, asylum seekers and migrants. We condemn any policies and practices that undermine the rights of people on the move. More information available here.

CRN-11 EVENTS AND ACTIVITIES

Call for Book Proposal: Migration, Displacement and Development

The Migration, Displacement, and Development book series with Rowman and Littlefield is an interdisciplinary series that critically examines the obstinacy to expand legal protection to displaced peoples beyond the bona fide refugee within local, regional, and international contexts. Extending protection to a wide range of displaced persons, the series promises to address adverse effects on those forced to leave their homes in the name of globalization by improving the economic, social, and political conditions driving migration in favour of sustaining growth. The series strives for law and policy reform particularly in areas of trade, economy, remittance and aid as well as protecting individual rights to stay home and live a dignified life. If you are interested in turning your research into a full book visit the MDD Book Series website or  email vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca and benders@seattleu.edu.

Call Editors and Reviewers: Journal of Internal Displacement

The Journal of Internal Displacement is accepting applications for editorial board membership and reviewers. All interested should email: internaldisplacement@gmail.comDeadline: Open

Call For Volunteers: LSA 2022 in San Juan, Puerto Rico

CRN-11 is in need of volunteers as a discussant and notetakers for LSA 2023  in San Juan, Puerto Rico. All interested please email vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca  and benders@seattleu.eduDeadline: 5 April 2023.

Call For Newsletter Editors

CRN-11 Newsletter is produced quarterly per annum and must be released by the last day of March, June, September, and December. The Newsletter Editor will be responsible for:

  • Researching and compiling information for the Newsletter,
  • Assisting with the distribution of the Newsletter electronically to subscribers and other social networks,
  • Inviting and showcasing guest blogger written pieces, and
  • Promoting and advertising the Newsletter with the aim of expanding its reach.

To apply, submit a cover letter and CV to vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca  and benders@seattleu.eduDeadline: Open

Call For Advertisement and Promotion Committee

CRN-11 is recruiting volunteers to lead the Advertisement and Promotion Committee. To apply, submit a cover letter and CV to vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca  and benders@seattleu.edu. Deadline: Open

Become a CRN-11 Research Collaborator

Interested in being a bona fide research collaborator with CRN-11? To apply, submit a cover letter and CV to vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca  and benders@seattleu.edu. Deadline: Open

Invitation to be a Guest Blogger for CRN-11

Do you have an interesting story to tell about internal and international migration and displacement? CRN 11 is eager to share your piece as a guest blogger in our quarterly newsletter.  Submit your stories to vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca and benders@seattleu.edu. Deadline: Open

GENERAL CALLS: UPCOMING EVENTS

Equipping Student Leaders as Partners for Sustainable Humanitarian Action Conference

Wilfrid Laurier University (WLU) and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) are pleased to invite you to an international conference titled Equipping Student Leaders as Partners for Sustainable Humanitarian Action, convened by International Students Overcoming War (ISOW). The conference will be held at the Waterloo, Ontario campus of Wilfrid Laurier University from March 30 to April 1, 2023. Register here.

SHARED – Shared Responsibility at the EU’s External Borders

The Observatori de Dret Públic de la Universitat de Barcelona in collaboration with the (B)Orders Centre of Queen Mary University of London and members of the European Parliament are hereby organising a workshop, meeting with policy makers, and a final conference concerning the notion of ‘shared responsibility’ in European law as applied to the European Border and Coast Guard Agency (Frontex), the EU Member States, as well as third countries and private entities with which they may collaborate in the implementation of the Schengen acquis, concerning the violation of fundamental rights in the context of border enforcement and migration control. More information available here.

Refugee Law Initiative Annual Conference

The Refugee Law Initiative annual conference serves as a dedicated forum for bringing together decision-makers and practitioners, policy-makers, academics and students to share, discover and debate the latest thinking and developments in the refugee protection field. The 7th Annual Conference, “Inequality and Fairness in Refugee Protection”, will be held 21-23 June 2023. Register here.

The Migration Conference 2023 Hamburg

The Migration Conference 2023 is hosted by the Faculty of Law at Universität Hamburg and will be held 23-26 August 2023. More information available here.

Race and Borderlands: Human Rights, Human Triumphs, and Forging Peace on the U.S.-Mexico Border, 7-8 April 2023

The U.S.-Mexico border is a site of human suffering and a showcase of human resilience. This conference brings together scholars, practitioners, student organizations, and grassroots movements from the San Diego and Tijuana regions to collectively consider issues of human rights and racialization in our borderlands. The conference will focus on the human tolls and triumphs that flow across this border every day. We will consider the hindrances and costs, the lives and human sacrifice, and the stories of hope and justice that intermingle in the liminal space of the borderlands. While the conference is free for anyone to attend, we ask that you register in advance. Register here.

RESEARCH, AWARDS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND FELLOWSHIPS

Oxford University Refugee Study Centre Pathways Application

The University of Oxford’s Refugee Studies Centre (RSC) is pleased to announce the launch of applications for RSC Pathways, a three-month online course in Refugee Studies for learners affected by displacement that is available free of charge to individuals who have been affected by forced displacement. The course teaches the interdisciplinary foundations of Refugee Studies, preparing learners for advanced academic, research, and professional opportunities. More information is available here. Deadline: 27 March 2023.

Canadian Immigration Research Portal

Let’s say you want to know how many asylum seekers came to Canada from Iran in 2020. Where do you go to find out? What if you want to apply for a grant to start an after-school program in Lethbridge and you need to know how many 14-year-old refugee children live in the area? The Canadian Immigration Research Portal can be the solution. This new tool provides statistical, demographic data to the public. More information available here.

Call for Applications: FFVT Fellowship Programme

The cooperation project “Forced Migration and Refugee Studies: Networking and Knowledge Transfer” (FFVT) aims to strengthen interdisciplinary forced migration and refugee research in Germany. To this end, the project brings together research and knowledge transfer on forced migration and refugee issues with migration, development, conflict and violence, climate change, health, governance, human rights and other fields of study. More information available here. Deadline: rolling.

Scholarships and Fellowships in Migration Studies

ARMACAD database is a rich resource for those looking for academic and professional programs and events in the field of migration studies and other related areas. More information is available here. Deadline: varied

Applications are Open: Visiting Fellowships, Refugee Study Centre

We are currently receiving applications for Michaelmas 2023 (Sunday 8 October – Saturday 2 December) or Hilary 2024 (Sunday 14 January – Saturday 9 March) terms only.  Please note that applications can only be made for one term. Applications for later terms will open later in the year.  More information is provided here. Deadline: 10 April 2023.

JOB POSTS

Academic Staff: Policy Science and Socio-economic Analysis of Environmental and Climate Issues

The University of Antwerp is a dynamic, forward-thinking university. We offer an innovative academic education to more than 20000 students, conduct pioneering scientific research and play an important service-providing role in society. We are one of the largest, most international and most innovative employers in the region. With more than 6000 employees from 100 different countries, we are helping to build tomorrow’s world every day. Through top scientific research, we push back boundaries and set a course for the future – a future that you can help to shape. More information available here. Deadline: 27 March 2023.

Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology

The Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology is one of the leading centres for research in social anthropology. Common to all research projects at the Max Planck Institute is the comparative analysis of social change; it is primarily in this domain that its researchers contribute to anthropological theory, though many programmes also have applied significance and political topicality. The Department “Anthropology of Economic Experimentation” is seeking a researcher with the highest potential to advance migration and mobility studies. More information is available here. Deadline: 2 April 2023.

Postdoctoral Scholar – Research for Indigenous Social Action and Equity (RISE) Center – Psychology

The Department of Psychology at the University of California, Berkeley seeks applications for a postdoctoral scholar employee to affiliate and work in conjunction with the Research for Indigenous Social Action and Equity (RISE) Center (housed at the University of Michigan). This position is located at Berkeley. The aims of the Center are bold—to re-imagine and re-create how mainstream U.S. culture engages with narratives about Indigenous Peoples. We are working toward a society in which all individuals not only learn about Indigenous Peoples but also learn from Indigenous Peoples. More information is available here. Deadline: 3 April 2023.

Team Lead, Refugee Status Determination (RSD)

The RSD Team Lead assists the Protection Program Coordinator by overseeing Asylum Access Thailand’s (AAT) RSD Team in providing legal representation for RSD cases before UNHCR. This involves managing the RSD caseload at AAT, reviewing screenings, deciding on representation and strategy, finalizing legal submissions, providing group workshops and consulting with partners. Depending on the capacity of the RSD team at the time, the RSD Team Lead also manages durable solutions cases. More information available here. Deadline: 21 April 2023.

Visiting Assistant Professor of Genocide and Mass Atrocity Prevention

The Institute for Genocide and Mass Atrocity Prevention (I-GMAP) at Binghamton University, the State University of New York, invites applications for the position of Visiting Assistant Professor of Genocide and Mass Atrocity Prevention. This is a fixed-term position with an initial appointment for the 2023-2024 academic year and is renewable for a second year (2024-2025), pending satisfactory performance evaluations, and with the possibility of a third year (2025-26) depending on continuing performance and need. More information is available here. Deadline: 5 May 2023.

PUBLICATIONS

New Field Study: Syrians-Barometer. A Framework for Achieving Social Cohesion with Syrians in Turkey

Syrians Barometer (SB)-2021 is one of the most comprehensive annual field studies on the subject of Syrians in Turkey conducted simultaneously with Turkish society and Syrians. The research aims to understand and analyze social encounters, opinions, attitudes, anxieties, expectations and, most importantly, perceptions through comprehensive surveys and focus group meetings. It attempts to observe the trends of change and suggest policy recommendations. Access the full study here.

New Report: Immigration Policy ‘on the fly’: A Critical Review of Pandemic Policymaking in Canada

This report critically reviews key administrative trends and immigration policy responses and their significance for different groups of migrants. The findings show that while the federal government responded with rapid border closures for non-citizens, it immediately began to carve out exceptions for non-discretionary purposes. Ultimately, essential mobility into Canada was defined according to economically driven criteria, with the pandemic sometimes used as an excuse to exclude migrants considered undesirable, particularly asylum seekers, and to achieve administrative efficiencies. Migrants and asylum seekers continue to be made vulnerable by Canada’s immigration and refugee policies. Access the report here.

New Report: World Migration Report 2022

The World Migration Report 2022, the eleventh in the world migration report series, shows that the estimated number of international migrants has increased over the past five decades. The total estimated 281 million people living in a country other than their countries of birth in 2020 was 128 million more than in 1990 and over three times the estimated number in 1970. It also confirmed that COVID-19-related immobility had become the “great disrupter” of migration. Access the report here.

New Report: Global Report on Internal Displacement

The Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre’s Global Report on Internal Displacement (GRID) is the world’s leading source of data and analysis on internal displacement. This year’s edition includes a special focus on internally displaced children and youth. Part 1 presents updated data and analysis of internal displacement at the global level. Data and contextual updates are included in the regional overviews and country spotlights. Part 2 explores the impacts of displacement on children and youth, so often invisible in displacement data, while highlighting promising initiatives that address some of their challenges. Access the report here.

New Report: Migration Governance Indicators Data and the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration: A Baseline Report

This document analyses global, regional and thematic trends that emerge from MGI data concerning the general commitment and the range of associated actions for each of the 23 Global Compact for Migration objectives. The core of the document consists of 23 data bulletins displaying global and regional summary statistics of the answers to the MGI questions mapped against the respective Compact objectives.  Access the report here.

New Report: Filling the Gap: Humanitarian Support and Alternative Pathways for Migrants on Columbia’s Edge

More migrants are taking immense risks to cross the Darién Gap, a dangerous 100 km stretch of dense jungle between Colombia and Panama. Refugees International visited Necoclí and Capurganá, Colombia—two critical junctions in the journey to cross the gap—to better understand humanitarian needs in the region. Access the paper here.

New Report: Automating Immigration and Asylum: The Uses of New Technologies in Migration and Asylum Governance in Europe

This report maps out the existing uses of new technologies across European immigration and asylum systems both at the national and the EU level. This is the first mapping report under the AFAR project. Access the paper here.

Journal Article: ‘Contemporary Wars and Politics of Dispossession: Afghanistan and Ukraine’

This special issue of Refugee Watch focused on the forced migration crises in Afghanistan and Ukraine, authors continue to debate the significance of forced migration studies within the larger context of history, politics and critical methodological interventions in the post-colonial context. Access the special issue here.

Journal Article: ‘The Organisational Pattern of Rohingya Refugee Community in Malaysia: Structural Opportunities, Constraints, and Intra-Community Dynamics’

The article draws attention to the proliferation of Rohingya community organizations in Malaysia. It argues that the ambivalent asylum policy and increasingly unfavorable socio-political environment of the host state were mediated by the organizations through support from the accumulated social capital and established social networks in their localities. The article contributes to debates on refugee self-reliance and their prospective role in enhancing host countries’ social and economic life, as indicated by the Global Compact on Refugees. It is also relevant to general debates about refugee mobilization in transit countries in Southeast Asia.  Access the article here.

Journal Article: ‘Between Aspirations and Law: Protection Consciousness among Congolese Forced Migrants in Rabat’

This special section contributes to the growing interdisciplinary field of camp studies by examining the ways in which scholars methodologically approach and study camps and camp-like spaces. The characteristics of camps, which render them of interest to scholars in the first place, simultaneously generate methodological, ethical, and practical questions for research. Access the article here.

Journal Article: ‘Special Section of Conflict and Society: Advnces in Research 8’

The special section explores the role of art practice in transformation in contexts of violent conflict and displacement. The articles focus on artists that either create in the context of oppression and control or respond to these contexts by creating spaces of resistance, life in and with violent conflict, transformation, and inspiration. The articles discuss a range of initiatives and artistic practices that take place in a variety of contexts, from artists involved in societal transformation in Afghanistan, Cambodia, and Syria, to artists working in Palestine, Chad, Sri Lanka, and Bosnia and Herzegovina. Access the article here.

Journal Article: ‘Between a Rock and a Hard Place: A Human Rights Assessment of the Fate of Excluded Asylum-seekers and Criminal Refugees in Australia’

Richard Burton, soldier, ethnographer, translator, philologist, and colonial intelligence-gatherer spent the early years of his career in Sindh and was the first and primary colonial ethnographer of Sindh. Burton was clearly attracted to the ecumenical complexity of Sindhi religious practice but was hostile in his descriptions of Sindh’s Hindus whom he viewed as a corrupt and scheming “race,” subjecting the Muslims of the province to their tyranny. Access the paper here.

Journal Article: ‘”We are Forgotten”’: Forced Migration, Sexual and Gender-based Violence, and Coronavirus Disease-2019’

Adopting a structural violence approach, this article explores, with survivors and practitioners, how early coronavirus disease-2019 pandemic conditions affected forced migrant sexual and gender-based violence survivors’ lives. Introducing a new analytical framework combining violent abandonment, slow violence, and violent uncertainty, the authors show how interacting forms of structural violence exacerbated by pandemic conditions intensified existing inequalities. Access the article here.

Journal Article: ‘Education as an Opportunity for Integration: Assessing Colombia, Peru, and Chile’s Education Responses to the Venezuelan Migration Crises’

With over 5 million Venezuelans fleeing their home country, Latin America faces its largest migration crisis. Colombia, Peru, and Chile host the greatest number of Venezuelan migrants in the region. Each country has responded differently to the crisis regarding the provision of education. Venezuelan migrants attempting to enter the primary, secondary, and higher education systems encounter various barriers, from struggles with documentation, and limited availability of spaces in schools, to cultural barriers and xenophobia. This paper examines the distinct educational policy responses to Venezuelan migrants in Colombia, Peru, and Chile. Access the article here.

Journal Article: ‘Local Integration: A Durable Solution in Need of Restoration’

Local integration has long been seen as the “forgotten” durable solution to refugee displacement, evidenced by the reluctance of governments across the world to accord refugees new citizenship. This article goes further. It argues that local integration as a durable solution has not been merely forgotten, but deliberately avoided at a national, regional and international level. Access the article here.

Journal Article: ‘Comparative Migration Law: Methods, Debates and New Frontiers’

This special issue examines the purpose and methods of comparison in migration law. With contributions from academics working across a number of interrelated fields, including migration law, refugee law, comparative law, and migration studies. We aim to identify key contemporary debates and chart a program for future research. Access the article here.

Journal Article: ‘More People too Poor to Move: Divergent Effects of Climate Change on Global Migration Patterns’

The observed temperature increase due to anthropogenic carbon emissions has impacted economies worldwide. National income levels in origin and destination countries influence international migration. Emigration is relatively low not only from high income countries but also from very poor regions, which is explained in current migration theory by credit constraints and lower average education levels, among other reasons. These relationships suggest a potential non-linear, indirect effect of climate change on migration through this indirect channel. Access the article here.

Journal Article: ‘What is the Impact of Forced Displacement on Health? A Scoping Review’

While there is a broad literature analysing the effects of migration on health, important knowledge gaps persist particularly on the causal effects of forced displacement on health outcomes. We undertake a scoping review of applied epidemiological, statistical and econometric studies examining causal health impacts of forced displacement, which initially identified 1454 studies from the health and social sciences disciplines published up to May 2021. Our study makes two key contributions. Access the article here.

Journal Article: ‘Measuring the Effect of Climate Change on Migration Flows: Limitations of Existing Data and Analytical Frameworks’

The aim of this paper is to review quantitative large-N studies that investigate the effects of climate change on migration flows. Recent meta-analyses have shown that most studies find that climate change influences migration flows. There are however also many studies that find no effects or show that effects are dependent on specific contexts. To better understand this complexity, we argue that we need to discuss in more detail how to measure climate change and migration, how these measurements relate to each other and how we can conceptualise the relationship between these two phenomena. Access the article here.

Journal Article: ‘The Application of Assisted Migration as a Climate Change Adaptation Tactic: An Evidence Map and Synthesis’

Assisted migration entails the human assisted movement of individuals to more climatically-suitable areas within or outside of their current species range to help species respond to climate change. To better understand the potential for assisted migration to benefit species threatened by climate change, we conducted an evidence synthesis to map examples where assisted migration has been implemented around the world. Access the article here.

Journal Article: ‘Climate Change and Migration from Atolls? No Evidence Yet’

People living on low-lying coral atolls are highly exposed to climate change and there is much discussion that climate change is and will increasingly force their migration. This article presents findings from a systematic literature review on climate-change migration in atolls. We found an implicit (if not explicit) assumption in the literature that migration driven by climate change is already happening, yet the literature shows no empirical evidence of this to date. Access the article here.

New Book: A Novel Approach to EU Asylum Law: The Practitioners’ Handbook

This Practitioners’ Handbook on the Common European Asylum System (CEAS) and EU and Member States’ Commitments under the UN Global Compact on Refugees and the UN Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration identifies CEAS provisions which fulfil the Compacts’ requirements as well as those that diverge therefrom. Access the article here.

New Book: Environmentally Internally Displaced Persons in the Northeastern Backlands of Brazil: A Case Study

The book addresses the relationship between internally displaced persons (IDPs) by natural disasters to search for legal and policy responses not yet applied in the region. Its focus is categorizing those environmentally displaced persons as IDPs, so they receive international legal protection, even without binding norms and institutions to protect them. Access the book here.

New Book: Migration Research in a Digitized World: Using Innovative Technology to Tackle Methodological Challenges (Open Access)

The book explores the implications of the digital revolution for migration scholars’ methodological toolkit. New information and communication technologies hold considerable potential to improve the quality of migration research by originating previously non-viable solutions to a myriad of methodological challenges in this field of study. This book addresses a range of crucial issues related to researcher-designed data collections and the secondary use of ‘big data’, highlighting opportunities, challenges, and limitations. Access the book here.

New Book: The Great Displacement: Climate Change and the Next American Migration

Even as climate change dominates the headlines, many of us still think about it in the future tense—we imagine that as global warming gets worse over the coming decades, millions of people will scatter around the world fleeing famine and rising seas. What we often don’t realize is that the consequences of climate change are already visible, right here in the United States. In communities across the country, climate disasters are pushing thousands of people away from their homes. Access the book here.

New Book: Right Where We Belong: How Refugee Teachers and Students Are Changing the Future of Education

Even as climate change dominates the headlines, many of us still think about it in the future tense—we imagine that as global warming gets worse over the coming decades, millions of people will scatter around the world fleeing famine and rising seas. What we often don’t realize is that the consequences of climate change are already visible, right here in the United States. In communities across the country, climate disasters are pushing thousands of people away from their homes. Access the book here.

New Book: Transnational Migration, Diaspora, and Identity: A Study of Kurdish Diaspora in London (Open Access)

This book explores a common but almost forgotten historical argument that positions the Kurds as powerless victims of the First World War (WW1). To this end, the book looks critically at the unfavourable political situations of the Kurds in the post-WW1 era, which began with the emergence of three new modern nation-states in the Middle East—Turkey, Iraq, and Syria—as well as related modernising events in Iran. It demonstrates the dire consequences of oppressive international and regional state policies against the Kurds, which led to mass displacement and forced migration of the Kurds from the 1920s on. Access the book here.

New Book Chapter: ‘Leading for Equity and Social Justice: Systemic Transformation in Canadian Education’

Educational institutions, and in particular educational leaders, play critical roles in identifying and rectifying the many inequities that oppress, marginalize, and exclude individual students, educational actors, and some minoritized groups in Canadian education. Access the article here.

New Book Chapter: ‘Police Brutality and Violence Against Liberian Refugees and Migrants in Ghana: Assessing the Role of the Commission on Human Rights and Administrative Justice’

Precursor of the Liberian civil war which led to tens of thousands of them seeking refuge in Ghana for more than three decades started with dispossessing Indigenous Liberians of their land and the birthing of the modern Liberian State with assistance from the ACS in the early 1800. The setter-colonist’s True Whig Party of Liberia, one of the oldest political entities in the world, began its rule in 1869 as the only political party in the country until 1980, save for a brief coup d’état in 1871. Access the chapter here.

New Book Chapter: ‘”I Am Myself” – Queer Refugee Narratives’

The moment I heard about the coming together of this exciting anthology, I knew in my heart that Aram’s stories should be in the Handbook among the refugee narratives this Handbook presents. Aram is a self-identified queer lesbian refugee whom I met through my ethnographic research with Iranian LGBTQ refugees in Turkey. What makes me want to write about Aram, more than anything else, is that they queer all the structures, sites, and systems they encounter and navigate, ranging from asylum bureaucracies to hospital corridors, from textile factories to community meetings. Access the chapter here.

Policy Brief: Financing Responses to Climate Migration: The Unique Role of Multilateral Development Banks

As climate change increasingly contributes to migration and displacement in many parts of the world, there is a pressing need for measures that build resilience and prevent displacement, as well as those that help climate-affected people move to safety and support receiving communities. Access the brief here.

Policy Brief: City Planning with Displaced Communities: The Benefits of Inclusion

Displacement affects more than 100 million people worldwide and is often prolonged. Many displaced people seek opportunities in cities. Whereas participatory planning can be tokenistic and lack impact, the Protracted Displacement in an Urban World project explores participatory information gathering and decision making that meaningfully involve displaced and host communities in catalysing more equitable and inclusive urban development. Access the brief here.

Blog Post: From Teacher to Displaced Person and Back

Daw Chan (all names in this article have been changed), a 27-year-old ethnic Chin woman, is no stranger to moving around. When she was younger, she worked abroad in Malaysia, Singapore and Thailand, and sent money back to her family. On her return, she helped her parents with managing the Christian boarding school they ran in her home settlement in Paletwa, a township in the northwest of Myanmar. While there was no fighting where they lived, she remembers with teary eyes that even then there were displaced people from nearby areas. Access the post here.

Blog Post: Feminism as Method: How do we do Gender in International Refugee Law?

Zora Neale Hurston, the Black American anthropologist and author whose works were pilloried in her lifetime and lauded posthumously, described research as ‘formalised curiosity … poking and prying with a purpose’. In this blog, I suggest that the notion of ‘poking and prying with a purpose’ is a helpful way of conceiving feminist engagement with international law. Feminist international law scholarship provides an array of methodological tools to interrogate and expose the gendered nature of international law but also to envisage and build alternative futures. Access the post here.

Magazine Article: It’s Time to Rethink the Idea of the “Indigenous”

Many groups who identify as Indigenous don’t claim to be first peoples; many who did come first don’t claim to be Indigenous. Can the concept escape its colonial past? Identity evolves. Social categories shrink or expand, become stiffer or more elastic, more specific or more abstract. What it means to be white or Black, Indian or American, able-bodied or not shifts as we tussle over language, as new groups take on those labels and others strip them away. Access the article here.

Documentary Film: Beyond Extinction: Sinixt Resurgence

Rungh is pleased to partner with the 2022 DOXA Documentary Film Festival (Vancouver) for the World Premiere of Governor General Award-winning Ali Kazimi’s new documentary “Beyond Extinction: Sinixt Resurgence”. In “Beyond Extinction”, he traces Indigenous matriarchs who revive traditions and fight to save an ancient burial ground in British Columbia’s Slocan Valley. Declared “extinct” by the Indian Act, the film documents their intimate living histories and their decades long struggle for recognition. Access the Film here.

Documentary Film: New Country, New Parenthood: Syrian Refugee in the Context of Resettlement

The two documentary-style videos “Refugees Coming to Canada” and “Refugees Resettled in Canada” offer first-hand advice from Syrian refugees who have resettled in Canada to those waiting to come to Canada or who are newly arrived. Participants generously agreed to share their stories and experiences, and to offer advice on what to bring, what to expect, and what to do to allow for an easier adjustment post-migration. They share what they wished they had known when preparing to move and during their first year in Canada. Access the first film here And the second film here.

ANNOUNCEMENTS, CAMPAIGNS, AND ALERTS

Member Request

If you are accepting a research assistant or fellow in migration or displacement studies, please get in touch with our (former) collaborator, Azin Emami aziemami@gmail.com. Azin recently graduated from a PhD program in International Relations, focusing on migration as an adaptation strategy to climate change, the implications of non-recognition for environmentally displaced persons and the nexus between environmental migration and labour migration. She has experience from the International Organization for Migration (IOM), where she conducted research on forced migration, climate change and environment trends and challenges in the Middle East and North Africa region in humanitarian and (post) conflict settings; with a specific focus on water scarcity. She has also conducted research on the Migration Sustainability and Transformation (MISTY) project at the Hugo Observatory (University of Liège) and has worked as a researcher at the Climate Displacement Planning Initiative in Canada. Please contact: aziemami@gmail.com.

IN THE NEWS

The Conversation, Why it’s important to understand the unique plight of IDP in Africa (15 November 2022)

NPR, Biden Administration invites ordinary Americans to help settle refugees (24 January 2023)

Japan Times, Hidden graves: India’s crackdown on Kashmir rebel funerals (11 February 2023)

NDTV, Massive landslides in Peru, boulders fall inches away from cars (24 February 2023)

Haaretz, Clashes between police, protesters in Tel Aviv after Netanyahu pauses judicial overhaul (26 March 2023).

InterAction, On eighth anniversary of Yemen conflict, tens of millions need assistance (27 March 2023)

UN News, Dismantling racism today starts by understanding slavery’s ‘horrific’ past (27 March 2023)

BBC, Kenya’s Azimio protests: Hundreds storm farm of ex-President Uhuru Kenyatta (27 March 2023)

SEND US YOUR NEWS AND EVENTS

Displaced Peoples (CRN11) newsletter is published quarterly.  The newsletter is a venue for sharing information regarding displaced peoples, broadly defined. Your contribution to the newsletter is crucial to its sustenance, success and quality. To contribute to the newsletter, please contact Veronica Fynn Bruey and Steven Bender: vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca and benders@seattleu.edu. To subscribe or unsubscribe, visit CRN 11 Displaced Peoples.

MARCH NEWSLETTER: VOLUME 4, ISSUE 1, 2022

MARCH NEWSLETTER: VOLUME 4, ISSUE 1, 2022

CRN11_Newsletter_Vol4Iss1_03Mar22_FINAL

WELCOME: Volunteer for LSA 2022!

Dear Colleagues:

This is the first quarterly newsletter of the year: Volume 4, Issue 1. Sadly, Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has resulted in some 660,000 refugees and over 2,000 deaths. There have also been reports of racial discrimination directed at African nationals attempting to seek refuge in Poland. As the situation worsens on day seven of the attacks, we want to show our support and stand in solidary with everyone affected.

We hope you are looking forward to the 7th Global Annual Meeting (Rage, Reckoning, & Remedy) of the Law and Society Association in Lisbon, Portugal on 13-16 July 2022. We are in need of volunteers to serve as chairs, discussants, and notetakers for CRN11 sessions. We invite you to express your interest by emailing us at vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca and benders@seattleu.edu. First come, first serve.

CRN 11 is happy to announce the launch of the Migration, Displacement, and Development book series with Rowman and Littlefield (Lexington Books). The interdisciplinary book series critically examines the obstinacy to expand legal protection to displaced peoples beyond the bona fide refugee within local, regional, and international contexts. The book series attracts (emerging and displaced) scholars who boldly critique conventional worldviews as well as those who suggest cutting-edge approaches to addressing and ameliorating the harsh realities of global displacement. For more information, email us at vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca and benders@seattleu.edu.

In closing, we would like to reaffirm our support for all those affected by the Russian invasion of Ukraine.

Veronica Fynn Bruey and Steven Bender

DISPLACED PEOPLES’ RIGHTS AND PROTECTION

The United Nation High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) approach to working with minorities and indigenous peoples. Questionnaire responses submitted by the UN system to the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (UNFPII) in preparation of the 21st Session to be held on 25 April – 6 May 2022, The UNHCR asserts discrimination against national, ethnic, religious and linguistic minorities can be both a driver/cause of displacement and/or statelessness, and it can also impact those who have been displaced or who are stateless. UNHCR thus has a direct interest in the subject of this report and wishes to share some initial, and non-exhaustive, feedback on situations of discrimination against minorities and activities which have been undertaken to promote and protect minority rights. Indigenous peoples and minorities in forced displacement and situations of statelessness are at disproportionately heightened risk of marginalization, discrimination, violence, abuse and exploitation. More information available here.

On 14 March 2022, the 66th session of the Commission on the Status of Women will focus on “Achieving gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls in the context of climate change, environmental and disaster risk reduction policies and programmes,” in alignment with International Women’s Day, with its focus on gender equality and climate action, calling for women and girls’ full participation in decision-making in public life. Among UNFPA priorities is to impart the impact of climate change on sexual and reproductive health and rights, gender-based violence and harmful practices and bodily autonomy and to advocate for gender-sensitive climate resilience to protect and advance progress on the three transformative results. More information available here.

On 1 March 2022, United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights experts sound alarm on serious Papua abuses and call for urgent aid in Indonesia. The UN human rights experts expressed serious concerns about the deteriorating human rights situation in the Indonesian provinces of Papua and West Papua, citing shocking abuses against indigenous Papuans, including child killings, disappearances, torture and mass displacement of people. The experts called for urgent humanitarian access to the region, and urged the Indonesian Government to conduct full and independent investigations into abuses against the indigenous peoples. More information available here.

Security Council vote sets up emergency UN General Assembly session on Ukraine crisis. The United Nations Security Council voted on Sunday (27 February 2022) to call for a rare emergency special session of the 193-member UN General Assembly on Russia’s military operation in Ukraine, which will be held on Monday (28 February 2022). The measure convening the General Assembly session was adopted by a vote of 11 in favor, with Russia voting against, and China, India and the United Arab Emirates abstaining. The request for an urgent meeting by the General Assembly comes after Russia vetoed on Friday a US-led draft Security Council resolution that would have ‘deplored in the strongest terms the Russian Federation’s aggression against Ukraine’. Since the text was procedural, none of the five permanent Council members – China, France, Russia, United Kingdom and the United States – could use their vetoes. The measure needed only nine votes in favor to pass. More information available here.

ON 25 February 2022, in a statement at the end of a three-day trip to Afghanistan, the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) Executive Director, Catherine Russell, said the international community and the de facto authorities must find ways to work together – for the sake of the children of Afghanistan. Decades of conflict, a devastating drought, a collapsing economy and the impact of international sanctions are causing irreparable damage to the children of Afghanistan. In the streets of Kabul, scores of very young children dart in and out of traffic, chasing cars and asking for money. Store shelves and vegetable markets are well stocked, yet hardly anyone can afford to buy. In a hospital in Kandahar, emaciated babies lie motionless two to a bed, too weak to even cry amid a spike in cases of severe acute malnutrition. A 25-year-old mother of five told me that her family subsists on a diet of bread and water. More information is available here.

Remarks of the United Nations (UN) Secretary-General, António Guterres’, to the opening meeting of the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People, in New York on 8 February 2022. The situation in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, continues to pose a significant challenge to international peace and security. The promise of the independence of the Palestinian State remains unfulfilled. Political, economic and security conditions across the Occupied Palestinian Territory are deteriorating as Palestinians experience high levels of dispossession, violence and insecurity. We urgently need to intensify collective efforts to resolve the conflict and end the occupation in line with United Nations resolutions, international law and bilateral agreements. See the full remarks: SG/SM/21136.

CALLS: CRN-11 EVENTS

Webinar: Health and Internal Displacement in the Middle East

“Sexual Violence and Forced Displacement in the Middle East: A Scoping Review” by Dr. Veronica Fynn Bruey, Assistant Professor, Legal Studies, Athabasca University on 11 April 2022, 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (UK). Registration opens here.

Call For Volunteers: LSA 2022 in Lisbon, Portugal

CRN-11 is in need of volunteers as chairs,  discussants, and notetakers for LSA 2022 conference in Lisbon, Portugal. All interested please email vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca  and benders@seattleu.eduDeadline: 10 March 2022

Call for Book Proposal: Migration, Displacement and Development

Veronica Fynn Bruey and Steven Bender as co-editors, have launched the Migration, Displacement, and Development book series with Rowman and Littlefield. The interdisciplinary series critically examines the obstinacy to expand legal protection to displaced peoples beyond the bona fide refugee within local, regional, and international contexts. Extending protection to a wide range of displaced persons, the series promises to address adverse effects on those forced to leave their homes in the name of globalisation by improving the economic, social, and political conditions driving migration in favour of sustaining growth. The series strives for law and policy reform particularly in areas of trade, economy, remittance and aid as well as protecting individual rights to stay home and live a dignified life. If you are interested in turning your research into a full book, email vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca and benders@seattleu.edu.

Call for CRN-11 Newsletter Editor

CRN-11 Newsletter is produced quarterly per annum and must be released by the last day of March, June, September, and December. The Newsletter Editor will be responsible for:

  • Researching and compiling information for the Newsletter,
  • Assisting with the distribution of the Newsletter electronically to subscribers and other social networks,
  • Inviting and showcasing guest blogger written pieces, and
  • Promoting and advertising the Newsletter with the aim of expanding its reach.

To apply, submit a cover letter and CV to vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca  and benders@seattleu.eduApplication Deadline: Open

Call For Volunteers: Advertisement and Promotion Committee

CRN-11 is also recruiting volunteers to lead the Advertisement and Promotion Committee. To apply, submit a cover letter and CV to vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca  and benders@seattleu.edu. Deadline: Open

Become a CRN-11 Research Collaborator

Interested in being a bona fide research collaborator with CRN-11? To apply, submit a cover letter and CV to vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca  and benders@seattleu.edu. Deadline: Open

Invitation to be a Guest Blogger for CRN-11

Do you have an interesting story to tell about internal and international migration and displacement? CRN 11 is eager to share your piece as a guest blogger in our quarterly newsletter.  Submit your stories to vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca and benders@seattleu.edu. Deadline: Open

GENERAL CALLS: UPCOMING EVENTS

Rewriting Jurisprudence: Centring Refugee and Migrant Lived Experience

Rewriting Jurisprudence: Centring Refugee and Migration Lived Experience is an ongoing project. In its first phase, we will be publishing a selection of rewritten judgments as articles in a special issue of a journal. We will then work towards producing a broader range of rewritten judgments for publication as an edited collection. Our strong preference is that these publications will be open access. During the project we will also publish shortened or draft versions as blog posts as a way of ensuring both accessibility and timeliness of contributions. We hope very much that the project will inspire other similar initiatives. To submit and abstractclick here.

Support, Sanctuary, Solidarity: Moving Towards Migrant Justice and Resilience

The Centre for Refugee Studies (CRS), in collaboration with York Centre for Asian Research (YCAR), invites abstract proposals for its 16th annual Student Conference on the theme of “Support, Sanctuary, Solidarity: Moving Towards Migrant Justice and Resilience” on March 4-6, 2022. Registration: opens here.

Seminar Series: Race, Borders, and Global (Im)mobility

This series which runs between 19 January and 9 March 2022 critically interrogates how militarized borders, migration enforcement, and racial orderings continue to be normalized globally. Speakers in this series come from a range of disciplines and will examine global migration through questions of race and racism, coloniality, nationalism, citizenship, belonging, criminalization, and bordering. More information available here

Webinar Series: Haunted by Violence

A reading and conversation about bureaucratic and liberal violence, simultaneous requests for and censorship of refugee voices, and ongoing histories that compel our returns to questions of displacement and refuge. More information available here

High-level meeting on health and migration in the WHO European Region: jointly shaping the vision for the health of refugees and migrants

At a high-level meeting on health and migration, hosted by WHO/Europe on 17-18 March 2022, health ministers and representatives of the 53 Member States of the WHO European Region will meet to discuss strategic priorities for health and migration beyond 2022. Representatives of refugee and migrant groups, partner organizations and the WHO African and Eastern Mediterranean regions will be involved to encourage participatory dialogue and interregional collaboration as part of a whole-of-route approach. More information available here.

In Dialogue: Symposium on the Displacement of Peoples Between Africa and Europe

Join Indiana University at the IU Europe Gateway in Berlin for a symposium on the transnational dynamics and repercussions of the movement of displaced peoples between Africa and Europe. This two-day symposium (18-19 March 2022) seeks to feature scholars, practitioners, activists, members of local refugee communities, and artists in a dialogue that investigates how education, national security, humanitarian aid, social services, policies, economics, children, families, and identities are being impacted in communities in Africa and Europe. More information available here.

Improving the Global Refugee Regime: from theory to practice?

Call for Papers for the 2022 6th Refugee Law Initiative Annual Conference, ‘Improving the Global Refugee Regime: from theory to practice?’ on  29 June – 1 July 2022, which will be run as a virtual event. Please send all paper and panel proposals (of 3-4 papers maximum) for ‘thematic’ and ‘open’ panels to rliconference2022@sas.ac.uk. We welcome proposals from researchers at any stage in their careers and, particularly, from researchers working in or on refugee protection in the global South. More information available here. Deadline: 31 March 2022.

Displacement, Governance and Human Rights

Call for Papers for the FFVT Summer School, ‘Displacement, Governance and Human Rights.’  The interdisciplinary Summer School is hosted by the Centre for Human Rights Erlangen-Nürnberg (CHREN) as a part of “Forced Migration and Refugee Studies: Networking and Knowledge Transfer” (FFVT) and takes place in Nuremberg, Germany, from 10 to 15 July 2022. Participation is open to Master students as well as PhD candidates, Postdocs and junior practitioners of any disciplinary background. More information available here. Deadline: 31 March 2022.

Critical Humanitarianism: Neoliberal Entanglements with the State

This call seeks papers that study the role of nonprofit organisations and its articulation between population management and neoliberalism. Writing retreat at Minjerribah (Stradbroke Island, Queensland, Australia): Monday 30th May 2022 to Thursday 2nd June 2022. For more information email sararguezriva@gmail.com.  Deadline: 20 March 2022.

New Edited Collection on LGBTQI+ Displacement in and from East Africa

Since the early 1990s, political, social and economic instability in East Africa, including long- running conflicts in Sudan, Somalia, Ethiopia and Burundi, has produced high rates of displacement. Movement within and from the region has led to substantial refugee populations being housed in Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda, as well as a large diaspora of East Africans scattered across the globe. More information email queerdisplacementea@gmail.com. Submission Deadline: 1 April 2022.

Writing Workshop on Governance, Conflict Resolution and Climate Change

The Merian Institute for Advanced Studies in Africa (MIASA) seeks to provide Africa-based early career researchers working on the themes of governance, conflict resolution and climate change on the continent with the space and intellectual community to transform a draft paper into a publishable journal piece. The 5-day writing workshop, which will take place on 25-29 April 2022, is designed to provide early career scholars with the opportunity to contribute to knowledge production in one of the three fields of research focus for this workshop: governance, conflict resolution and climate change. More information available here. Details here.

IASFM ’19, San Paolo, Brazil

The 19th International Association for the Study of Forced Migration Conference (IASFM19), with the theme, “Global Issues, Regional Approaches – Contexts, Challenges, Dialogues and Solutions”, will be held from August 1-5 August 2022 and hosted online by Universidade Católica de Santos (UniSantos). More information is available here. Registration: opens here

Asia Pacific Journal of International Humanitarian Law

The Asia-Pacific Journal of International Humanitarian Law is a publication of the Institute of International Legal Studies University of the Philippines Law Center (UP-IILS) and the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC). We invite the submission of articles on subjects related to international humanitarian law, humanitarian policy or

humanitarian action, provided the article has not been published or accepted elsewhere. In order to qualify for submission, an article must either be authored by someone from, or based in, the Asia-Pacific region or, alternatively, be about the Asia-Pacific region. More information is available here. Deadline: rolling 

RESEARCH, AWARDS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND FELLOWSHIPS

Funding Opportunity for Population, Refugee and Migrants NGOs in Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela

This announcement is designed to accompany PRM’s General NGO Guidelines, which contain additional information on PRM’s priorities and NGO funding strategy with which selected organizations must comply. Proposed activities are intended to support Colombian and Venezuelan populations of concern in Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela.  No regional or multi-country application packages will be considered.  Refer to guidelines below for further details.  Because of PRM’s mandate to provide protection, assistance, and sustainable solutions for refugees and victims of conflict, PRM will consider funding only those programs that include a target beneficiary base of at least 50 percent refugees, asylum seekers, and vulnerable migrants. More information is provided here. Deadline: 08 March 2022.

Funding Opportunity for NGOs Programs Benefitting Ethiopia and Kenya

This announcement is designed to accompany PRM’s General NGO Guidelines, which contain additional information on PRM’s priorities and NGO funding strategy with which selected organizations must comply.  Please use both the General NGO Guidelines and this announcement to ensure that your submission is in full compliance with PRM requirements and that the proposed activities are in line with PRM’s priorities.  Submissions that do not reflect the requirements outlined in these guidelines will not be considered. Proposed activities should primarily support refugee populations in Ethiopia and Kenya.  Because of PRM’s mandate to provide protection, assistance, and sustainable solutions for refugees and victims of conflict, PRM will consider funding only those programs that include a target beneficiary base of at least 50 percent refugees. More information is provided here. Deadline: 18 March 2022.

International UN Day of Solidarity with the Palestinian People: Refugees and Conflict Studies

Call for papers by the  Frontiers in Human Dynamics/Political Science. Contributions sought for a research topic on “International UN Day of Solidarity with the Palestinian People: Refugees and Conflict Studies.” More information is provided here. Deadline: 31 March 2022.

Funding Programme Forced Migration

The Gerda Henkel Foundation welcomes research projects that adopt multidisciplinary approaches within this framework. Engaging in comparisons across regions and time periods should also be a priority here. Projects that incorporate intersectional perspectives and issues are highly desirable too. Depending on the research approach taken and possibilities at hand, cooperation with local knowledge-producers (researchers as well as civil society actors), or people affected by displacement within countries of origin or asylum (particularly in the “Global South”), is strongly encouraged. More information is provided here. Deadline: 15 June 2022.

JOB POSTS

IDRC/CRDI Research Chair Professor: Gender in Forced Displacement in Asia

Applications are invited from for a direct-hire in a full-time position as the IDRC Research Chair Professor on Addressing Gender in Forced Displacement in Asia at the Professor level in the Gender and Development Studies program (GDS) in the Department of Development and Sustainability (DDS), School of Environment, Resources and Development (SERD) at the Asian Institute of Technology (AIT), Thailand. More information available here. Deadline: 31 March 2022. 

PUBLICATIONS

Hearing: ‘Liberia: Massaquoi Freed from Jail in Run-Up to Finnish Verdict’

There’s a new surprise in the trial of Gibril Massaquoi. On Wednesday February 16, the Finnish court released this former Sierra Leonean rebel after almost two years in detention. The trial verdict is expected by April 29, and his release is fuelling speculation about a possible acquittal. In an interview with Justice Info on January 24, Massaquoi expressed confidence in the Finnish justice system, but not in the investigators. Access the hearing information here.

New Report: ‘Climate Change: A Threat to Human Wellbeing and Health…’

UN scientists on Monday delivered a stark warning about the impact of climate change on people and the planet, saying that ecosystem collapse, species extinction, deadly heatwaves and floods are among the “dangerous and widespread disruptions” the world will face over the next two decades due to global warming. Access the full report here.

New Report: Integration of Refugees in Portugal: The Role and Practices of Reception Institutions

In Portuguese. Access the full report here.

New Report: ‘Humanitarian Debate: Law, Policy, Action’

Established in 1869, the International Review of the Red Cross is a peer-reviewed journal published by the ICRC and Cambridge University Press. Its aim is to promote reflection on humanitarian law, policy and action in armed conflict and other situations of collective armed violence. A specialized journal in humanitarian law, it endeavours to promote knowledge, critical analysis and development of the law, and contribute to the prevention of violations of rules protecting fundamental rights and values. The Review offers a forum for discussion on contemporary humanitarian action as well as analysis of the causes and characteristics of conflicts so as to give a clearer insight into the humanitarian problems they generate. Finally, the Review informs its readership on questions pertaining to the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement and in particular on the activities and policies of the ICRC. Access the full report here.

Journal Article: ‘Ethical Considerations: Research with People in Situations of Forced Migration’

Research involving people in situations of forced migration deepens our understanding of their experiences and has the potential to inform evidence-based decision-making, but also poses particular ethical challenges and opportunities. This document is intended to provide researchers, community organizations, and people in situa- tions of forced migration with information on the particularities of forced migration contexts to complement established ethical principles and frameworks on research with human subjects more generally. Access the paper here. 

Journal Article: ‘The Current Migrant and Refugee Crisis in Europe: Refugee Reception Centers in South-east Bulgaria’

In this article, we analyzed the current refugee crisis in Europe by discussing its main characteristics within the European context. A comparison between the different routes in Western, Central, and Eastern Mediterranean, the Western Balkans, and in general in South-Eastern Europe was done. As the main research problem, we focused on Bulgaria as an entry gate for the arriving immigrants and we presented the most recent statistics related to the illegal entries in the country. Among our objectives was the analysis of the current problems at the reception centers in South-Eastern part of Bulgaria. Access the paper here.

Journal Article: ‘Understanding Integration Experience and Wellbeing of Economic-Asylum Seekers in Italy: The Case of Nigerian Immigrants’

The literature on migrants’ integration and wellbeing is ample, but the case of economic-asylum seekers in a protracted asylum application system is yet to receive sufficient attention. The economic-asylum seekers are a unique group who migrate with an economic motive but apply for asylum to achieve economic integration in the host country. We use the aspiration-capability framework and a mixed-method approach: participant observation, focus group discussion, and field survey, to study a group of economic-asylum seekers from Nigeria when they were waiting for their asylum decisions in Italy. We find that they evaluate their wellbeing by reflecting on their premigration aspirations, integration constraints, and capabilities. Access the paper here.

Journal Article: ‘Generalised Push-back Practices in Europe: The Right to Seek Asylum is a Fundamental Right’

In recent years, more and more asylum seekers trying to reach the European Union (EU) have found themselves subjected to practices that contradict the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights and the democratic principles within the Dublin III Regulation. The inalienable right of those individuals to seek asylum is violated every time that the Member States’ national authorities subject them to irregular procedures and deny them their right to international protection without an individual assessment of their asylum claims. These practices are defined as push-backs. Access the paper here.

Journal Article: ‘SARS-CoV-2 attack rate in reception and accommodation centres for asylum seekers during the first wave: Systematic review of outbreak media reports in Germany’

Despite concerns about the impact of the severe acute respiratory syndrome corona virus (SARS-CoV-2) in refugee camps, data on attack rates and effectiveness of containment measures are lacking. We aimed to (1) quantify the attack rate of SARS-CoV-2 during outbreaks in reception and accommodation centres in Germany during the first pandemic wave, (2) assess differences in the attack rate based on containment measures, and (3) provide an overview of testing strategies, communication, conflicts, and protection measures for refugees with special needs. Access the paper here.

Journal Article: ‘Turkish and Libyan Refugee Deals: A Critical Analysis of the European Union’s Securitarian Irregular Migration Policy’

This article critically analyzed the Turkish and Libyan refugee deals. We argued that these deals proved to be unsustainable policy frameworks by focusing on their practical outcomes regarding humanitarian objectives. We utilized the ‘Fortress Europe’ concept to demonstrate how the European Union’s security concerns shaped the framework of these deals. Our study elaborated on two main arguments: First, these deals have undermined both Turkey and Libya’s migration management capacities. Second, these deals failed to provide adequate mechanisms supervising the enforcement of humanitarian objectivesAccess the paper here.

Journal Article: ‘The impact of COVID-19 on the living and survival conditions of internally displaced persons in Burkina Faso’

In recent years, as in other parts of the Sahel, the threat of terrorism has escalated in Burkina Faso. In 2019, this country hosted the fourth highest number of new conflict-related internal displaced persons (IDPs) in the world. These people have to cope simultaneously with the full spectrum of environmental, social and health-related stresses in the long, medium and short term, respectively. We seek to compare the living conditions of IDPs before and during the lockdown implemented by the authorities (between 27 March and 5 May 2020) to contain the spread of the virus. Access the paper here.

Journal Article: ‘The ramification of Cameroon’s Anglophone crisis: conceptual analysis of a looming “Complex Disaster Emergency”’

One of Africa’s newest struggles for liberation: Cameroon’s Anglophone crisis, which emerged from legal and education grievances in 2016, rapidly escalated into a secessionist political conflict that is threatening the unity of the country, with potential to degenerate into a complex emergency. In an exploratory, qualitative, analytical, and descriptive case study research tradition involving document/content analysis, we apply the Robert Strauss Centre’s complex emergency framework to investigate the potential of the Anglophone crisis, whose ramifications lead us to consider it an acute complex emergency. Our contention is based on the fact that 72.5% of the variables in all the complex emergencies fall within the relevant to extremely relevant ranking criteria. Access the paper here.

Journal Article: ‘Environmental Displacement in the Anthropocene’

This intervention invites more substantial scholarly attention to human displacement in and of the Anthropocene—this current epoch in which humans have become the primary drivers of global environmental change—and sets out an initial framework for its study. The framework is organized around interrelated contributions. First is the recognition that displacement is driven not just by climate change but also broader forms of environmental change defining the Anthropocene, including biodiversity loss, changes to land and water resources, and the buildup of nuclear debris, along with their intersections. Second, the framework parses out three distinct moments of displacement in the Anthropocene: displacement as a consequence of, prerequisite to, and active response to environmental change. Access the paper here. 

Journal Article: ‘Suicide Attempts Among Adult Eritrean Refugees in Tigray, Ethiopia: Prevalence and Associated Factors’

The present study assessed the prevalence of and factors associated with suicide attempts among adult Eritrean refugees in Tigray, Ethiopia. Access the paper here.

Journal Articles: ‘Special Issue: Displaced Syrians’

Access the articles here. 

Journal Articles: ‘Special Issue on New Demographic Directions in Forced Migrant and Refugee Research’

Access the articles here.

Journal Articles: ‘Special Issue on Displacement and Dispossessions’

Access the articles here.

Journal Articles: ‘Externalisation/Mobility and Agency in Protracted Displacement’

Access the articles here.

Journal Articles: ‘Migrants, refugees, and displaced persons in the Middle East and North Africa’

Access the articles here.

Journal Articles: ‘Journal of Internal Displacement, Volume 12, Issue 1’

Access the articles here.

New Book: ‘Refugees and Knowledge Production’

Building on research within the fields of exile studies and critical migration studies and drawing links between historical and contemporary ‘refugee scholarship’, this volume challenges the bias of methodological nationalism and Eurocentrism in discussing the multifaceted forms of knowledge emerging in the context of migration and mobility. With critical attention to the meaning, production and scope of ‘refugee scholarship’ generated at the institutions of higher education, it also focuses on ‘refugee knowledge’ produced outside academia, and scrutinizes the conditions according to which it is validated or silenced. Access the book here.

New Book: ‘Christianity and the Law of Migration’

The collection brings together legal scholars and Christian theologians for an interdisciplinary conversation responding to the challenges of global migration. Gathering 14 leading scholars from both law and Christian theology, the book covers legal perspectives, theological perspectives, and key concepts in migration studies. Access the book here.

New Book: ‘Gender, Identity and Migration in India’

The book focuses on voices of displaced women who constitute a critical part of the migration process through an unravelling of the engendered displacement. It draws attention to the various processes, methods and approaches by national and international human rights and humanitarian laws and principles, and the experiences of the relevant communities, organisations towards peaceful co-existence. The contributions to this volume embellish the argument that there is a direct correlation between an academic researcher’s positionality, methods and trajectories of critical knowledge production. Access the book here.

New Book: ‘Asylum as Reparation: Refuge and Responsibility for the Harms of Displacement’

This book argues that states have a special obligation to offer asylum as reparation to refugees for whose flight they are responsible. It shows the great relevance of reparative justice and the importance of the causes of contemporary forced migration for our understanding of states’ responsibilities to refugees. Access the book here.

New Book: ‘Mediated Lives: Waiting and Hope Among Iraqi Refugees in Jordan

Using the example of Iraqi refugees in Jordan’s capital of Amman, this book describes how information and communication technologies (ICTs) play out in the everyday experiences of urban refugees, geographically located in the Global South, and shows how interactions between online and offline spaces are key for making sense of the humanitarian regime, for carving out a sense of home and for sustaining hope. This book paints a humanizing account of making do amid legal marginalization, prolonged insecurity, and the proliferation of digital technologies. Access the book here.

New Book: ‘Forced Displacement and NGOs in Asia and the Pacific’

This volume presents a comprehensive survey of the dynamics of conflict and climate induced forced displacement and organisational response across Asia and the Pacific. The Asia Pacific region hosts some of the largest numbers of displaced people on the planet, with some of the fewest protections available and sparse frameworks for advancing rights, livelihood, and policy. The region maintains the lowest number of signatory states to international refugee protection covenants, and the majority of national protection and support systems are ad hoc, precarious, and unpredictable. Access the book here. 

New Book: ‘Documenting Displacement: Questioning Methodological Boundaries in Forced Migration Research’

Documenting Displacement explores the ethics and methods of research in diverse forced migration contexts and proposes new ways of thinking about and documenting displacement. Each chapter delves into specific ethical and methodological challenges, with particular attention to unequal power relations in the co-creation of knowledge, questions about representation and ownership, and the adaptation of methodological approaches to contexts of mobility. Contributors reflect honestly on what has worked and what has not, providing useful points of discussion for future research by both established and emerging researchers. Access the book here.

New Book Chapter: ‘What Shapes the Narratives on Internally Displaced People in Dnipro Media?’

Long thought of as unthinkable in Ukraine, the issue of IDPs suddenly appeared on the agenda during the 2014 crisis. Scholarly literature and the media firstly looked on their lives and problems through the lens of temporariness. However, when displacement lasts longer than five years, it is worth looking deeper into this issue through the perspective of protracted displacement, not only through issues of survival and coping strategies, but considering the refusal to return and (forced or conscious) integration with a view to a long-term coexistence in their new environment. Although like Georgia (Brun, 2016), which suffered from two internal wars in South Ossetia and Abkhazia, Ukrainian society strives to maintain people with their IDP status because their existence and possible return to the Donbas symbolizes the hope of regaining control over occupied territories. Access the chapter here.

Book Review: ‘Entangled Territorialities: Negotiating Indigenous Lands in Australia and Canada

Entangled Territorialities evidently validate Indigenous peoples ongoing struggle (“entanglements”) land dispossession and forced displacement as a result of colonisation and imposition of settler laws. The book serves as a critical dialogue, theoretical framework, and practical tool for teachers, researchers, lawyers, practitioners, and community advocates of Indigenous customary land rights. Access the review here.

Briefing Paper: ‘COVID-19 and Social and Economic Rights of Migrants in Mali’

Produced with the support of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), this analysis specifically sets out the challenges faced by migrants with regard to economic and social rights in the COVID-19 context. This analysis will inform OHCHR’s actions, and also serve as a basis for future activities of the PROMIS project, a UNODC-OHCHR joint initiative aimed at promoting a human rights-based response to smuggling of migrants and to effectively respond to human rights violations related to irregular migration in West Africa. Access the brief here.

Policy Brief: ‘Networks of Care for Displaced LGBTQ+ People: How the United States Can Support LGBTQ+-led Organizations in Central America and Mexico

LGBTQ+ people in Central America are often at heightened risk of violence and discrimination, and thousands have fled their home countries in search of international protection. While the United States remains a major destination for displaced LGBTQ+ people, increasingly, more and more LGBTQ+ people on the move are heading to countries within the region to seek protection. Protection systems in the region are improving but need strengthening. LGBTQ+-led organizations in Central America are often leaders in these systems, providing protection, support, and advocacy for and on behalf of LGBTQ+ people in their countries of origin, while on the move, and in their destination countries. Access the brief here.

Magazine: ‘The Spaces in Between: Social Memory at Dzaleka Refugee Camp’

In the relatively small, Southeast African nation of Malawi is the multiethnic, multilingual community of Dzaleka Refugee Camp. Refugees at the camp are predominantly from Burundi, the Democratic Republic of Congo (D.R.C.), and Rwanda, with minority communities from Somalia and a few other countries. Swahili has emerged as the lingua franca of the camp with Lingala, French, Kinyarwanda and Kirundi also being spoken. Established in 1994 following the Rwandan genocide, most of its current residents fled various conflicts in the African Great Lakes region. The camp was previously a maximum-security prison; the name Dzaleka comes from the Chichewa phrase N’dzaleka which means ‘I will never do it again’. Many residents have lived in the camp for years, making it a de facto protracted refugee situation hosting over 46,000 residents.  Access the article here.

Blog Post: ‘The New Humanitarian Crisis for Afghans: Access to Asylum’

Rapid changes that happened in the political scene of Afghanistan from April to August 2021, pushed the country to becoming the largest humanitarian crisis in the world in less than 6 months, affecting multiple countries such as Iran, Pakistan and Tajikistan. Thousands of people were displaced, internally or into neighbouring countries. However, compared to the last similar displacement crisis – the Syrian displacement of 2015 – the EU did not face an influx; only a total of 22,000 Afghans were evacuated to the EU. Access the post here.

Blog Post: ‘Flooding Displacement in Malawi: Policy Practice and Prevention’

Malawi has been blessed with a peaceful history. While much of Africa remains embroiled in civil war and sectarian violence that leaves millions displaced, Malawi has not suffered prolonged political violence since the independence struggle. This has made conflict displacement rare—indeed, Malawi has long been a host for refugees from other nations such as Mozambique. However, the country’s geography makes it prone to adverse weather conditions. Access the post here.

Blog Post: ‘The Dom in Lebanon: Citizens, Migrants, Refugees and Nomads’

The Dom are an ethnic minority group who currently reside in several countries throughout the MENA region, including Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, Iraq, Gaza, the West Bank, Egypt and Turkey. Historians and linguistic theorists have found that the Dom’s language, referred to as Domari, derives from an Indo-Aryan language. They insist that the Dom are descendants of a group of itinerant ethnic groups, called the Roma (Romani) people and Lom people. Access the post here.

E-Learning: ‘3rd Online Course on Statelessness’

The Course responds to the need of increased knowledge and capacity to prevent, reduce and resolve statelessness and to protect stateless persons worldwide. The curriculum of the Course ranges from the adoption of the Statelessness international conventions and development of national legislation to the work with stateless persons in the field. Access the course here.

E-Learning: ‘1st Summer School on Internal Displacement in the Middle East: Crisis, Displacement and Protection’

This five-day Summer School offers up to 40 participants from academia, government and civil society in the Middle East a firm understanding of the crisis of internal displacement in the region. Focusing on countries with protracted internal displacement dynamics, the School addresses the situation of internally displaced persons (IDPs) in the Middle East, the challenges that this issue presents, key elements of the humanitarian and development response and the legal and policy frameworks, and the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on IDPs. Access the course here.

Panel Discussion: ‘Fortress Europe and the Syrian Refugee Crisis’

The devastating conflict that caused immense suffering in Syria is now over a decade old, but while the humanitarian and political crisis are far from over, international interest in Syria has been waning. The panel discussion Fortress Europe and the Syrian refugee crisis intends to stimulate critical reflection and debate on the dilemmas facing humanitarian and medical action in the Syrian conflict. Access the video here.

Short Video: ‘Cruel, Costly and Ineffective: The Failure of Offshore Processing in Australia’

Australia’s multi-billion-dollar offshore processing system has demonstrably failed to stop boats, save lives or break the business model of people smugglers, according to a new policy brief from UNSW’s Kaldor Centre for International Refugee Law, ‘Cruel, costly and ineffective: The failure of offshore processing in Australia’, authored by the Kaldor Centre’s, Senior Research Fellow Madeline Gleeson, and international refugee lawyer and scholar Natasha Yacoub. Access the video here.

Research Guide: ‘What is Human Trafficking’

Human trafficking is a phenomenon that has been around for decades but that has recently taken the news and society in general by storm. As more and more people become aware of this terrible crime, it’s important to understand and be aware of the dangers and implications that come with this exploitation. It’s also important to know how to protect yourself as well as recognize human trafficking when possible. Access the guide here.

Information Sheet: ‘Your Rights in Research’

Taking part in a research project gives you a chance to make your voice heard, but it can also be inconvenient, cost you time or money, and/or make you feel physically or emotionally uncomfortable. This information sheet explains key terms and outlines your rights. Access the info sheet here.

Code of Ethics: ‘Critical Reflections on Research Ethics in Situations of Forced Migration’

Research with people in situations of forced migration poses particular ethical challenges because of unequal power relations, legal precariousness, extreme poverty, violence, the criminalization of migration, politicized research contexts, the policy relevance of our research and/or dependence on government and non-governmental services and funding. However, Research Ethics Boards (REBs) are not always aware of these particular ethical issues; some countries and institutions do not have REBs; and some kinds of research are not subject to REB approval. Access the Code of Ethics here.

ANNOUNCEMENTS, CAMPAIGNS, AND ALERTS

A Health Provider’s Role in Fighting Human Trafficking

Human trafficking, a form of modern slavery that exploits people for labor and sex, affects about 24.9 million victims worldwide, the U.S. State Department estimates. And the majority of victims will encounter the health care system during their time being trafficked. Health care providers are uniquely positioned to identify and help human trafficking victims because of the likelihood they will come into contact with victims—particularly in urgent care settings, said forensic nurse Diana Faugno, MSN, RN, CPN. More information is available here.

What is Human Trafficking

Human trafficking is a phenomenon that has been around for decades but that has recently taken the news and society in general by storm. As more and more people become aware of this terrible crime, it’s important to understand and be aware of the dangers and implications that come with this exploitation. It’s also important to know how to protect yourself as well as recognize human trafficking when possible. More information is available here.

IN THE NEWS

African Business, Maternal and reproductive health-care crisis in Ethiopia (3 March 2022).

Ating Enwongo, How internally displaced persons will vote in 2023-INEC (3 March 2022).

The Irrawaddy, Myanmar Junta planes bumb village sheltering displaced Karenni civilians (28 February 2022).

Aljazeera, Forced displacement in Colombia more than doubled in 2021: Report (16 February 2022).

Aljazeera, Madagascar: Death toll from Cyclone Batsirai rises to 120 (11 February 2022).

Norwegian Refugee Council, Renewed conflict in Ukraine would trigger massive displacement (03 February 2022).

Sertan Sanderson, Why do migrants try to come to the United Kingdom? (31 January 2022).

Maggie McCullough, Rising home sale prices and the risk of renter displacement (31 January 2022).

Harriet Barber, Tropical storm Ana wreaks havoc across southern Africa (28 January 2022).

Melissa Gater, Novak Djokovic was detained for five days – refugees in the same hotel have been there for years (24 January 2022).

Madeleine Gleeson, Australia’s asylum policy has been a disaster. It’s deeply disturbing the UK wants to adopt it (07 December 2021). 

SEND US YOUR NEWS AND EVENTS

Displaced Peoples (CRN11) newsletter is published quarterly.  The newsletter is a venue for sharing information regarding displaced peoples, broadly defined. Your contribution to the newsletter is crucial to its sustenance, success and quality. To contribute to the newsletter, please contact Veronica Fynn Bruey and Steven Bender: vfynnbruey@athabascau.ca and benders@seattleu.edu. To subscribe or unsubscribe, visit CRN 11 Displaced Peoples.

JUNE NEWSLETTER: VOLUME 2, ISSUE 6, 2020

JUNE NEWSLETTER: VOLUME 2, ISSUE 6, 2020

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WELCOME: IDPs’ Health in COVID-19

Dear Colleagues:

Welcome to the CRN 11 June 2020 Newsletter: volume 2, Issue 6.

According to the Global Report on Internal Displacement 2020, there were 50.8 million internally displaced persons, 45.7 million are as a direct result of conflict and violence. The challenges faced by internally displaced persons (IDPs) by virtue of living in a cramped communal space are not only unique to this particular population but are also exacerbated by several vulnerabilities, including poor health and socio-economic situation.

The added health risks due to COVID-19 have worsened the impact of conflict and disasters on IDPs. For example, the Internal Displacement Monitoring Group reports that only three ventilators are available for the entire five million people in the Central African Republic, which includes 641,000 IDPs. A factsheet based on self-reporting of 3,209 in 49 camps households in Iraq revealed up to 97 per cent of dwellers expressed difficulties with the cost of access to health services.

In a recent report produced by the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement, states are urged to reduce the impact of COVID-19 on IDPs by, inter alia, 1) including IDPs in national and local preparedness and response strategies; 2) stepping up effects to minimise crowding in shelters for IDPs in order to protect the public health, safety, and well-being of individuals; 3) COVID-19 related restrictions on movement must not discriminate against IDPs; and 4) authorities must take all possible measures to prevent COVID-19 related violence  against IDPs.

It is against this backdrop that the Journal of Internal Displacement is inviting you to contribute to its special issue: “A Crisis within a Crisis: Global Pandemics and Displacement”.

Veronica Fynn Bruey and Steven Bender

DISPLACED PEOPLES’ RIGHTS AND PROTECTION

United Nations General Assembly President’s message on World Refugee Day 20 June 2020. On World Refugee Day we hold the 25.9 million refugees of the world in our thoughts. Refugees around the world have made treacherous journeys in pursuit of peace, prosperity, and the full enjoyment of basic human rights. Life has become even more difficult for refugees as the world contends with the COVID-19 pandemic. Travel restrictions have prevented refugees from moving through transit countries. In camp communities, transmission prevention measures are difficult to implement. Space is often at a premium, making physical social distancing impossible. Moreover, access to hand-washing facilities and health services may be limited; and personal protective equipment, if available, may be in short supply. More information available here.

United Nations Secretary General’s message on World Refugee Day 20 June 2020. The COVID-19 pandemic is a sharp reminder of how we are all intimately connected — to each other and to nature.

Nearly 80 million women, children, and men around the world have been forced from their homes as refugees or internally displaced people. Even more shocking: ten million of these people fled in the past year alone. On World Refugee Day, we pledge to do everything in our power to end the conflict and persecution that drive these appalling numbers. More information available here.

On 18 June 2020, the United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR) and the International Organization for Migration (IOM) announced the resumption of resettlement departures for refugees. The temporary hold on resettlement travel, which was necessitated by disruptions and restrictions to international air travel caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, delayed the departures of some 10,000 refugees to resettlement countries. Throughout this period, UNHCR, IOM and partners continued to process and counsel refugees and resettled scores of emergency and urgent cases. More information available here.

On 8 December 2019, Council of Delegates of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement adopted resolution CD/19/R7: Strengthening Implementation of the Movement Policy on Internal Displacement: Ten Years on. Paragraph 1 of Resolution CD/19/R7 urges all the components of the Movement, acting in line with their respective mandates and the Fundamental Principles, to ensure that their responses to the protection and assistance needs of IDPs and host communities, including the support provided to other components of the Movement and responses undertaken in cooperation with other entities, are informed by the Movement Policy on Internal Displacement. More information is available here.

On the World Health Organization’s (WHO) Draft Global Action Plan ‘Promoting the health of refugees and migrants (2019-2023)’. At its Seventy-second World Health Assembly in May 2019, the Health Assembly will discuss a report ‘Promoting the health of refugees and migrants, Draft global action plan, 2019-2023’. Its development is in response to a request by the Health Assembly in resolution WHA70.15 on promoting the health of refugees and migrants for the Director-General, inter alia, to develop a draft global action plan on the health of refugees and migrants for consideration by the Seventy-second World Health Assembly. The aim of the draft action plan is to improve global health by addressing the health and well-being of refugees and migrants in an inclusive, comprehensive manner and as part of holistic efforts to respond to the health needs of the overall population in any given setting, including the coordination of international efforts to link health care for refugees and migrants to humanitarian programmes. More information is available here.

GENERAL CALLS: CRN 11 EVENTS

The Journal of Internal Displacement—Call for Submissions

Theme: ‘A Crisis within a Crisis: Global Pandemics and Displacement’
Publication: January 2021 (Volume 11, Issue 1)
Submission Deadline: 1 September 2020

The Journal of Internal Displacement is now accepting submissions for its January 2021 (Volume 11, Issue 1). We are particularly interested in topics on global pandemics and displacement: SARS, Ebola, H1N1 and COVID-19. Download the Call for Papers here.

The Journal of Internal Displacement (ISSN 1920-5813 Online), established in 2009, is the only scholarly and inter-disciplinary platform for raising the profile of displaced populations through discussions, critical dialogue, emerging themes, reflections and explorations on a wide range of topics and regions around the globe. The JID promotes free and open access and does not charge authors for submissions. Visit our website to submit a paper or subscribe for free.

Call For Members: Research and Development Committee

CRN 11 is currently recruiting members to join Magdalena Krystyna Butrymowicz who leads the Research and Development Committee. Those interested, please email Magdalena: magdalena.butrymowicz@upjp2.edu.pl. Deadline: Open

Call For Volunteers: Newsletter Editor

CRN 11 is currently recruiting volunteers to lead the Advertisement and Promotion Committee. Those interested, please send a cover letter and CV to veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org. Deadline: Open

Interested in making the best use of your time during COVID-19 lockdown? Apply for the CRN11 newsletter editor position.  Submit a cover letter and CV to veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org  and benders@seattleu.edu. Deadline: Open

Become a CRN 11 Research Collaborator

Interested in being a bona fide research collaborator with CRN 11? Email veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org for details on how to apply. Deadline: Open

Invitation to be a Guest Blogger for CRN 11

Do you have an interesting story to tell about internal and international migration and displacement? CRN 11 is eager to share your piece as a guest blogger for our monthly newsletter.  Please submit your stories to veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org and benders@seattleu.edu. Deadline: Open

RESEARCH, JOBS, AND SCHOLARSHIPS

University of British Columbia, President’s Academic Excellence Initiative PhD Award. Deadline: Ongoing.

Princeton University. Princeton Society of Fellows Fellowship Program in the Humanities and Social Sciences 2021-2024. Deadline: 4 August 2020.

University of Peace, Master of Laws in Transnational Crime and Justice. Deadline: 6 September 2020.

University of Pretoria, Mastercard Foundation Scholarship Program. Deadline: 31 August 2020.

UQIDAR joint-PhD Program 2020, Australia and India, University of Queensland. Deadline: 31 December 2020.

UPCOMING CONFERENCES

Colloque international de l’APAD 2020 (Postponed)

Colloque international de l’APAD 2020, Circulations in the Global South: Ethnographic Explorations of Globalized Exchanges (Les Circulations Dans le Sud Global: Ethnographies des échanges Mondialisés), 08-11 December 2020, l’ Université of Lomé, Togo. For more information contact: colloque@apad-association.org.

International Conference on Migration, Development and Human Security

The International Conference on Migration, Development and Human Security, 06-07 August 2020, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Association of Commonwealth University Summer School

Association of Commonwealth University Summer School 2020, The Migration Generation? Climate, Youth and Refugees, 2-10 August 2020, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast, Ghana.

The Migration Conference 2020

The Migration Conference Organizing Committee cordially invite you to submit abstract(s) to the 8th conference in the series which will take place on 9 to 11 September 2020, South East European University campus, Tetovo, North Macedonia.

The 6th International Conference on Conflict, Violence and Development

Due to the current situation of the COVID-19 pandemic, the VI International Conference “Conflict, Violence and Development”, organized by the Institute of Social and Economic Studies (IESE) will take place on 15th  and 16th  September 2020, in Maputo, Mozambique.

Utrecht University, The Netherlands: Connecting Europe Project

Utrecht University, The Netherlands and Connecting Europe Project Conference, Migrant Belongings: Digital Practices and the Everyday, 4-6 November 2020, Utrecht University, The Netherlands.

German Historical Institute

Annual Academic and Policy Symposium, Contested Meanings of Migration Facilitation: Emigration Agents, Coyotes, Rescuers, and Human Traffickers, 16-17 November 2020, Washington, DC.

The Centre for History of the University of Lisbon

The Centre for History of the University of Lisbon, 11th Iberian African Studies, African Transits in the Global World: History and Memories, Heritage and Innovation, 21-23 January 2021, Lisbon, Portugal.

Freedom Network USA Human Trafficking Conference

The 2021 Freedom Network USA Human Trafficking Conference, 25-26 March 2021, Washington DC, USA.

Maastricht Centre for Citizenship, Migration, and Development

Visit the Maastricht Centre for Citizenship, Migration and Development, Maastricht University, The Netherlands for a list of events on Migration.

PUBLICATIONS

Honey Oberoi Vahali, Lives in exile: Exploring the inner world of Tibetan Refugees (10 August 2020). Ebook.

United Nations Children’s Fund, Protecting and supporting internally displaced children in urban settings (July 2019).

Frank Furedi, Why Borders Matter (25 July 2020).

Nasir Ahmad, Nasir Shaheen, and Sajjad Hussain, Internal displacement: Relationship of mental health and education of children in Swat, Pakistan (July-August 2020).

Jacob Soboroff, Separated: Inside an American Tragedy (7 July 2020).

Sophie Buckley, Anna Tickle, and Sarah McDonald, Implementing psychological formulation into complex needs homeless hostels to develop a psychologically informed environment (2 July 2020).

United State Department of State, Trafficking in Person Report 2020 (25 June 2020).

United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, Annual Global Trends Report (18 June 2020).

The Vatican’s the Section for Migrants and Refugees of the Dicastery for Promoting Integral Human Development, Pastoral Orientations on Internally Displaced People (5 May 2020).

Asli Ceylan Oner, Bahar Durmaz-Drinkwater, and Richard J. Grant, Precarity of refugees: The case of Basman-Uzmir, Turkey (02 April 2020).

Ilan Cerna-Turoff, Jeremy C. Kane, Karen Devries, James Mercy, Greta Massetti, and Mike Baiocchi, Did internal displacement from the 2010 earthquake in Haiti lead to long-term violence against children? A matched pairs study design (April 2020).

Howard Adelman, African refugees: Development aid and repatriation (24 February 2020). Ebook.

Vicente Anzellin and Clemence Leduc, Urban internal displacement: data and evidence (February 2020).

Sergio Parra Cely and Clotilde Mahe, Does internal displacement affect educational achievement in host communities? (January 2020).

IN THE NEWS

United Nations, Children’s Fund, UN agencies welcome latest relocations of unaccompanied children from Greece, call for further action and solidarity (8 July 2020).

Greg Barlow, Law and Society Stories – War, refuge and academia (17 June 2020).

Tim Gaynor, Resolving displacement critical for regional, international stability – UN refugee chief (18 June 2020).

Edward Moreno, Lawsuit: Migrants were forced to clean Arizona ICE facility with high COVID-19 infections (10 June 2020).

Donald Kaberuka and Federica Mogherini, COVID-19 makes addressing internal displacement even more urgent (26 May 2020).

United Nations Children’s Fund, 19 million children internally displaced by conflict and violence in 2019, highest number ever (4 May 2020). 

SEND US YOUR NEWS AND EVENTS

Displaced Peoples (CRN11) newsletter is published monthly.  The Newsletter is a venue for sharing information regarding displaced peoples, broadly defined. Your contribution to the monthly newsletter is crucial to its sustenance, success and quality. To contribute to the Newsletter, please contact Veronica Fynn Bruey and Steven Bender: veronica.fynnbruey@tuki-tumarankeh.org and benders@seattleu.edu. To subscribe or unsubscribe visit CRN 11 Displaced Peoples.